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X-Y Attachment for Dremel


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Hi Folks -- Has anyone attached an X-Y table to their Dremel workstation?  I've been looking at the one listed in the Micro Mark catalogue and wondered if it would work with the Dremel, and if it was worth getting -- if it was a decent piece of equipment.

 

Any other suggestions or recommendations would be welcome!

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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I don't have the one your talking about but I do have the one by Proxxon, which are probably the same but different color. I used it once with the dremel and then got the drill press from Model Expo and use it on that. You just have to get it clamp in so it won't move while you are using it. I would check Ebay first and see if you can get it cheaper before you buy from them, they are over price for there stuff. Also check on Amazon for the Proxxon one and see what the price difference is before you buy, look for the ones that offer free shipping.

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Thanks, Janos & Geoff, those are both good tips.  Actually I read some reviews of the Dremel drill stand, and they made just that same point, that it had too much flex to do the kind of work we need in precsion modelling.  What this means, though, is that my work space is going to start getting pretty crowded (and how long will I be able to hide a drill press from my wife??).

 

And Geoff -- I must ask:  does your dog really help out with your modelling?  He looks like you've worn him out!!

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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And I would like to expand Tom's question to this:  following Janos's comment, I checked out some drill presses at Amazon & Micro Mark.  Apart from the $95 varieties, which I assume would be no more accurate than the Dremel setup, the two premier models are the Micro Mark and Proxxon, which both run at about $250 (and actually the proxxon would be a bit cheaper, since the xy table comes with clamps but the Micro Mark lists them as an additional attachment for $34). 

 

So my question is this:  can I justify investing in a drill press?  How much would I use it, and for what sorts of tasks that I can't take care of with my hand drill or the Dremel?  Right now I'm struggling to drill the holes in the euphroes that have to be an exact and consistent distance from one another.  But will the drill press collect dust until the next time I need to make euphroes?

 

Suggestions, advice, reviews all welcome!

 

Martin

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Check out the proxxon drill press, x-y cross slide, and precision vise at micromart.com  All three abailable for under $400 including shipment. Have found best price at Micromart. The z axis is the up-down movement of the drill head. Go to the proxxon site to take a look of the equipment.......they have vids of the equipment in action.

 

Dremel breaks my heart every time.

 

My two cents.

 

BFN

 

Cheers,

Hopeful aka David

 

“there is wisdom in many voices”

 

Completed: Sharpie Schooner (Midwest) Posted  to the Gallery

 

Current: Sultana (MSW)

Current: Phantom (MSW)

 

Next: Lady Nelson (Amati Victory)

Edited by hopeful
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Martin,

 

    As far as a Mill, check out the ones by Proxxon, they are under a $1000.00 even the ones by Micro Mark are understand a $1000.00. And you could also check out Sherline they are a heck of a lot better but cost more, but for just the Mill they should also be under a $1000.00 also. I have there CNC machine now that is a different story all together, the wife will trow you out for asking ( my wife is Chinese and doesn't understand English that good yet, so I got away with it plus I am the boss LOL ). Check the mills out on Amazon stay away from Ebay since you are not sure of what shape it is really in. But do check out all your options. There is also Taig and Sig. And then www.vanda-layindustries.com I think this would be your best option all around.

Edited by WackoWolf
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Hi WackoWolf -- those Sherline mills & lathes make my mouth water.  I spent a good part of last night dreaming of sugar plums dancing around my new toys.  And this morning I woke up to the reality of having promised myself not to spend more than I can afford.  The Vanda-lay setup is intriguing, and it looks like it would stabilize the errant Dremel, but the stand plus the x table plus the y table -- each of which has to be bought individually -- would end up being almost as much as a Proxxon or MicroMart drill press.  So I guess the question there would be is it worth it?  would I be getting something more, like more capacity to do more things? 

 

David -- thank you for the advice, especially the suggestion abou the video, since as I mentioned my big question is how much will I be able to do?  how good of an investment would this be?

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Martin,

 

It all depends on what you want to do with a “mill”. If you want to be able to cut slots or shapes, then save up your money and get a good mill.  If, on the other hand, you just need to drill holes in a straight line or drill one hole a precise distance from another, then the dermal stand with an x – y table, like I have, works very well.  So you have to decide what you need not what you want.  I've wasted lots of money buying what I wanted because it wasn't needed.

 

Bob

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Ahoy Martin :D

 

I have heard the same regarding the Dremel drill press. It has been called junk on some reviews

 

I too am researching a small tabletop drill press with milling capabilities

 

Proxxon MF70 http://www.proxxontools.com/store/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=63&idcategory=31

One concern is the amount of movement on the table 5-9/32" and 1-13/16"

I have also read that the accuracy/movement of the hand wheels is average. Not bad just not up to a Sherline or Taig

Proxxon also make a drill stand that has recieved excellent reviews (don't think it works with the Dremel) http://www.proxxontools.com/store/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=32&idcategory=33

 

 

The Vanda-lay is a very good looking product http://www.vanda-layindustries.com/html/acra_mill_plus.html

Advantages: 3" and 4" of travel with the Y upgrade. I need to do more research on this product

Cost for a working xyz mill stand ($342.97), this includes a 10% discount on the upgrades but not the base or a Motor tool.  The Proxxon MF70 would cost me (427) at my door making the Vanda Lay slightly more after the tool. The Proxxon Rotary Tool IBS/E being the best choice (the head is better designed for side loading) The Vanda-lay does have more options/functionabilities

 

The Sherline and Taig products are in my option  "overkill" They also require upgrades to get the higher speeds needed to work at our scale. This is a big problem for the Micro Mark and Harbor Freight Mills "no speed upgrades I know of".

 

Speed also a problem for the Nano Machine. http://littlemachineshop.com/products/product_category.php?category=824543683. This site however is an excellent source for upgrades to most of the mills listed above (possibly even speed upgrades for the MM and HF units)

 

 

Right now I am leaning towards the Vanda-lay and using my Dremel 935

 

Mark also had a post reviewing his Mirco Mark unit that I kind of tried to hijack http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/256-micromark-micromill-review/

Edited by JPett
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  So you have to decide what you need not what you want.  I've wasted lots of money buying what I wanted because it wasn't needed.

 

 

Bob -- That's excellent advice.  Really, I should make a sign that says exactly that -- maybe I could dig out my router that I've used maybe 3 times.

 

JPett -- I'll be waiting to hear how you like the Vanda-lay set up.  My only concerns with that is that if it didn't work, ie, if it didn't actually hold the Dremel as steady as it claims to do, then you'd have to go back and spend the same amount on a drill press.  I have a very limited amount of room (my wife is complaining about the Byrnes saw on her sewing table), and am thinking that for now I'm going to try one more shot at drilling holes in a row with what I've got, and if it doesn't work I'll invest in an x-y table, and if the Dremel is still too inaccurate, well, I guess I'll see if the table will fit on the Vanda-lay or something.

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Ahoy Adrieke :D

 

Really, I do not think there is a Drill press/milling machine for the hobbyist. Nevertheless, I still want one

 

A Milling Machine is a tool that is used to shape items by cutting excess away using horizontal movement (X and Y-axis) against a rotating cutter blade called a mill. Some will also cut vertically (Z-axis)

 

A Drill Press holds your drill straight, something humans cannot do

 

Google them for more info and pics. There are also links in my earlier post

 

For me I want a drill press that will allow me to do some milling. One that would hold my Dremel Rotary tool (think dentist drill) and allow me to drill precise holes in precise patterns. Then accept a mill and allow me to make very precise cuts along the wood and at very precise depths.

 

One example

 

Framing a hatch, you can now create the shelf for the crating, miter the ends to build a better box. This done on a piece of wood 1/16 thick. You want treenails in your mitered corners, no problem, use the drill press. They will be straight and exactly where you need them. A mill will allow you to cut wood into shapes you could never do, a drill press to drill the tiniest holes precisely where they need to be.

 

The problem is that a drill press moves the bit downward using an arm or wheel and does not hold a vertical position. A mill uses a threaded rod which is turned and can maintain the same exact vertical position needed for milling. Milling machines are Insanely slow for drilling

 

As you can see these uses are specialized and you will not be using these tools enough to justify their expense. Well at least that is my problem. :P

 

 

Martin: If mount the Proxxon compound table to the Vanda-lay Drill press I might have something. Cost around $230.00 There is a stopper screw that will secure the Dremel's vertical position for milling

 

 

post-108-0-54188900-1366250240.jpg

Edited by JPett
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thanks for the information jpett :) that gives me a better idea of this tool

 

its so confusing for me since it seems lots of tools overlap in functionality .

my aim is to slowly build up some essential powertools and to get experience with them so that when i decide to go from kit buiildign to scratch building i know how to use them :)

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Hi Martin,

 

Bob does have excellent device. Buy the tools you need for the purposes you want.

 

If you buy a mill or lathe, be aware of the overall price creep with "accessories". My 50.00 Unimat was refurbed for 200.00 and I added the mill for 300 more. $550 doesn't sound too bad-till you add in a 4 jaw chuck (125.00), milling vise (60.00), milling table (80.00) and various milling bits, lathe bits, etc. Don't get me wrong, I'm very happy with what I have, but the price of a mill or lathe is just the starting point.

 

OTOH, if you decide you want to scratchbuild, and want to do some of the neat stuff that Danny, Chuck, Ed and others have done, then the price of the lathe and/or mill can be more of an investment.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Thanks,

 

Harvey

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Either way, the finally though is up to you. But I agree with capnharv2, is you want to do scratch then the amount that you spend will be an investment for the next build and so on. Get what you pocket can afford and don't buy something that you will only use maybe once or twice. Jut my option, we are not all in the same boat as everyone else. Power tolls cost money and the add ons cost even more. Beleve me I know.

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When I started my first model, I bought an x-acto and a bottle of glue.  Then I needed some files, then . . .

 

The points made by Harvey & Wacko seem just about right to me:  in a way we're all aiming toward that Scratch-Build that's going to stand next to something David Antscherl might have done.  BUT when, oh when will my skills and even understanding of what to do be at that level??  These machines would be investments to be sure, and some of the ones I've looked at on different sites (Sherline) are downright beautiful and would make my boatyard all the more attractive (and crowded).  But for now the challenge is to get my basic skills up to the level where having something like a mill would actually make sense.

 

I cut out the blocks for my gun rigging by hand, and boy I can tell you that Chuck's definitely look easier and less time-consuming and nicer than what I got.  I just bought a supply of blocks from Lloyd Warner, because that experience taught me that I could either spend the next 3 months carving blocks or get on with the rigging itself.

 

JPett -- I think we're on the same page (and even the same model!) -- If that Vanda-lay mount does indeed work to keep the Dremel tight enough to drill with real, real accuracy -- enough to make the x-y table matter -- then it would seem to be a good step up from the pin-vise in a home-made jig (which is what I'm trying to devise right now, and if it works, I'll post a picture).  And the Proxxon table does seem to be the one to go with.  If you get it, let me know ASAP, 'cause I just might be able to justify that -- at least until I start a thread with a title like "Kingfisher Scratch-Build at 1:48"

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Ahoy Martin :D

 

 

 

It is a real conundrum. As someone who has enjoyed working with tools his whole life, I know there are other forces at work here.

 

 

 

Do I buy the tool to satisfy my needs or my ego?

 

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Just to complicate matters, JPett, let me toss this in:  if at least some ego wasn't at work, we'd end up making slapdash models.  And if it brings you joy, then I say go for it!  (And just to emphsize my point:  I have a horse, 3 saddles, 4 pairs of boots, and I don't know how many bridles and bits -- and I love 'em all)

 

And I could also say that you could get the tool and try it out for the benefit of all the rest of us --- HAR!  :dancetl6:

 

Cheers,

 

Martin

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Ahoy Martin

 

OK :P

 

Ordered the Drill Press plus from Vanda-lay

 

Three weeks for delivery which is fine for me

 

Should order the Proxxon Micro Compound table KT70 in the next few days. I see there are some other choices that I want to research.  

 

http://littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=1765&category=

 

Double the price and it might be overkill but like I said. Need to do some research

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The Littlemachine X-Y table looks great and has oil catch tray which the Proxxon does not have.  But watch out for those dimensions.  I once bought an X – Y table that had a vice on top that you could angle upwards only to find out it was too big for my drill press.

 

Bob

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Ahoy Bob :D

 

It weighs 47 pounds

 

I am really leaning towards the proxxon. It will be for the hobby "closet"

 

But I am searching the web to see if there is another. The amount of movement on the Proxxon is a slight concern

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Martin,

 

To help us assist you better, please let us know what you intend to make using a mill and at what scale, generally speaking.  In terms of investment, ask yourself this question, what percent of a vessel is made using a mill?

 

I had all the same questions you have before I made the plunge and purchased a lathe and mill. Can one build a fine looking vessel with out those tools, absolutely positively yes and,  builders have done so for ions.

 

I live in Canada. We import everything. When I order from outside Canada I have to pay money exchange, shipment, duty, freight, and taxes. My tools help me be self sufficient. That is the real reason I have tools. I can't go to the store here and get what I need, so more and more I make what I need. If I buy $20 worth of stuff from Model expo I pay $50 in shipping, lol!

 

If you want stuff you can't afford at this time wait until you can and just keep building. The truth is, you get what you pay for when it comes to tools.

 

My two cents.

 

Hopeful aka David

Edited by hopeful
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