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trippwj

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About trippwj

  • Rank
    Scullery Maid
  • Birthday 04/12/1959

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    trippwj

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Eastport, Maine, USA
  • Interests
    Reading, History, most anything with my kids and grand kids.

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3,854 profile views
  1. 10 days ago she who must be obeyed spent a long Saturday night in agony. We went to the ER Sunday morning (NOT something she does without serious illness) and got diagnosis and some meds. After some additional tests to confirm ER diagnosis and meeting with the surgeon, today she was relieved of a severely inflamed gall bladder with 2 very large stones. Feeling much better already (both of us). Top it all off, she is already home and ruling the roost (as usual).
  2. We bought our current house here in Eastport in 2015. While the exterior has been updated with vinyl siding, many of the interior features still hint at the evolution of a home - tin ceilings, classic Federal style layout (2 rooms on each side of center hallway). Old brick on granite ledge foundation. Plaster on lathe walls (not original). Age? Well, no indoor plumbing when built. Tin ceilings not original. Newspapers dating to 1937 found beneath the bottom layer on linoleum flooring. 7 layers of wallpaper found in one room we stripped completely. Age? Our best guess is +/- 10 years. The property was deeded to Eastport in 1811 for construction of the "Poor" house. We know it was a building in use as the poor house in 1818 (year the British returned Eastport to the US). We figure it was built circa 1812-13. Many changes over the subsequent 200 years, but the bones are original (and, after serving as the poor house until about 1926, then a parsonage until 1956 when it became a private home with a small market out back until 2012, it is the poor house again since 2015). I haven't had much success finding old pictures, although it is on the 1879 birdseye map of the city.
  3. I received my copy this week - will be doing a review as soon as I can. Certainly looks good!
  4. No need for copper plating on the lakes as no Teredo "worms" (actually a mollusc). As to the color, I doubt there was a standard. Possibly just a heavy tarring to help seal the wood, but given the added expense of painting (pigment) probably left natural.
  5. I am looking forward to another build by Sjors the musician! Greetings to you & Anja!!
  6. I came across the item below recently and though it may be of insterst to some - Anonymous. 1813. A Complete List of the American Navy: Showing the Name, Number of Guns, Commanders’ Names, and Station of Each Vessel, with the Names of All the Officers in Service, for October, 1813; and Steel’s List of the Navy of Great Britain, for July, 1813. Russell, Cutler, and Company and J. Belcher. https://books.google.com/books?id=zfw-AAAAYAAJ. 1813 A_Complete_List_of_the_American_Navy.pdf
  7. As I recall, I was living at the Fire Station (volunteer department with 6 of us who bunked there at night), working for the commercial ambulance service in town. State EMT license #723 (they issued them sequentially - got mine at age 17).
  8. No problem. I sent him a note on Facebook - will let you know if I hear back.
  9. Contact Adam @skerryamp (the developer) - not sure if he stops by MSW very often these days, though.
  10. Whilst there was a degree of standardization, the bosun (I think, may have been another non-officer) and sailing master had great leeway with where running lines terminated (belaying points), obviously within the physical constraints of the vessel and total rig. Once the landsman learned his way around the vessel, including the riggong, he would "test" for his next rate. If moving to a different ship of same class, there was a shallow learning curve. A different class or size, though, could be quite different. There are no references (official or otherwise) from the period which I am aware of that specified the precise run for a line, but rather specified diameter, blocks, attachment points at fixed end and so forth.
  11. That looks like the 1919 by Davis. A very good overview but, and this is the key to using any reference, the value depends on the degree of historical accuracy you desire. The higher the level of period accuracy desired, the more important contemporary records and resources become. This is a good reference for general wooden shipbuilding, though not specific to period, nation or vessel.
  12. Amazing work by you both! Welcome to MSW - I have admired your work for some time, and as I have no artistic ability, enjoy seeing the results of those so endowed.
  13. Sorry it took so long - have been recovering from a crashed hard drive (fortunately, I did have a good backup of my databases). Here are a few downloadable dictionaries that may be of use to you (in addition to the members available to support with translation). Neuman, Henry. 1799. A Marine Pocket Dictionary of the Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and German Languages, with an English-French and French-English Index. London: Printed for the author and sold by T. Hurst. http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008895773. Paasch, H. 1885. From Keel to Truck: A Marine Dictionary in English, French and German, Amply Illustrated by Explanatory Diagrams of the Most Important Details for the Use of Ship-Owners ... Antwerp: Ratinckx Frères. http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/008909120. Paasch, Heinrich. 1901. “From Keel to Truck” Marine Dictionary in English, French & German... The author. https://books.google.com/books?id=mG_VAAAAMAAJ&. Reehorst, Karel Pieter ter. 1850. The Mariner’s and Merchant’s Polyglot Technical Dictionary of Upwards of Five Thousand Nautical, Steam, and Ship-Building Terms, Commercial and Scientific, in Ten Different Languages, ... with a Precise Explanatory Key to the Pronunciation of These Languages, and a Comparative Table of the Money, Weights and Measures of Sea Ports. London : Williams and Northgate ... http://archive.org/details/gri_33125012932121.

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