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Guidance for interpreting plans


Heronguy
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I'm just at the stage of rigging my scale 1:100 Bluenose II from Billing Boats.  This will be the 1st rigging I've ever done.  I'm trying to understand the "diagrammatic instructions" that came with the kit - the written instructions are effectively silent on this process.  I've been reading Frank Mastini's "Ship Modelling Simplified".  I like his suggestion to prepare as much of the rigging before stepping the masts.  Much of the info in that chapter deals with more complicated rigging than is present on my model - one of the reasons I chose the Bluenose II for a 1st build.  I also have a Artesania Latina Bluenose II kit and have been able to use their more detailed plans to help understand the Billing Boats model.  I have Jenson's Bluenose II book for reference.

 

I'm starting to get a feel for the process but I have a couple of simple questions.

 

In this diagram I wonder if it reasonable to run this as one continuous line?

post-26957-0-49457200-1484847915_thumb.jpg

 

I finally decided this diagram was meant to show the standing rigging and that the blocks are just hanging there for eventual use in the running rigging. Since there are no eyes shown to attach the blocks to I presume they can just be tied to the mast. 

post-26957-0-17698700-1484847933_thumb.jpg

 

I have no idea what this inset diagram was meant to convey!  It doesn't seem to correlate to anything on the plan.

post-26957-0-28500200-1484847944_thumb.jpg

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Doug

 

In the first diagram, the lines are made fast to the masts with an eye splice and what appear to be eye bolts so would not be one continuous line.  I think they should actually be rigged to a bail or crane or wye, not to an eye bolt.  

 

In the second drawing the two blocks you show probably are rigged to a second block which would be secured to the clew of a sail, be it a gaff topsail, or some other.    One of the two  could be for the halyard.  Hard to tell, but this drawing appears to be a simplified rigging plan.  If you have a copy of Chappelle's Fishing Schooner book, it shows details of the various styles of rigging in the areas your are asking about.  

 

Allan

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My advice is to do a web search for "schooner topmast" "schooner Triatic stay" "schooner spring stay" , "schooner rigging" etc. then sift through the photos you find. You will find conflicting approaches sometimes but on the other hand traditionally rigged schooners are the most prevalent and numerous tall ship in all the oceans, and you WILL find helpful information.

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Thanks Allan,

 

The appeal (to me) of the continuous line was just that it would  even the tension across the 3 segments and prevent any from sagging if one was more taut then the others.  I'm sure that tying the knots at this scale is not easy to do precisely.  I was mostly curious about that one to know if the real ship would have had some reason for a continuous line (which would then have been another justification for my preference!).  

 

Yes the rigging plan is quite simplified in keeping with the small scale and target audience.  I decoded some of the rigging plan by looking at plans from a larger scale set of plans but it still left me those uncertainties.  I acquired a small library of model building books but Chappelle's Fishing Schooner was not amongst them.  Too bad.  

 

Amazon's "Look Inside" showed me the detail that you were referring too (bail or crane or wye).

 

Doug

Edited by Heronguy
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My advice is to do a web search for "schooner topmast" "schooner Triatic stay" "schooner spring stay" , "schooner rigging" etc. then sift through the photos you find. You will find conflicting approaches sometimes but on the other hand traditionally rigged schooners are the most prevalent and numerous tall ship in all the oceans, and you WILL find helpful information.

 

 

 

Thanks for the suggestions.  I've spent the past hour researching your's and Allan's suggestions.  

 

This is the "problem" with MSW - I spend more time learning about ships fittings than rigging them!!  Good thing this is a hobby!!!!

 

Gratefully,

Doug

 

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