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18th century sailing commands


timboat
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I'm making a 3d model of an 18th century 6th rate frigate for a computer game.  In the game the player has a rather primitive ability to set sail by running up to where the different lines are belayed and selecting a command but I don't really know what to label those commands.  For example, what would be an appropriate command to turn the fore course yard?  I'm thinking it's something like "Haul in Fore Course Starboard Brace" to turn the fore course yard to starboard.  Or to clew up the fore course sail would be "Let Fore Course Tacks and Sheet fly and Haul in Clew Garnets".  I want it to sound authentic so simply "furl fore course sail"/"unfurl fore course sail" won't do.

 

Any suggestions, ideas, comments or thoughts?

 

 

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Prestidigitatus COURSUS!

 

But you'd need to give the player a wand, and call the sailors suggles.

 

Although I haven't sat down with it yet, I saw that Seamanship in the Age of Sail has good clear explanations of ship maneuvers and operations including all the commands.

 

And good luck, below is mine that is still WIP. This is gameplay not artwork, basically a mostly clone of WS&IM.

screenshots_v33_2.thumb.jpg.6ba5f57828c3d9b8748108e4fe557303.jpg

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I've always hoped someone would design a square rigged ship simulator with features like you are describing. As to your question, John Harland goes into the commands given during sail evolutions throughout his book Seamanship in the Age of Sail but I don't think it is information gathered in one place within the book. But when he discusses the work the crew is doing he also mentions the commands given.

usualy on any sailing vessel, the intention to change tacks is indicated by the command "Ready About" announced to all on deck first, then the individual commands are given as necessary to those on the lines in use, at the local level. "Helms Alee" is given loud and clear too, as many of the other tasks performed during a tack are dependent on the timing of changes to the helm.

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7 hours ago, VACorsair said:

Excuse my ignorance, but is that screen shot above from a computer game?  If it is, what game is it from?   It reminds me of the Wooden Ships and Iron Men board game.  

Yes, it's a semi-clone of WS&IM. it's something I am working on, I'm about 80% done.

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The problem your going to run into is that the actual commands were rather general and intended to control the timing of the sequence to accomplish something.  The subordinate commands for the individual lines and movements were not necessary because the crew was trained and proficient in what needed to be done.  So commands like "off tacks and sheets" or "let go and haul" do not contain enough specific information about individual lines.  The lieutenants and bos'n would make sure the proper lines would be hauled or eased as needed.

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20 hours ago, popeye2sea said:

The problem your going to run into is that the actual commands were rather general and intended to control the timing of the sequence to accomplish something.  The subordinate commands for the individual lines and movements were not necessary because the crew was trained and proficient in what needed to be done.  So commands like "off tacks and sheets" or "let go and haul" do not contain enough specific information about individual lines.  The lieutenants and bos'n would make sure the proper lines would be hauled or eased as needed.

So commands where not generally used for individual lines.  What would you call it though if you hauled in clew lines and bunts for an individual sail?  I know it's not "shorten sail" as I would imagine that implies using the sail gaskets to shorten the sails.

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Jack Aubrey: "All brutes ashore! Hurry it up lads! Let us conclude our business here! And watch the paintwork ladies ... Remember, all venereals shall be docked from pay and prize shares, and on that happy aside, the good doctor is now on the half deck, eagerly preparing your comfort ... A moment with Venus, a lifetime with Mercury, I always say ... Prepare to weigh anchor!"

 

Barrett Bondon atop the capstern: "Stamp and go! Stamp and go! The ladies come from Mexico ..."

 

Ok, so I read too much Patrick O'Brien. :)

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