Jump to content

DSiemens

Members
  • Content Count

    1,154
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About DSiemens

  • Birthday 04/12/1985

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Denver Co
  • Interests
    Sailing Ships, Ships in Bottles

Recent Profile Visitors

1,523 profile views
  1. Now for some deck furniture. Before I start I'd like to point out that the technique I use I learned from John Fox III. He told me to break down the objects into their individual shapes. For instance when you look at a cannon the main shapes are a cylinder that sits on a rectangular box. By breaking down the shapes of objects it makes them easier to model at a small scale. One other note. One thing I do starting out with deck furniture is mark where the mast is going. You don't want to put a hatch or a deck house right where the mast is supposed to be. So I put a small pencil mark where the mast will be. The first piece I'll work on for this ship is the helm. Breaking down the shapes for this helm, it will have a rectangular box that holds the helm and a circular object that is the helm. The box is easy enough I cut a piece of wood into a tiny box that fits the size I want and glue it in place. The circular piece it harder. It's hard to get circles small enough to fit the scale. One of the great techniques of ship in bottle building though is to use found objects that fit the pieces you need. Just as old sailors used bottles and wood scraps that were otherwise garbage on the ship, there is often objects lying around that can work for ships in bottles. One technique I like a lot for helms is going down to the watch repair store and asking for spare gears. Watch gears make very good helms. We'll cover found objects more when I get to the cannons. If you don't have access to a watch store there is another method that can be done with string. Take a piece of string and tie loose knot. Then slowly tighten that knot into a loop that is the size of the helm. Glue it down and trim off the edges. Any left over edges glue into the circle so you have a nice round piece of string. Then the piece of string is glued on to the rectangular box that holds up the helm. Report post (IP: 97.118.17.116) Posted June 5, 2018 Now for some deck furniture. Before I start I'd like to point out that the technique I use I learned from John Fox III. He told me to break down the objects into their individual shapes. For instance when you look at a cannon the main shapes are a cylinder that sits on a rectangular box. By breaking down the shapes of objects it makes them easier to model at a small scale. One other note. One thing I do starting out with deck furniture is mark where the mast is going. You don't want to put a hatch or a deck house right where the mast is supposed to be. So I put a small pencil mark where the mast will be. The first piece I'll work on for this ship is the helm. Breaking down the shapes for this helm, it will have a rectangular box that holds the helm and a circular object that is the helm. The box is easy enough I cut a piece of wood into a tiny box that fits the size I want and glue it in place. The circular piece it harder. It's hard to get circles small enough to fit the scale. One of the great techniques of ship in bottle building though is to use found objects that fit the pieces you need. Just as old sailors used bottles and wood scraps that were otherwise garbage on the ship, there is often objects lying around that can work for ships in bottles. One technique I like a lot for helms is going down to the watch repair store and asking for spare gears. Watch gears make very good helms. We'll cover found objects more when I get to the cannons. If you don't have access to a watch store there is another method that can be done with string. Take a piece of string and tie loose knot.  Then slowly tighten that knot into a loop that is the size of the helm.  Glue it down and trim off the edges. Any left over edges glue into the circle so you have a nice round piece of string. Then the piece of string is glued on to the rectangular box that holds up the helm.   One thing to keep in mind is you don't need a perfect helm. With the location and size chances are no one will even notice how the helm is modeled. When it comes to modeling ships this size the details can be left out. Often I find the mind has a way of recognizing the shapes and filling in the details. So how far you take those details is up to you. Personally I like the challenge. In reality you could glue in the rectangular box with no helm and chances are no one would know the difference. Moving forward I modeled a small deck house. It's more of a raised hatch on this ship. The picture below is a good example of what this looks like and the Bermuda sloop deck in general. The hatch just forward of the helm is made up of a box with a tilted top. This top stick out over the edges slightly. So to model it I cut a piece of wood into a box, sand the top down and glue on some paper strips on top. Then with a pencil I made a mark for the hinges. Looking at this photo know I think I have the helm in the wrong place. All well it's already glued in. Another important tip. You are the captain of this ship and things go where you want them to go. You can follow my instructions or do it your own way. What ever makes you the captain the happiest with your work. After the deck house I put in a couple hatches. I can't remember if this is a Jim Goodwin technique or a Greg Alvey technique. I learned it from one of them. Any way, first I find some plans for hatches. I googled it and found some that I pasted into word and copied and resized the photo to a lot of various sizes. With the varied sizes I can makes hatches for a variety of ships by printing one page of hatches. The word file I used for this ship is attached. Once I have the hatches printed I turn the page over and lightly stain the back of the page. That way the ink doesn't run. The wood stain gives it a wood color and the ink makes it look like a hatch. Then I cut out the hatch and glue it on the hull. For this I use white glue. This allows me plenty of time to put the hatch in position. If you use super glue and the hatch goes down crooked it becomes a big mess.
  2. The planking method works well and I think it looks good. I cut some paper at 1.5 mm stained it with golden oak and glued it in place. I started from the outside edges and worked in. I also stained the hull with golden oak. From there I did the windows. One of the best ways to do windows is to print off windows from plans and glue them onto the model. My printers down at the moment so I hand drew some windows. I took a darker stain and stained a strip of paper for the door.
  3. Thanks Carl. So the next part is adding on to the stern bulwarks. I cut out part of the plans to get the sizing that I needed and then cut out a piece of wood to glue in place. I soak the wood for a couple minutes and then glued it to the top of the bulwark. After I send the bulwark down I work on the rail to go on top of the stern bulwark. I cut out another 1.5 mm piece soak it for a a few minutes and then do a grain break at the very end to give that lip between the two rails. Then I glue it in place. I sand that piece down to thin it out and then move on to the stern cabin. I start with the front of the cabin that will be on deck cut out a piece that fits in the place where the cabin will be and then sand the top edges to round it out. I decided to cut out the door on this model this is more for my own experimentation it doesn't have to be done as part of the beginners build. For the door typical I'd go out a piece of paper paint it and then glue it in place I wanted to try this out since the cabin is open and I will glue the door hinged open so that it looks like you can walk inside. After the front of the cabin was placed I put in the back of the cabin this is kind of the same thing placing the piece sanding off the top edges to round them out and gluing it on.
  4. Found one recently is a family history book that I now use on my kids. It was originally in Low German but translates to, "If you don't use your head you're going to have to use your feet."
  5. Great work. I love the pendants as well. Its a very nice touch. She'll look great in the bottle.
  6. In case any ones wondering the site is down for the next couple days while the host updates their servers. We'll be back up Monday.
  7. A little more progress.... In regards to the windows the book calls for tin foil painted with transparent blue paint. I didn't have any transparent blue and paint didn't seem to stick to the aluminum foil so I just used the foil as is. I had thought I saw the window cross hatch pattern before and found it again in some lace. I ended up cutting the windowsills out of paper and then glueing them onto the foil with the lace inbetween. Once the glue dried I cut the window out of the foil, painted the sills and put it on the ship.
  8. A bit more work done. I decided to go with paint on deck. I could have planked it but I figured id follow the book on this one. I went light so that it still has an aged look. The lighter deck does make the rest of the ship pop out more. Got the head boards redone and in place as well as the cat heads. Interestingly enough the book caled for a touch of silver on the head boards so ibpainted that on. It does give a little more depth. Got all the gun port lids replaced. With the exception of the stern I'm about ready for rigging. I've been cutting off the old rigging here and there saving the dead eyes and blocks, at least those that don't fall apart.
  9. Thank you for the comments. I agree bdb accuracy is not the goal here at all. Ours funny because McCann mentions that in his book. Instead of building cross trees he has the builder use thread to tie the masts together. He called it throwing seaman ship to the wind. He meant it to be simple not accurate. Actually after reading through the book I'm somewhat surprised there aren't any McCann style builds on this forum. For some one wanting to learn scratch building its a great start. I picked up a bit of paint and went to touching up some spots. I want to keep the model looking old so I used a dry brush technique. Wetting the brush the painting on a piece of paper until the paint was almost gone and then painting the model. I need better lighting but you can see how the colors come out but not by to much. I then turned my attention to the stern. I'm not sure what the original artist was going for. I decided to change this up all together. I was given a color photo of a magazine cover for this ship. Here you can see the two lions on top per the book and a pegasus. The book says to get a picture from a cigar box or catholic literature. I looked at some from the 1930s and got some good ideas. I like the pegasus though so I looked up 1930 pegasus. What I found was interesting. This pegasus looks very similar to the one on the magazine cover. So I think that's what I'll use. I went ahead and painted the stern and added the two lions per the book. The stern is somewhat different as built but I think I can mix the book plans in just enough to look good.
  10. So a friend of mine started brewing beer at work. It seemed like a lot of fun so I thought I'd try it out. Trouble is I dont drink. A ship in bottle builder that doesn't drink!...shocking I know. So I turned to root beer. I didn't want the old McCormick concentrate though I wamted real root beer. So I dove through the web trying to find a good root beer recipe. After seven awful batches I concluded that all of the recipes on line are complete garbage. I tried ones with cinnamon, some with lime juice, raisins, licorice root and winter green. They were all horrible. So I went to the very basics. Sasafrass, sugar and water. What I got was a great tasting very sweet root beer. It was different. It was root beer but sweeter. As I dug around learning about root beer I found some interesting things. First off was the FDA study in the 1960's. Sasafrass root was known to be an ingredient in drugs so to stop the drug problem the FDA loaded up some rats on Sasfarole an oil found in sasafrass. The rats got cancer and they labled it a carcinogen. Never mind to get the equivelent reaction in a human they would need to drink fifty gallons of root beer a day. Root beer companies had to find ways get the sasforole out of sasafrass or go with a different recipe. What I found was the big root beers like Barqs and A&W actually use sasparilla and not sasafrass. Which makes me wonder if sasparilla became the new staple in root beer after the 1960's. Its easier to use than having to refine sasafrass. Thats what made mine unique. I bought sasafrass online which I was surprised they could sell but it provided a slightly different flavor. With quiet a few more tests I found a recipe that really tasts great. 1 quart water 1/4 cup sasafrass 1 tablespoon sasparilla 1 table spoon vanilla 3 cups sugar 2 quarts sparkling water Put quart of water in stove and heat it, add s asafrass, sasparilla and vanilla. When it come to a boil turn the heat down and let it simmer for 20 minutes. Drain it through a strainer to get the root chuncks out. For really clear root beer strain through cheese cloth. While its still hot add the sugar and stir until it dissolves. Let it cool in freezer for an hour or so then add the sparkling water for carbination. Other carbonation methods work too. You can boil it in 3 quarts of water if carbenating in another way. I found the sparkling water method works for me. So thats my old school root beer. Let me know if you have a good recipe I'm willing to try them out. Its been a lot of fun and there's nothing like modeling ships with a home made glass of root beer.
  11. Theres a lot of phrases in this book like that. Like belt pins. Captain McCann made a lot of use of belt pins. From what I can tell I think they are called straight pins today. I could be wrong.
  12. That is true. The one commonly attributed to Blackbeard is described as one flown by a Francis Spriggs. Some of the flags did exist in one form or other. It just takes a lot of research to find the historical evidence. The clickbate prone internet makes it very difficult.
  13. There is little historical evidence for a lot of the flags that are attributed to pirates. Historians traced the appearance of the common flags to the 1950's. http://www.piratesurgeon.com/pages/surgeon_pages/memento_mori6.html
  14. I have had an interest for some time in the E. Armitage McCann models and always thought I'd try one someday. I came across a 1927 version of his Pirate fellucca and Spanish Galleon book on Amazon for $11 and decided to make the purchase. It was in great condition for a 91 year old book. It even had the plans in the back sleeve. A friend of mine if the Rocky Mountain Ship wrights happened to be restoring a McCann Constitution so I thought I'd show it to him. He recognized it right away as he has a 1926 copy and he asked how interested I was in building a McCann model. I told him I was very interested. He then told me he had a Spanish Galleon that needed some restoration amd that if I planned on restoring it he would let me have it. I jumped at the chance. I love old ship models. The older the better. I spent a bit of money on a 1915 ship in bottle just to have one from the era when ships in bottles became popular. So owneing an old McCann style model was right up my alley. Admitably I started work on her right away. So this is after some clean up but here she is. Note the receipt. The ship was sold at one point in 1973 so I know it is at least that old. To the best of my knowledge it between 50 to 90 years old. It is incredibly fragile. The rigging about fell apart looking at it. All of the rigging needs to be redone. Its bowsprit was broken and in need of repair. Surprisingly all cannons were present. Some of the stern sections were broken off and needed replacing. I have my work cut out for me. Good news is I have the 91 year old instruction manual. Bad news is I don't think theres such a thing as a notions counter anymore. 😜 I've been pouring through the book getting an idea of what goes where. The original builder stayed pretty close to the book but did do his own thing on some parts. I plan on doing a mix of the two. Bring some parts closer to the book and leave some parts as the builder had them. I started with the rigging. It all has to be removed. I saved what dead eyes I could but they are equally fragile. I may need to buy a celluloid knitting needle to teplace them as recomended by McCann. I then turned my attention to the deck. McCann states it should be a lighter color. The original builder painted it dark. This is where thing got a little funny as the admiral looking over my shoulder said, "The deck isnt right, its to dark." I told her I was thinking that and thought about painting it lighter per the book. She said, "No, you have taught me to much. It won't look right unless you plank it." She is right, theres nothing better than a nicely planked deck but, this is a McCann model. It was supposed to be simple. I fear my club and I have raised the admirals expectations in ship models. I guess thats not all bad. I'm still stuck in the middle on this idea but I purchased some wood to plank it with. (I needed more ship in bottle veneer anyway) From there I investigated the deck. With a little sanding I found,the upper decks are wood. I can sand them down to the wood and call it good. The main deck however is a some sort of composite and doesn't have a wood grain. The main deck will need planking. I purchased some wood from cards of wood that is paper thin. If I do plank it the increased height of the deck will be very minimal. Thats the question though. Do I paint it per the book or plank it because it would look better? I would plan on a weathered look on the planking to keep this ship looking old. There's a lot of charm in an old ship model and I don't want to lose that.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...