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Scale conversion


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In the most basic way of looking at it, 5/32" = 1 foot is the same as 5/32"=12".  Rearranging you get 5" = (12 x 32) or 5" = 384" which gives about 1"=76.8" (or 1:76.8).  What the 1:x gives is how many units (in this case inches) at full size are represented by 1 inch at scale size.  Also works for mm, cm, cubits etc.

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Wouldn't have a clue - The AP has a custom scale option, feed in your numbers and see if it works. I have found the AP meets all my needs, so far in modelling. I thought it might be useful for others who may not have heard of it or used it. Seems to cover all the common scales. If it doesn't seem useful to you don't download it.

Edited by hornet
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dont understand this one but 1/4 = 1/25 so 5/32 = 1/64 so if you building a model thats 7/32 of the real thing then the scale would be 1/4571. you simply divide the second number by the first, but not quite sure if thats what your asking

Edited by williamDB
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i may be stupid but it doesn`t make any sense. for example ratio for 1/8 of an inch = 1/125 but the ratio of 1/8 of a foot is still 1/125

Since the scales for model building are given in a couple of ways (1/8" scale or 1:96 scale) it sometimes becomes necessary to find the ration (1:96) from a fractional inch (1/8").

 

The method Stuntflyer shows takes the fraction (1/8) does the division to get a decimal (0.125).  Since 0.125" = 1 foot at scale, and not sure why this works but it does, divide 12 inches per foot by the decimall (0.125) to get the ratio 1:96 (1 inch scale = 96 inches real).

 

Also works for other scales -

 

1/4"=1 foot becomes 12/0.25 = 1:48

3/32"=1foot becomes 12/0.9375 = 1:128

1/16" = 1 foot is 1:192

1/2" = 1 foot is 1:24 and so on.

 

This may not work as neatly when converting metric - haven't attempted that part yet!

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I works for any unit of measure because it is a ratio.  As long as you convert both sides of the equation to the same unit you can calculate it.  The method as Bob state above is to put the same unit of measure on both sides of the equation and cross multiply.  Wayne is doing the same thing, just doing part of it in his head and not realizing.

 

1/8" scale is the same as saying

1/8" = 1ft.      original ratio

=  1/8'= 12"/1    putting 1 foot into inches

 cross multiply

 

1 x 1 = 1 and 8 x 12 = 96

 

= 1:96

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Since the scales for model building are given in a couple of ways (1/8" scale or 1:96 scale) it sometimes becomes necessary to find the ration (1:96) from a fractional inch (1/8").

 

The method Stuntflyer shows takes the fraction (1/8) does the division to get a decimal (0.125).  Since 0.125" = 1 foot at scale, and not sure why this works but it does, divide 12 inches per foot by the decimall (0.125) to get the ratio 1:96 (1 inch scale = 96 inches real).

 

Also works for other scales -

 

1/4"=1 foot becomes 12/0.25 = 1:48

3/32"=1foot becomes 12/0.9375 = 1:128

1/16" = 1 foot is 1:192

1/2" = 1 foot is 1:24 and so on.

 

This may not work as neatly when converting metric - haven't attempted that part yet!

understand now, sober today lol

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I apologize if I made anybody feel stupid.  For many years I was a research professor in a medical school, and occasionally I was recruited to teach either in a lecture hall and/or in the laboratory.  Those are two very different places and different crowds.

 

Well, I'll tell you, that when I was faced with 50--150 bright faces, then I learned that  'There are no stupid questions, but there are many stupid answers.'  

 

It's a matter of understanding what a student is asking, what the student knows, and then explaining how a problem can be solved.  But it's more than that -- it's about teaching a student how to learn about how to solve a problem on their own, when nobody else is around to ask for help.

Edited by Bob Blarney
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