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Cruizer-class Brig-Sloops of the Royal Navy


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#21
Dave Fellingham

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Cruizers, part 5:  HMS Epervier

 

The Cruizer-class brig-sloop HMS Epervier (French for sparrow hawk) launched in December 1812, commissioned in January 1813 under Commander Richard Walter Wales and assigned to the Halifax station.

 

On 20 August 1813, she captured the schooner Lively followed by Active on 20 September.  Three days later Epervier, Majestic and Wasp captured Resolution.  On 5 October, Epervier and Fantome captured the American privateer Portsmouth Packet and on 3 November, they captured the Peggy

 

On 23 February 1814, Epervier captured the American privateer brig Alfred off Cape Sable, the southern-most point of mainland Florida.  Alfred, which carried 16 x long 9 pound guns and a crew of about 100, surrendered without a fight.  HMS Junon (38) was also within sight.  While returning to Halifax with Alfred, Commander Wales learned of a plot between some of the crew of Epervier and the prisoners to take over one or both vessels and escape to America.  Wales arrived in Halifax two days later after sailing through a gale.  There he notified his commanding officer (who was also his uncle), Admiral Sir John Borlase Warren, that he did not trust his crew.  Warren dismissed Wales’ concerns and gave him orders for Epervier to escort a small convoy to Bermuda and the West Indies in company with the schooner Shelburne.  Before leaving on 3 March, Wales exchanged her 2 x 6 pound chase guns and 12 pounder carronade boat gun for 2 x 18 pounder carronade boat guns.2

 

On 14 April, Epervier sailed from Port Royal, Jamaica in company with a merchant brig bound for Bermuda; they stopped at Havana, Cuba where Epervier took on board $118,000 in coins.  They left for Bermuda on 25 April.  Early in the morning of 29 April, a Russian merchant ship going to Boston joined the convoy.  Shortly after that, another ship appeared to the southwest in pursuit.  This was the USS Peacock.

 

USS Peacock’s Specifications

Length:  119 ft

Beam:  31 ft 6 inches

Tonnage:  509 (burthen)

Rig:  ship-rigged sloop

Armament:  20 x 32 pounder carronades + 2 x 12 pounder chase guns

Complement:  166

 

Peacock was one of three new 22-gun flush-decked ship-rigged sloops-of-war that entered US Navy service in the fall and winter of 1813, the other two being Frolic and WaspPeacock launched on 19 September 1813 at New York Navy Yard and commissioned with Master Commandant Lewis Warrington in command soon after.  She broke through the British blockade of New York on 12 March 1814 with supplies for the naval station at St. Mary’s, Georgia and after making the delivery headed south, eventually arriving near Cape Canaveral, Florida on 29 April.

 

epervier vs peacock.jpg

HMS Epervier vs USS Peacock

29 April 1814

 

When Epervier saw Peacock, she changed course to the southwest directly towards her.  After Peacock, flying a British ensign and pennant, did not respond to Epervier’s signals, Wales signaled to his convoy that the unidentified sail was the enemy and the convoy set all sail heading northeast.  At about 9:40 am Peacock ran up several US flags and cleared for action.  In the two hours since both ships had sighted each other the wind had gradually veered from a little south of east to almost directly out of the south.

 

At 10 am, with Epervier close hauled on the port tack, Peacock, at half gun range with the wind over her starboard quarter, turned slightly to the north but Epervier kept her bowsprit pointed directly towards the bow of her enemy.  Epervier then turned into the wind, fired a raking broadside close off Peacock’s starboard bow and continued her turn.  Peacock fired her starboard battery at 10:20 during Epervier’s turn.  Both broadsides took effect aloft; Peacock suffered her only significant injury – a disabled foresail yard – during this exchange.

 

At 10:35, Epervier completed her turn on a course parallel to Peacock and fired an ineffectual broadside from her port battery.  Peacock immediately returned fire and continued with a bombardment from her starboard battery at Epervier’s hull.  Epervier’s main topmast fell by the side and then the mainsail boom fell to the deck smashing the wheel, rendering her unmanageable.  Epervier’s return fire had fallen to nothing by this time.

 

Anticipating that Peacock’s next move would be to come along side and board, Wales attempted to rally his crew to board her the moment the two vessels touched.  His crew refused.  Epervier struck her colors at 11:05 am.

 

Peacock suffered the one injury to the foresail yard, some damaged rigging and sails and two men slightly wounded.  Repairs were completed in less than 45 minutes.  Warrington pointed out that not one shot from Epervier had struck Peacock’s hull.  The prize master on Epervier, First Lieutenant John B. Nicolson, reported 9 dead or mortally wounded and 14 wounded, 45 shot holes in her hull and 5 feet of water in the hold, bowsprit severely damaged, most of the foremast stays and braces shot away, main topmast over the side, main gaff sail boom shot away and the mainmast shot through but still standing only because the sea was flat and the wind was light.  Jury repairs to Epervier were completed by sunset but only through great exertion to prevent her from sinking.  No doubt the discovery of $118,000 in Epervier’s lock room came as a great surprise.

 

The next day, the Americans sighted two British frigates.  Peacock successfully decoyed them away from Epervier and later escaped from their pursuit.  Epervier arrived in St. Mary’s, Georgia on 1 May; Peacock arrived on the 4th.

 

The victory of the Peacock over the Epervier was one of the most one-sided of the War of 1812, even though the two opposing vessels were not grossly disparate in strength.  It was stated that although Peacock's fire had dismounted some of Epervier's carronades, more of them fell from their mounts when they were fired.  Wales had carried out little or none of the gunnery practice that would have revealed defects in the guns or carriages before it was too late to remedy them.  Wales had also reported disaffection and unrest among his crew and, unusually for the Royal Navy in the War of 1812, they failed in their duty to fight to their utmost.  The court martial on 20 January 1815 revealed that Epervier had the worst crew of any vessel on her station.  In particular, her crew consisted mostly of invalids from the hospital.

 

After completion of repairs Epervier went into US Navy service with the same name and rate.  USS Epervier, under Master Commandant John Downes, sailed to join the Mediterranean Squadron under Commodore Stephen Decatur, Jr., whose mission was to stop the harassment of American shipping by the Dey of Algiers. Epervier joined with Guerriere, Constellation, Ontario and five smaller vessels in the Battle off Cape Gata on 17 June 1815, which led to the capture of the 44 (or 46)-gun frigate Meshuda (or Mashuda).  Epervier fired nine broadsides into Meshuda to induce her to surrender after Guerriere had already crippled the Algerian vessel.

 

Two days later the Epervier and three of the smaller vessels of the squadron captured the Algerian brig of war Estedio, of twenty-two guns and 180 men, at the Battle off Cape Palos.  After the conclusion of peace with Algiers, Decatur transferred Downes to Guerriere.

 

After the Dey signed a treaty, Decatur chose Epervier, under Lieutenant John T. Shubrick, Guerriere's former first lieutenant, to carry a copy of the treaty and some captured flags to the United States.  Captain Lewis and Lieutenants Neale and John Yarnall came on board as passengers.  Epervier sailed through the Straits of Gibraltar on 14 July 1815 and was never seen again.

 

Peacock went on two more cruises in the War of 1812 with Lewis Warrington still in command during which she captured eighteen merchant vessels.  After the war, she continued to serve almost continuously until 1841, when she ran aground and broke up on a bar of the Columbia River in Oregon as part of the United States Exploring Expedition.  Her crew and most of the scientific data were successfully taken off.  She had undergone a breakup and rebuild in 1828 which reduced her armament to 8 x long 24 pounders and 2 x long 9 pounders and increased her displacement to 650 tons specifically for exploratory and extended duration cruises while retaining her overall length and sail plan.1

 

After the war, Lewis Warrington received promotion to Captain in command of Macedonian, then Java, followed by Guerriere.  He also commanded the West India Station during the last stages of the piracy suppression campaign, which earned him the title of Commodore.  He also served as Commandant of the Norfolk Navy Yard, multiple times as a Commissioner of the Navy Board, Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, Secretary of the Navy (temporarily, between the death of the Secretary and appointment of a replacement) and finally, as Chief of the Bureau of Ordinance until his death in 1851 at age 69.  Three destroyers were named in his honor in the early and middle 20th Century.

 

Epervier might make an interesting variation of Caldercraft/Jotika’s Cruizer with the fore and aft platforms and the armament change.  She could also be built as she appeared in either the Royal Navy or the US Navy.  The US Navy had hull drawings made which were redrawn by Howard I. Chapelle for his book ​The History of the American Sailing Navy.  These drawings also show the changes made for US service: increased mast rake, lowered gun ports and a low rail on top of the bulwarks at the forecastle platform.1

 

 

Next:  HMS Reindeer

 

 

Edits:  1  additions to text

2  "carronades or gunnades" to "carronade boat guns", see post #33

 

Sources: 

The Naval History of Great Britain by William James, 1824

History of the Navy of the United States by J. Fenimore Cooper, 1836

The Naval War of 1812 by Theodore Roosevelt, 1900

The Age of Fighting Sail by C. S. Forester, 1957

Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, Dept US Navy, (online)


Edited by DFellingham, 28 May 2013 - 05:37 PM.

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Research Project:  Cruizer-class Brig-Sloops

 

 

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#22
Beef Wellington

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Great info Dave, very interesting.  I would agree that there is an opportunity for Caldercraft to offer such a kit that would make it easy to model any one of the Cruizer class - it seems the later Cruizers had the caronnades and often had the fore and aft platforms (paintings of HMS Pelorus illustrate this when she grounded, and interestingly she was ship rigged for a period as well which suggests that masting changes may have been pretty common).  Looking forward to the next installment.


Cheers,
 
Jason


"But if you ask the reason of this, many will be found who never thought about it"
 
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HMS Snake (c1797: Cruizer Class, ship rigged sloop)

HMS Jason (c1794: Artois Class 38 gun frigate)


#23
Dave Fellingham

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Thank you, Jason, for your interest, this has been a fascinating research project - to the detriment of my Esmeralda build.

 

HMS Cruizer's armament was changed to the class standard 16 x 32 pounder carronades + 2 x 6 pound chase guns sometime before the first of her sister ships, Scorpion, entered service (with the standard armament) in November 1803.

 

It also seems likely that the fore and aft raised platforms were the standard after Cruizer, although I have by no means researched all of them (perhaps 10%).

 

Like Pelorus in 1826, Fly and Grasshopper (the 2nd one, the first was captured to become the Dutch Irene) had their rig changed to ship-sloop in 1822 (according to plans at the NMM, Greenwich, website).  It may be of interest to know that the mast positions differed between Snake and Victor (according to the same set of plans).  Pelorus was converted back to a brig in 1831.

 

It's ironic that Pelorus had been engaged in suppression of the opium trade along the China coast in 1840-41, then sold out of the service in Singapore in 1842 to became an opium smuggler until she wrecked in 1844.  Curlew was also an opium runner as Jamesina after she sold out of service in 1822 until at least the mid 1830's.

 

By 1830, only twenty-five of the class (whatever the rig) remained in service. In 1840, ten remained. By 1850, only two were still in service, Pelican and Doterel. Doterel was broken up in 1855 as the last one in the Royal Navy.  As we already know, Pelican was transferred to the Coast Guard in 1850 and sold in 1865.

 

 

Edited for typo corrections.


Edited by DFellingham, 07 May 2013 - 05:58 PM.

esmeralda (3)sm.jpg

Current Builds:  ESMERALDA Chilean Navy School Ship, 1/640 in a bottle

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Completed Build:  Prairie Schooner OGALLALA 1/96 in a bottle

Research Project:  Cruizer-class Brig-Sloops

 

 

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Benjamin Franklin


#24
Beef Wellington

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You know, you may have a book in the works here ;)


Cheers,
 
Jason


"But if you ask the reason of this, many will be found who never thought about it"
 
In the shipyard:

HMS Snake (c1797: Cruizer Class, ship rigged sloop)

HMS Jason (c1794: Artois Class 38 gun frigate)


#25
Dave Fellingham

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:omg:  I hope I NEVER feel compelled to do that!

 

I find writing to be extremely laborious.  I'd much rather build ship models.


esmeralda (3)sm.jpg

Current Builds:  ESMERALDA Chilean Navy School Ship, 1/640 in a bottle

insanity Dan Clapp's hard water race boat in a bottle

Completed Build:  Prairie Schooner OGALLALA 1/96 in a bottle

Research Project:  Cruizer-class Brig-Sloops

 

 

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Benjamin Franklin


#26
AnobiumPunctatum

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Very interesting read.


Regards Christian
 

In the shipyard: HM Sloop Fly, 1776 - Scale 1/32;

On the drawing board: Naval Cutter Rattlesnake, 1777 - Scale 1/32


#27
Dave Fellingham

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Cruizers, part 6:  HMS Reindeer

 

The Cruizer-class brig-sloop HMS Reindeer launched on 15 August 1804, commissioned in September and set sail for the Jamaica station on 21 November with Commander John Fyffe in command. She was one of six Cruizers built from fir to speed construction and cut cost, a compromise that would significantly reduce their service lives. All six were started and launched within a period of three months from 22 May through 22 August.  Raven, the first Cruizer discussed here, was one of that group, wrecked in 1805. Another foundered in 1809. In 1812, two were broken up and a third placed in ordinary and later sold. By 1814, Reindeer was the only one of this group still in service and four years past her projected service life.

 

Under Commander Fyffe’s command on the Jamaica station from May 1804 through February 1807, Reindeer captured at least six enemy privateers and one sunk and participated with Magicienne in the cutting out expedition of a French merchant schooner from under a battery in Aguadilla Bay, Puerto Rico. Reindeer also engaged two French Navy brigs of 16 x 9 pounder guns, sailing together, in a running battle and chase of over four hours until they managed to escape after taking damage from Reindeer’s fire. They were captured two days later by HMS Pique and taken into Royal Navy service. Reindeer, in January, shared with three other Royal Navy men-of-war the proceeds from the capture of an unspecified number of merchant vessels.

 

Commander Peter John Douglas took command in February 1807. Reindeer captured six privateers, three merchant vessels and re-captured an English vessel held by a French prize crew. After a chance meeting of Reindeer and four other Royal Navy vessels on 10 November 1808, the captains decided to capture the town and port of Samana, a base for many French privateers, in support of Spanish patriots attempting to overthrow French rule over the western part of the island of Santo Domingo. After the capture of the town and port (and French vessels sheltered there), Captain Charles Dashwood of Franchise handed Samana over to a Spanish officer, Don Diego de Lira, who guaranteed the safety of the French inhabitants on their plantations. The combined operations of these five ships netted two French privateer schooners and five merchant vessels in the week following the capture of Samana.

 

Reindeer, with Commander Douglas still in command, was in the North Sea for most of 1809 where she captured the French fast dispatch vessel Mouche No.13 on 8 March. On 4 November 1809, Reindeer set sail for Jamaica with Commander Christopher Crackenthorp Askew in command.

 

Reindeer, Commander Nicholas Lechmere Pateshall in command since sometime in 1811 or early 1812, with Polyphemus (64), and Thalia (36) set sail from Jamaica on 20 May 1812 to escort a convoy of about 100 ships bound for The Downs. They also carried news of the declaration of war by the United States, ratified and signed on 18 June, learned on the journey from a passing merchant vessel. A hurricane likely scattered the British convoy but the escorts collected some of the ships and continued to the destination. [The records, as far as I am able to find, are not clear on this except for the departure of the convoy and the sighting near Portsmouth of two of the escorts with a smaller convoy. Polyphemus separated from the convoy soon after it rounded the western tip of Cuba.]

 

The American Commodore, John Rodgers, within an hour of learning on 21 June of the 18 June ratification of the declaration of war, had ordered his squadron to set sail from New York to find and intercept this same convoy. This squadron consisted of Rodger’s flagship President (44), United States (44), Congress (36), Hornet (18) and Argus (16). They did not find the convoy but the President did engage the HMS Belvidera (36) on 23 June for the first naval action of the war. Belvidera did enough damage with her stern chasers - combined with the catastrophic chase gun explosion on the President that caused damage to the foremast, yards, sails and rigging, killed 16 men and wounded Rogers and many crewmen - to slow the President and allow Belvidera’s escape.

 

Reindeer arrived at Plymouth on 1 August 1812 for a refit that lasted until 11 September. It is likely that her 16 x 32 pounder carronades where exchanged for 24 pounders due to her age and having been built from fir although the records I have consulted cannot confirm the exchange during this refit, only that she was armed with them on a later date. It is also possible that the 32s were needed elsewhere and the change had nothing to do with Reindeer‘s condition. [See also post #13, which I had forgotten about, regarding these guns being replaced after Manners threw several 32s overboard during a storm. I gladly defer to uss frolick's expertise on this point.] This would reduce the dead weight on deck by 7,500 pounds and improve her speed and other sailing characteristics.  Commander Daniel Ross took command and set sail on the June 12 to begin his duties based from Plymouth.

 

Ross’s successor on Reindeer, Commander William Manners, captured six privateers and merchant vessels in 1813 with the first one on 2 February. They included two American privateer schooners, a French privateer lugger of 14 guns, a French merchant brig and two recaptured British merchant vessels held by unspecified enemy prize crews. Four of these were captured while Reindeer was in company with another British warship. One recapture was made by the Cruiser-class Derwent with assistance from Reindeer on 13 December.

 

Reindeer continued operating out of Plymouth through June of 1814.

 

The new American sloop-of-war Wasp, sister to the previously mentioned Peacock, was commissioned in early 1814 with Master Commandant Johnstone Blakeley in command. She remained at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, until receiving orders to attack British shipping in the western approaches of the English Channel and set sail on 1 May 1814 with a hand picked crew of 173 officers, sailors and marines, passing unobserved through the blockading frigates.

 

USS Wasp’s Specifications

Length:  117 ft

Beam:  31 ft 6 inches

Tonnage:  509 (burthen)

Rig:  ship-rigged sloop

Armament:  20 x 32 pounder carronades + 2 x 12 pounder chase guns

Complement:  173

 

In June, the Wasp, repeating the spectacular successes by Argus of the previous year, captured five British merchant vessels, scuttled four and turned one over to the accumulated prisoners. At 4:15 am of 28 June, about 225 miles west of Plymouth, Wasp began the pursuit of two merchant vessels to the northwest but soon noticed a third bearing down on her from a little north of east. This was the Reindeer with orders to find and destroy the Wasp.

 

Wasp v Reindeer.jpg

Action Between USS Wasp and HMS Reindeer, 28 June 1814

By Edwin Hayes, 1819-1904, NMM Collection

 

Under an overcast sky with a wind from the northeast so light that it scarcely disturbed the unusually smooth surface of the sea, Manners on Reindeer and Blakeley on Wasp began a contest in seamanship over the weather-gage that continued for more than ten hours. By ten am, both ships were identified as enemy sloops with Reindeer maintaining the weather-gage. At about 1:15, with no weather advantage gained or lost, Wasp beat to quarters without shortening sail then at 2:00 fired a gun to windward. Peacock immediately responded in kind to accept the challenge.

 

The maneuvering continued until 3:17 with both vessels close-hauled on the larboard tack running parallel courses at less than 60 yards distance and Reindeer still holding a slight weather advantage off Wasp’s larboard quarter. Reindeer fired the only gun on either sloop that would bear – her 12 pounder carronade boat gun mounted on the topgallant forecastle loaded with round shot and grape. Two minutes later Manners fired again, and again, five times.

 

Seeing that Reindeer was very slowly pulling even with Wasp, Blakely turned to the wind at 3:26 and hauled up his mainsail while firing a rolling broadside from aft forward as each gun bore during the turn. Peacock then turned to as well to bring her starboard battery to bear and fired at a distance of less than twenty yards from Wasp. Both crews, working the guns with desperate energy, exchanged broadside for broadside for ten minutes until Manners realized his only chance for victory lay in boarding and let Reindeer’s head fall off towards her opponent.

 

The sloops ground together at 3:40, men hacked and thrust at each other through the open gun ports while dense smoke from the fire of the guns that still bore billowed up from between the hulls. Cheered on by the mortally wounded Manners, grimly determined British sailors appeared through the smoke onto the deck of Wasp met by the deadly musket fire from her marines in the tops and the cutlasses and pikes of her sailors on deck. Bleeding profusely from a grape shot wound through both thighs and with several other less serious wounds, Reindeer’s captain sprang sword in hand to the foremast shrouds to lead personally his willing crew back onto Wasp saying, “Follow me, my boys, we must board them.” At that moment, a musket ball smashed through his skull and he fell back dead onto Reindeer’s deck, his sword still clenched in his right hand. As Manners fell and his men recoiled at the sight, Blakeley seized the moment to order his men forward onto Reindeer. After a moment’s furious struggle, Wasp’s boarders slew or drove below the remaining defenders. The captain’s clerk, the senior officer alive on deck, surrendered the brig at 3:44, 27 minutes after Reindeer had fired the first gun and 18 after Wasp had responded.

 

Wasp v reindeer - boarding.jpg

Marines Aboard USS Wasp Engage HMS Reindeer

By Sergeant John Clymer, USMC, 1945, Collection of the National Museum of the Marine Corp

Depicting the moment of Commander Manners’ fall, at far left

 

Reindeer was cut to pieces in line with her ports, and her upper works, boats and spare spars were reduced to splinters. Both masts were badly wounded just above the deck with the foremast tottering. Including her courageous commander and both midshipmen, she had 33 dead or dying and 34 wounded out of her crew of 98 men and 20 boys. The sails and rigging of Wasp were well cut up. Six round shot and many grape were embedded in her hull and many more had penetrated her sides or entered through her gun ports. One 24 pound shot had passed through the center of her foremast. Out of her complement of 173 men, she had 11 dead or dying and 15 wounded.

 

In a comparison between Reindeer and Wasp of the weight of broadsides and the size of the crews, the disparity for each is very close to 2 to 3, the greatest of any of the actions between Cruizer-class brig-sloops and the nominally “equal” American sloops. The outcome was proportional to the difference in force. Roosevelt quoted Cooper, “It is difficult to say which vessel behaved the best in this short but gallant combat.” Roosevelt went on to say, “I doubt if the war produced two better single-ship commanders than Captain Blakeley and Captain Manners; and an equal meed [measure] of praise attaches to both crews.” Even James refrained from his usual defamatory, anti-American remarks, “The action of the Reindeer and Wasp may be pronounced one of the best-fought sloop actions of the war,” although he did resort to his characteristic distortion of the numbers.

 

After Reindeer’s surrender, Master Commandant Johnstone Blakeley and both crews set to work caring for the wounded, burying the dead and making repairs through the night and into the next day, 29 June. When the wind increased during the day, Reindeer’s foremast fell and the decision made to burn her rather than risk her re-capture. After the wounded were transferred to Wasp and a passing neutral vessel, and Reindeer’s 12 pound boat gun brought on board, Reindeer was fired. Wasp stood off to watch her burn and then set a course for L’Orient after her magazine exploded.

 

Three Royal Navy vessels and three US Navy vessels have borne the name “Reindeer” in her honor.

 

As an alternative subject for Caldercraft’s Cruizer, Reindeer would need a change in the armament to 24 pounder carronades (which are available), the addition of the 12 pounder carronade mounted on a gun carriage and the addition of the fore and aft platforms like those on Snake. Because of my research into these Cruizer class brigs, I am becoming convinced that the platforms may have been typical, but more research is needed to confirm this. In the six that I have researched for these articles the platforms were mentioned specifically or their existence implied in the sources.

 

 

Next:  HMS Avon

 

Sources: 

The Naval History of Great Britain by William James, 1824

History of the Navy of the United States by J. Fenimore Cooper, 1836

The Naval War of 1812 by Theodore Roosevelt, 1900

The Age of Fighting Sail by C. S. Forester, 1957

Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, Dept US Navy, (online)

 “NMM, vessel ID 374389”, Warship Histories, vol.iii, National Maritime Museum (online)

“HMS Reindeer (1804)”, “USS Wasp (1814)”, “Sinking of HMS Reindeer”, articles on Wikipedia (online)

The London Gazette, 16 citations listed in “HMS Reindeer (1804)”, Wikipedia

 

[Edited to include information from post #13 I had forgotten to include, also typo corrections]


Edited by DFellingham, 27 May 2013 - 09:30 PM.

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esmeralda (3)sm.jpg

Current Builds:  ESMERALDA Chilean Navy School Ship, 1/640 in a bottle

insanity Dan Clapp's hard water race boat in a bottle

Completed Build:  Prairie Schooner OGALLALA 1/96 in a bottle

Research Project:  Cruizer-class Brig-Sloops

 

 

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Benjamin Franklin


#28
mtaylor

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Thanks for another fascinating read, Dave.  


Mark

"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me


Current Build:

Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0

Past Builds:
Triton Cross-Section
USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War (Gallery) Build Log
Wasa (Gallery)


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#29
realworkingsailor

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Agreed, very interesting stories surrounding this class of ships. Thoroughly fascinating reading

Andy

Quando Omni Flunkus, Moritati


Current Builds:

HMS Pegasus (On Hold)
SS Stadacona CSL Self Unloading Bulk Carrier (On Hold)

HMS Diana

 

Next Builds:

USF Confederacy
HM Snow Ontario (somehow)
 


#30
st george

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Great thread Dave and a joy to read.

 

Cheers mate

 

David


David

 

Current Build : HMAV Bounty - Amati

 

Next Build : 18th Century Longboat


#31
Dave Fellingham

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Thank you, Mark, Andy and Dave, for your kind comments. They make the effort to collect and organize the information and then write it up worth while. I'm very pleased that you enjoy my feeble efforts.

 

I went through my previous articles to correct and add information that I learned since I posted them, including those posted on this thread. Thank you to all who posted corrections and additional information.

 

Dave


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insanity Dan Clapp's hard water race boat in a bottle

Completed Build:  Prairie Schooner OGALLALA 1/96 in a bottle

Research Project:  Cruizer-class Brig-Sloops

 

 

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Benjamin Franklin


#32
trippwj

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Dave -

 

Let me add my thanks as well.  These are fantastic narratives and have saved them for future reference.

 

WELL DONE!


Wayne

Neither should a ship rely on one small anchor, nor should life rest on a single hope.
Epictetus


#33
Dave Fellingham

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Thank you, Wayne, very much!

 

You might want to go back to my earlier articles from time to time to see what has been added.

 

This project has grown from a simple internet search for basic information into something more. I've learned a lot from it, not just about the ships and people, but also, more importantly, where and how to look for that information. For example, in an article, "The Carronade," by Spencer C. Tucker in The Nautical Research Journal, Mar. 1997, Vol.42,  No. 1, I just today found a drawing of a boat gun like the 12 pounder used on the Cruizers in the War of 1812. This article is well referenced to other sources of more information.

 

boat gun.jpg

Boat gun set for firing at tops, The use of a quoin would allow horizontal fire.

 

As a result, I've come to the conclusion that the 2 x 18 pounders in the forward gun ports on Epervier were not carronades or gunnades (which were a carronade with a different method of mounting the barrel to the slide not used until about 1820), but were much more likely boat guns. They would be a better fit in the restricted space at the forward ports than any carronade. Of course this conjecture needs verification, but good enough for most models except in a museum.

 

Dave

 

 


esmeralda (3)sm.jpg

Current Builds:  ESMERALDA Chilean Navy School Ship, 1/640 in a bottle

insanity Dan Clapp's hard water race boat in a bottle

Completed Build:  Prairie Schooner OGALLALA 1/96 in a bottle

Research Project:  Cruizer-class Brig-Sloops

 

 

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Benjamin Franklin


#34
michaelpsutton2

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The National Maritime Museum at Greenwich has any number of draughts related to the Cruizer class and as you say with a little researchone could reproduce almost any one of them.  But to the best of my knowledge there is no definitive set of spar dimensions or sail plan that is positively identified as belonging to a Cruizer class vessal either brig or ship rigged. There are a number of sail plans listed as being "generally suitable for the smaller classes of ships". They would apply equally to Cruizer, Cherokee or other classes.

 

Does anyone know of a document that lists masts and yards or a drawing?

 

It is of course possible, even easy to calculate the spar dimensions from Steel's The Elements and Practice of Rigging And Seamanship, or Edyes Elements of Rigging & Seamanship, or even Lee's Masting & Rigging English Ships of War.

 

It would be great though, to have a set of numbers that was actually put into service to confirm one's approximations.


Edited by michaelpsutton2, 30 May 2013 - 01:58 PM.

Drown you may, but go you must and your reward shall be a man's pay or a hero's grave


#35
druxey

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One possible set of spar and sail dimensions can be found in Petrejus' book on the Irene, a ex Cruiser class vessel. The English language edition is sought after, therefore quite hard to find and expensive.

 

The illustration of the gun in high elevation has a slightly misleading caption. Not only was the quoin removed in this instance, but also the bed beneath the quoin. Removing only the quoin would elevate the gun perhaps about 10 degrees.



#36
Dave Fellingham

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Howard I. Chapelle's The History of the American Sailing Navy has a hull plan compiled from the NMM drawings and a drawing of Epervier made by William Rule and Henry Peake during her preparation for US service. Chapelle's drawing shows before and after configurations but no spar dimensions. It seems reasonable to me that sail plans or spar take-offs would not be made unless there were significant differences from standard practice such as was done of the topsail schooners built in the Chesapeake Bay area. The practice of the period was to list spar dimensions in the construction contract documents but I haven't done a search for them at NMM.

 

My plan is to work with the Caldercraft Cruizer kit which I assume has spars based on their research or on standard practice. I agree that confirmation would be great.


esmeralda (3)sm.jpg

Current Builds:  ESMERALDA Chilean Navy School Ship, 1/640 in a bottle

insanity Dan Clapp's hard water race boat in a bottle

Completed Build:  Prairie Schooner OGALLALA 1/96 in a bottle

Research Project:  Cruizer-class Brig-Sloops

 

 

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Benjamin Franklin


#37
michaelpsutton2

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In Petrejus' book on the Irene there is some information on her spars in the Dutch service as well as a comparison with the general purpose sail plans for brigs at the NMM. And there are differences to be seen.

 

You might look at the sail plan http://collections.r...ects/84439.html

 

The caption says it is from the 20th century.

 

Diagramatic sail plans are rather uncommon but I would hope for a written list of spar lengths. Is it unreasonable to believe that with so many vessals in the class that at least one such list would make it's way down to us?

 

Some may think that I am splitting hairs here. I am primarily a painter not a model maker. Subtle difference in the spar dimensions can make major differences in the look of my paintings. You model guys get all particular about deck plans which make a huge difference in models and none at all the paintings.

 

In the end though I think all of us hate, absolutley hate to go through a project that takes months and then find some previously undiscovered piece of significant information that contradicts what he have done.

 

I guess models can be corrected, my paintings cannot


Edited by michaelpsutton2, 30 May 2013 - 08:41 PM.

Drown you may, but go you must and your reward shall be a man's pay or a hero's grave


#38
druxey

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No overpainting or pentimenti allowed, Michael?



#39
michaelpsutton2

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It is singularly unforgiving.

 

It is the moment just before the pen touches the pen touches the board for the first time that is so addictive. At that moment I just know this painting is going to be perfect. Once I begin, each brush stroke is a kind of compromise. And in the end my own limitations force me to have to continue the quest for the ultimate work from the beginning all over again.  

 

Last night I began an illustration of HMS Rose 1757 based on the original draughts not on the replica now in existance and iI told myself as I sat in front of that prisine white canvas that just maybe,  God willing and a fair wind, this will be the one.


  • granta likes this

Drown you may, but go you must and your reward shall be a man's pay or a hero's grave


#40
Dave Fellingham

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Once I begin, each brush stroke is a kind of compromise. And in the end my own limitations force me to have to continue the quest for the ultimate work from the beginning all over again.  

 

 

Sounds familiar, just a different medium. As soon as that first piece of wood is cut a compromise has been made because the wood itself isn't to scale. 


  • mtaylor likes this

esmeralda (3)sm.jpg

Current Builds:  ESMERALDA Chilean Navy School Ship, 1/640 in a bottle

insanity Dan Clapp's hard water race boat in a bottle

Completed Build:  Prairie Schooner OGALLALA 1/96 in a bottle

Research Project:  Cruizer-class Brig-Sloops

 

 

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Benjamin Franklin





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