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Putting a loop on block ends


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At a very small scale, you can take the tackle thread and tie it to the strap thread before you strap the block. Then wrap the strap around the block with the tackle thread already in place on the **** end of the block. Once you seize the tackle thread, it will be difficult to tell that you did not use the becket (loop) on the end of the block. It will also look less bulky. 

 

Russ

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2 hours ago, russ said:

At a very small scale, you can take the tackle thread and tie it to the strap thread before you strap the block. Then wrap the strap around the block with the tackle thread already in place on the **** end of the block. Once you seize the tackle thread, it will be difficult to tell that you did not use the becket (loop) on the end of the block. It will also look less bulky. 

 

Russ

I’m sorry, I am not understanding your reply. “ you can take the tackle thread and tie it to the strap thread before you strap the block “ that has me confused.

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The tackle thread is what runs from block to block. That is what would be seized or tied to the loop you mention. Instead of making the loop, just tie the tackle thread onto the strap before the strap is put on the block. Then put the strap on the block so that the tackle thread is on the **** end of the block. This would eliminate the loop but the tackle thread is still secured to the block. 

 

Russ

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On smaller models, those with very small blocks,  my advice is to use wire to Strop the blocks, not thread.  Forming an eye in wire by twisting is very easy in comparison to trying to tie loop knots in thread and few will be able to notice it is wire not thread. Black Bead Stringing Wire can be purchased online or at craft stores.

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For small blocks, like 1/16 or 1/8 in., with wire strops, there is little need for an explicit eye. Strop the block without an eye and drill a tiny hole (#76 or #80 bit) at the ****end or otherwise work a hole with a pin or other sharp tool.  The wire can be forced out some if you'd like a little more explicit look to the block. You can also put a wire at the end of the block and run the strop wire over it, but I find thar a little unnecessary work.

 

Chazz

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Here’s some photos illustrating wire stropping used to mimic rope stropping. In the lower left of one shot are two thread stropped blocks, which took a considerably longer time to produce but would be considered more “literally” “authentic”, meaning they’re more of a true miniaturization of a real rope stropped block since their strops are made of fiber line. But the wire stropped blocks look very good in comparison despite “faking” the material used in a strop. The other photo illustrates how rediculously easy it is to form a loop in wire. I’m guessing you can turn out three or four wire stropped blocks in the time it takes to strop one fiber line stropped block. 

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