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Hi all

I'd like to show you these pics, taken two days after the 3rd, final application of a special shining ointment for metals.

How you can see, some "dirty"-corrosive spot arised despite me intense care to apply the cream onto the whole surface of the tiles.

My aim was to "seal" (after the cream application and polish) my shinning coppering with two layers of varnish for metals just to protect the copper against the odidation etc....but know I really dont know what to do...

Any help/suggestion from anyone copper-specialist on this issue? How can I solve this problem with those two-speed corrosive tiles?

Thank you so much in advance. 

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It looks to me like the copper wasn't de-greased well enough before you started polishing. Some of those marks look very much like fingerprints. Skin oils are notorious for staining highly polished metal.

 

I'm not sure I can recommend a perfect solution, but I would remove the layers of polish. I would clean with something like acetone to try remove the grease. Be very careful you don't use too much as it will loosen the adhesive of the copper tiles.  

 

Sorry I can't be more help, don't rush into anything, wait a day or two and perhaps there will be others here with a better suggestion..

 

Dan.

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I assume the problem is the dark areas. I had a similar problem and decided to not seal my copper as once it is you're  stuck. The only option would be to pull the offenders off, and replace with ones of the same finish. I've done the pull out and replace thing. It wasn't bad, but practice on a test piece first as it was a very delicate thing to do to not cause further damage. I don't know if it would have gone well if I'd used CA glue. Then it might take a peeling motion that ruins the overlaping edges. Try it out if you need to on a test and see if you can pull out instead of peeling. You might luck out.

 

I simply re- cleaned the bad spots. It's been several months now and it's all looking the same. If the difference is too bad on the cleaned spots the whole hull needs to be re-cleaned. I used Brasso, then an autobody pre-cleaner for auto painting to remove it's residue. No sealer will keep it shiney forever.

 

Von Stetina

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After all, one way or another, coppering marathon is finished...

I've used as a final polish product a layer of brasso plus two additional coatings of metal varnish to protect it.

I'm curious to see the short to mid term results...

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I once lost an argument about what color the copper below the waterline should be. Then as now I prefer the beautiful verdigris green color of the Statue of Liberty. I used to argue that the color of the coppered bottom of a sailing ship would be this delicate light green color. Facts proved me wrong however when photos of the  Constitution in dry dock emerged showing the mottled brown color of her copper. Something about the underwater nature of the oxidation at work did NOT result in the pale green color I was sure must exist on a coppered hull. To add to confusion, Pride of Baltimore II has a pale green bottom paint that matches what I had expected actual copper to look like and if you google her you may find photos of her in drydock showing this more lovely color. I support your decision to go with a mirror bright polished finish though. You are making a statement about the materials used in the model and showing an honesty about those materials.

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Hi,

In regard to these comments about copper bottoms,  I don't particularly like very bright copper, but I don't like the mottled blue and bright finish seen in many pictures.  I have done one or two bottoms using copper tape, not individual tiles, and did not have trouble with discoloration. Tape doesn't need cleaning either.  What I did was use garnet shellac, somewhat darker than the usual orange shellac, immediately after finishing the application, both to protect the copper and to tone down the color.

 

Chazz

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Hi,

In regard to these comments about copper bottoms,  I don't particularly like very bright copper, but I don't like the mottled blue and bright finish seen in many pictures.  I have done one or two bottoms using copper tape, not individual tiles, and did not have trouble with discoloration. Tape doesn't need cleaning either.  What I did was use garnet shellac, somewhat darker than the usual orange shellac, immediately after finishing the application, both to protect the copper and to tone down the color.

 

Chazz

....shellac?

What's that Chazz?

Thanks

 

Stergios

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Dear colleagues, it is necessary to apply a varnish as a sheeting to a copper covering carefully as over time under the influence of external factors the varnish has property to become covered by cracks and облазить from a surface (it depends on type and quality of an applied varnish and durability of its coupling with a copper covering). The model thus takes a modest form - a similar example on a photo (Superb model). Many modellers prefer to leave a copper covering without a sheeting, over time (within a year - two) it darkens naturally and gains beautiful dark more or less uniform color.

 

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The finish you got looks superb indeed, but you are building a ship model, aren't you, and this hull is so flashy that you don't even notice the beautiful work you did or are doing on the rest of the ship.  As an example, you have a beautiful flat black finish for your ship sides in (too) sharp contra&st with the lower hull...

 

Just my grit of salt

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I once lost an argument about what color the copper below the waterline should be. Then as now I prefer the beautiful verdigris green color of the Statue of Liberty. I used to argue that the color of the coppered bottom of a sailing ship would be this delicate light green color. Facts proved me wrong however when photos of the  Constitution in dry dock emerged showing the mottled brown color of her copper. Something about the underwater nature of the oxidation at work did NOT result in the pale green color I was sure must exist on a coppered hull. To add to confusion, Pride of Baltimore II has a pale green bottom paint that matches what I had expected actual copper to look like and if you google her you may find photos of her in drydock showing this more lovely color. I support your decision to go with a mirror bright polished finish though. You are making a statement about the materials used in the model and showing an honesty about those materials.

I love the verdigris color too. My argument  to those that say it should be brown because copper only turns green when it's exposed to air is that it's on a stand and no where near any water so of course it's going to turn green!

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Ahoy Stergios :D

 

Beautiful build, I think it looks great

 

I am a fan of the "clean" copper look and would question that after plating, would the ship have not looked this way. I might tone it down just a bit with some compound but that is just my personal taste.

 

I am unaware of any painting or treatment to the copper plating when first applied, was there?. As for the weathered look I like that too but have seen the lower half of a build overly weathered and the top half looking like it just rolled off the dry-dock. Not too fond of that

 

Edited by JPett
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Stergios,

Shellac is an old wood finish used for fine finishes that has been largely superseded by lacquer and varnishes. Its a resin secreted by a beetle that is dissolved in alcohol and dries very quickly. It comes in colors from white (clear) to dark orange (garnet) and is fairly transparent. It can be removed easily and entirely with more alcohol, but is quite durable when dry.

It comes as a powder, or premixed.

 

Use the translator in Google if you can get it up. I don't have any way to print the Greek characters.

 

Chazz

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The finish you got looks superb indeed, but you are building a ship model, aren't you, and this hull is so flashy that you don't even notice the beautiful work you did or are doing on the rest of the ship.  As an example, you have a beautiful flat black finish for your ship sides in (too) sharp contra&st with the lower hull...

 

Just my grit of salt

 

Jean-Pierre

the shinning of copper is'nt the same, cause I've applied the coatings of varnish.

I've applied two coatings of matt varnish to the flat black hull...

Pics to follow later!

Edited by Stergios
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Ahoy Stergios :D

 

Beautiful build, I think it looks great

 

I am a fan of the "clean" copper look and would question that after plating, would the ship have not looked this way. I might tone it down just a bit with some compound but that is just my personal taste.

 

I am unaware of any painting or treatment to the copper plating when first applied, was there?. As for the weathered look I like that too but have seen the lower half of a build overly weathered and the top half looking like it just rolled off the dry-dock. Not too fond of that

Thanks JPet

The whole looking is already changed. Coppering finish is'nt so bright, in the other hand I've applied a matt varnish over the black hull...

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Stergios,

Shellac is an old wood finish used for fine finishes that has been largely superseded by lacquer and varnishes. Its a resin secreted by a beetle that is dissolved in alcohol and dries very quickly. It comes in colors from white (clear) to dark orange (garnet) and is fairly transparent. It can be removed easily and entirely with more alcohol, but is quite durable when dry.

It comes as a powder, or premixed.

 

Use the translator in Google if you can get it up. I don't have any way to print the Greek characters.

 

Chazz

Copy that Chazz!

Many thanks.

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  • 2 years later...

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