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I am looking at some plans of the replica ship "Dunbrody" and the assembly plans of the frames show the siding dimension of the futtocks decreases along the frames length (sketch below showing side and front view of frames). Is this typical of ships built in that era? I have never seen this before, but I have very limited knowledge and I have only ever really looked at model plans and these plans are supposed to represent a ship built during this time. Any comments would be appreciated.

 

 

Diagrammic Assembly of Frames.JPG

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Good evening Todd;

 

I can't be sure of the Dunbrody in particular,  but it was normal for futtocks and toptimbers to taper across their moulded dimensions (L/H side of your picture) and for them to reduce in thickness across the sided dimensions with each successive futtock.  This was done to save weight and to enable a wider selection of timber to be used (most long sections of a tree taper naturally)

 

All the best,

 

Mark P

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Thanks Mark. After looking and some of my older ship construction books I see that the futtocks were tapered leading upwards. It is usually shown as a taper versus stepped like in the Dunbrody construction details.

 

Is this done by model builders as well? Seems like a lot of tedious work.

 

ToddM

Edited by ToddM
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Hi Todd;

 

Your drawing is correct,  in my experience,  although that doesn't cover everything.  The sided dimension remained constant for the length of each futtock.  the taper was between the inner and outer faces:  the moulded dimension.

 

One other point of interest: your drawing shows frame bends,  the name for a frame made up of a two sets of futtocks fixed together.

 

As to whether model makers repeat this,  it depends upon their patience and how faithfully they wish to replicate full-size practice.  As you say,  it is a lot of work!

 

All the best, 

 

Mark P

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