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Jobbie

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About Jobbie

  • Birthday 02/01/1969

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Newcastle, Australia

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  1. As per my Facebook post, I'd personally finish the shrouds and ratlines before anything else. I'd make sure all the blocks that should be under the fitting tops are in place. She's looking great.
  2. Uncharacteristicly, I’ve made a fair bit of progress this weekend. Main wale pre-painted, placement measured from the plans and glued with CA. I’ve also fitted most of the bulwark capping rails.
  3. Sanded. Filled. Cabin facia fitted. Stem fitted. Stern facia fitted. Rudder post fitted. Canon ports cut (Not shown.) She’s starting to have a little colour applied. I’ve spent some time thinking about whether or not to make some stern windows. I’ve decided not to- I quite like the way the kit looks without them.
  4. I reckon I’ll pull up a pew for this one. She looks wonderful, Mike. I loved the reference to the good doctor, too.
  5. Second planking is now complete. I know the method I’ve used is completely incorrect, but I’m happy with how she’s coming along. And I’m enjoying myself. I’ll trim the rubber post and finish the rear counter next.
  6. She looks fantastic, Vane. It would be a shame not to finish her. Although, have you considered completing her in the “Admiralty” style? Stubs of the lower masts with no rigging? It’s just that it looks to me that you’d rather crack on with the three Caldercraft kits instead. You could always return to the Corel kit later?
  7. She’s looking fantastic! I’ve got this kit in my stash, so I’d like to follow the rest of your build. 👍🏼
  8. I’ve not felt the need to add extra planks (stealers) at the stern yet. My shoddy workmanship below the waterline will be sanded, puttied and eventually painted white, hiding a myriad of sins. or should I try copper plating? I don’t believe the original ship would have been coppered. Thoughts?
  9. Drop-planks are a method of careful trimming plank edges into arrow-heads no less than half their full width, so they can be interlocked with adjacent, similarly trimmed planks in order to decrease their total width at the bow. By this method, I’ve been able to trim five planks down together to terminate at one plank-width. It’s the first time I’ve tried it on a kit. It takes a while to do, but I’m pleased with the results so far.
  10. After raising the level of the poop’s bulwarks two planks, I was able to fit eight planks down before I felt the need to begin to taper them. After I’ve cut three further planks at the bow down to half their width, I found the next plank would need to be cut down more than it’s full width allows. The solution? Drop-planks.
  11. I’ve realised I hadn’t built up the height of the quarterdeck planking far enough to meet the front facia or the rear transom’s frames (painted red). So I’m building up a measured half-width plank on either side. Beechwood centre with cyanoacrylate at the lower edge, then walnut inner and outer linings.
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