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trippwj

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About trippwj

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    Scullery Maid
  • Birthday 04/12/1959

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    Eastport, Maine, USA
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    Reading, History, most anything with my kids and grand kids.

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  1. As my significantly better half (to refer to her as the Admiral would be a demotion of sorts) has noted, effective transcriptionating is as much as arte as a science. In some of her endeavors she has found that the same writer in the same paragraph can offer multiple spellings for the same word. The most pleasurable items to transcribe are those copied into a letterbook by clerks or scribes - they tended to have much cleaner script and few ink smears or scratchouts! As but one example, here is a page from Joshua Humphreys workbook - likely NOT written by a scribe but possibly by Hu
  2. It is indeed the same Bourne. He also had a few other interesting treatises over the years. Bourne, William. 1578a. A Booke Called the Treasure for Traveilers : Devided into Five Bookes or Partes, Contaynyng Very Necessary Matters, for All Sortes of Travailers, Eyther by Sea or by Lande. Imprinted at London : [By Thomas Dawson] for Thomas Woodcocke, dwelling in Paules Churchyarde, at the sygne of the blacke beare. http://archive.org/details/bookecalledtreas00bour. ———. 1578b. Inuentions or Deuises : Very Necessary for All Generalles and Captaines. http://echo.mpiwg-berlin
  3. That's a good start. Any particular style of model or time period? While older, you may also want to look into books by Charles Davis or Underhill.
  4. At most a minor impact for a loaded vessel (an inch or so perhaps) - far less than the consumption of food & water.
  5. Here is a start for you - there are scores more, as well as numerous other resources such as the Navy Documents series (look for Barbary Wars, Quasi War with France, War of 1812 here http://www.ibiblio.org/anrs/c19.html). Byington, Richard Brownlow. 2015. “Cut from Different Cloth: The USS Constitution and the American Frigate Fleet.” Doctor of Philosophy, Florida State University. http://fsu.digital.flvc.org/islandora/object/fsu%3A291267/. Chapelle, Howard I. 1944. The American Sailing Navy: The Ships and Their Development. S.l.: Bonanza. Chapelle, Howard I. 1967. The
  6. Career or construction? For the former there are hundreds (I might exagerate) and for the latter dozens. I'll see what I can pull together but suggest starting with The Six Frigates by Toll, if only for the bibliography!
  7. The advantage to rigging on the model is that you can adjust the tension as necessary. If you are off in your measurement rigging off the model you need to retension when you install and, with the ratlines already strung that is extremely labor intensive. The tying of all those ratlines is for many one of the more tedious activities. Once the shouds are installed and appropriately tensioned on the model it is just a matter of tying off a whole bunch of clove hitches at appropriate distance to put on the rats. You can use the paperclip method on or off the model as it is
  8. The shrouds actually are not looped around the mast and down in "real" practice but rather have a loop at the top which slips over the masthead as in the drawing below (from Peterson) In the example above, each is a doube shroud with a seized "eye" at the top. In many cases, there is only a single shroud (that is, it terminates in a loop at the top and a deadeye at the bottom). Gets confusing, huh? Each shroud goes to a deadeye as shown below: Doing it this way allows each shroud (which hold mast vertical) for appropriate tens
  9. Finding a good copy of Sutherland has always been difficult. The ECHO – Cultural Heritage Online website has his 1711 and 1717 editions in images (tedious, but if someone really was bored each image can be downloaded and assembled into the final book). I don't recall if the plates were present in these versions. I have found the 1748 edition on Google Books, however it suffers the same issues as most of the digitized volumes with fold out plates distorted or not scanned in full. Sutherland, William. 1748. Marine Architecture: Or, the Ship-Builder’s Assistant: Contain
  10. @uss frolick Thanks - I purchased the Cain book today on that site named for a river (under $12 with shipping). I actually have a PDF copy of Crisman's Coffins of the Brave (available at his page on Academia.edu). I have done a fairly deep dive seeking more but it appears most are only in unpublished manuscript form at the Hamilton Scourge website, which is woefully uninformative. I was able to obtain the 2009 ACUA Underwater Archaeology Proceedings via their website (free pdf). i may be able to glean some info from that as there are several articles listed
  11. It is getting a tad late so I must absent myself from the computer for the evening. Will continue the search in the morning. Let me leave you, though, with a couple of teasers. First, a "virtual tour". http://1812tour.hamilton.ca/hamilton_scourge.html There are an impressive number of photographs apparently available through the project. It appears that Brandy Lockhart of Parks Canada may be the "go to" person. Lockhart, Brandy M., Jonathan Moore and Robert Clarke, 2009 New Insights into the Nautical Archaeology of the Hamilton and Scourge. ACUA Underwater Archa
  12. Kevin Crisman of TAMU is Author of "Coffins of the Brave" . Here are the 2 books Sir Frolick mentioned: Cain, Emily. 1983. Ghost Ships: Hamilton and Scourge : Historical Treasures from the War of 1812. Toronto; New York: Musson ; Beaufort Books. Crisman, Kevin James, ed. 2014. Coffins of the Brave: Lake Shipwrecks of the War of 1812. First edition. Ed Rachal Foundation Nautical Archaeology Series in Association with the Institute of Nautical Archaeology and the Center for Maritime Archaeology and Conservation. College Station: Texas A&M University Press. h
  13. There may be some information in the following which documents the restoration of the ECB in 1969 Ansel, Willits Dyer. 1973. Restoration of the Smack Emma C. Berry at Mystic Seaport, 1969-1971. Mystic, Conn: Marine Historical Association. ISBN 978-0-913372-08-1
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