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I am paint my second kit (MS Norwegian Pram) with the MS paints it came with.  Purchased in April.

 

Paint seems thick and not well mixed even after a good shake.  I have read threads here about acrylics I general, and a little about Model Shipways specifically.

 

What is the best way to mix and thin this paint?  Is water good, or should I use something else?  I’ve noticed other brands have brand-specific thinners.

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I have successfully thinned it with tap water, but personally I don't like their paint. As you observed it is very thick. If you have the MicroMark battery operated pencil sized paint mixer it works very well stirring their paint as well as other brands. I use the stirrer all the time.

 

Cordless paint mixer

Edited by Jack12477
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53 minutes ago, Jack12477 said:

I have successfully thinned it with tap water, but personally I don't like their paint. As you observed it is very thick. If you have the MicroMark battery operated pencil sized paint mixer it works very well stirring their paint as well as other brands. I use the stirrer all the time.

 

Cordless paint mixer

How much paint remains on the mixer when done stirring?

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2 hours ago, rudybob said:

How much paint remains on the mixer when done stirring?

Not much. I just spin mine a few times in a jar of water or thinner and anything left comes right off. Then wipe dry with paper towel or cloth rag.

Edited by Jack12477
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2 minutes ago, Mark m said:

wonder if anyone has a Dremel attachment for this.

The Dremel reason for being is rotational speed.   There was an old Mad Magazine full page ad parody of a guy with a wooden mallet, an open can, a tomato,  and tomato pulp covering everything.   ~" I'm the guy how gets the 10 giant tomatoes packed into each can."

 

A slower speed battery rotational driver with a chuck might be safer at keeping the liquid in the bottle.  Bamboo skewers with a slit to hold a wing may work as well.  A different skewer could be used for each color, so the cleaning step could be avoided.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I always use a acrylic thinner for Model Expo paints , but they need 3 coats to get good coverage. I don’t have a problem with their paints, but will try AK Interactive paints or Tamaya paint. I use laundry detergent to clean my brushes and airbrush. They come out nice and clean and soft. I put a little detergent in my hand and scrub my brush in it then water.

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On 8/7/2022 at 12:29 PM, Jack12477 said:

Not much. I just spin mine a few times in a jar of water or thinner and anything left comes right off. Then wipe dry with paper towel or cloth rag.

Just make sure the paint-covered mixer is in the jar of water or thinner before you start spinning it. (Don't ask me how I know this! :D )

 

For those who may be new to painting, it should be understood that most all "coatings," (paints and varnishes) will require "conditioning" before use. Paint that is "thick" is often an indication of good quality, since it is the pigment that causes the consistency and it's the pigment that's the most costly ingredient in the paint. Thin paint just contains more cheap solvent ingredients. Why anybody would buy thinned paint for airbrushing at the same price as thicker "regular" paint is beyond me.  It's sort of like buying a fifth of pre-mixed "bourbon and water" for the same price as a fifth of 80 proof! :D 

 

Paints, particularly, are almost never suitable for use "right out of the can" and will require "conditioning" regardless of whether it's to be applied by brushing or spraying, Conditioning usually at least consists of thinning, but can also include adding "levelers" or "retarders" which retard drying or "driers" which accelerate drying. Thinners for acrylics are generally water and alcohol in various proportions. (Adding water to acrylic coatings is often a bad move, since the water takes a while to evaporate and can end up making a mess. Alcohol is preferred, particularly for airbrushing, because it evaporates quickly.)

 

 

Edited by Bob Cleek
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