dsmith65

Cleaning model prior staining and painting

Unfortunate no matter how careful I was, my model has some grime on it from being handled while I was building it.  I've sanded it, and there is still some residual discoloration from me handling it.  Does anyone have any suggestions on how I might clean it some more before I stain it?

 

Thanks

 

Don

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What kind of 'grime'? Is it oily in nature? If so, perhaps a little isopropanol (rubbing alcohol)  may lift it. However, if the 'grime' has soaked into the wood, this may be ineffective.

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Don,

 

A while back I happened to pick up a couple of boxes of alcohol wipes for a few dollars. You know, the kind that come in the little foil packs that Dr.s use to wipe your arm before a shot. Now, whenever I see something which needs cleaning I wipe it away before much of anything builds up.

 

John

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I believe that the swabs are 70% Isopropyl OH.  That is the concentration that is

most harmful to bacteria.  The 91% probably works better for cooling and

as an after shave- if you are a nonsmoker and do not need perfume.

I predict that the cost per volume will weigh heavily against the swabs.

 

If removing the top layer of the planks does not work out, you could always

drop back and punt:  Stop by Wood Craft - get a packet or two of thin veneer 

with an appropriate grain and cover the soiled planking with a new layer.

If you choose Maple,Birch,or Beech, it can be dyed or stained and sealed before it is

attached.  Just protect the glue surface side with masking tape or painters tape during

 the stain and seal steps, not necessary if you dye.  The veneer - you should be able to

cut with scissors and a metal straight edge and #11 blade.

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Hello Les here. Another option is lacquer thinner. I know its volatile, but I use it in furniture refinishing to remove all sorts of contaminates. Especially oils. Gloves and a ventilated space such as outdoors I would recommend.

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Thanks everyone for the responses, just now having the time to work on my boats again.  The grime is caused by oils in my skin, so I think going forward I am going to wear gloves when building sections where the wood will show.  The alcohol wipes worked a little, but they were great in showing spots that needed further sanding.  

 

Don

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