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Ever Got Calluses or Split Skin From Planking?


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I've upped the "production" of laying planks on my first model.  A whole 7 rows/day, two days in a row. :rolleyes:

 

My fingertips have developed calluses and there's split skin on my thumb.  When I'm laying planks, all I am concentrating on is getting the row I'm laying to butt up tight to the previously laid row, and to clean up the glue squeeze out.  I don't think of or see anything else.  The calluses aren't unexpected but the split on my thumb is. 

 

Is this typical or am I taking this plank laying too seriously?

Edited by Julie Mo
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You may not be overdoing anything, some woods will dry skin and some people are more sensitive than others. Happens often around here. When working some things and dry weather will dry the skin, those splits on the skin at the edges of the fingers and thumb nails are painful, as are the rare splits down the center. Bag Balm is what I have used for years, it will prevent drying out, sooth and help heal splits. Kind of messy stuff in large amounts so a little goes a long way. For bad splits I place a small gob on the split and cover it with a band aid, by morning the pain is gone and healing is well on it's way. Bag Balm was designed for milk cow tits, when they are chapped, prevents getting kicked, when I was a kid milking the cow, it was in the barn and I used it when needed, usually in the winter. Those who were using it before me noticed it was good for dry and split fingers, so it found its way into the house as an accepted treatment. My step mother also used it on small wounds on her horse, helped heal and kept flies from bothering the wound, unlike some treatments, the horse didn't mind. Today you can buy it in drug stores, at least around here, in small tins. Shelf life seems to be forever.

jud

Edited by jud
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When I was laying the last plank row of the day, I paid attention to what I was doing to cause the thumb split.  It happens while cleaning up the glue squeeze out.  For those of you who haven't seen my build log, I filled in between the frames with balsa.  So I am laying glue on the entire length and having to clean the squeeze out on the entire length.

 

I will have to learn a better method.  And if I forget, my thumb will remind me. ;)

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You might try a little less glue. Wood glue is surprisingly strong and if you apply a little and spread it evenly over the plank before applying so that it is a thin coating instead of a thick line or blob it will adhere just a strong without the squeeze out. A damp cloth will also wipe up any glue that does come out without soaking the wood or getting on your fingers. If all else fails a pair of latex gloves might help prevent your skin from cracking.

 

I am of that group of modelers who tend to glue their fingers to things then rip off the glue removing skin in the process. I am fairly certain that all my ships have parts of me on them. Blood from a cut finger or glued skin, I leave my mark on them as they leave theirs on me. :P

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I may need to apply glue to a few hundred more feet of planking before I can lay down that perfect bead every time.  Sometimes I get it perfect, other times it's a bit too heavy.  I am of the school that believes glue needs to applied to 100% of the wood surface, so I never lay it down on the light side.  That may be the correct attitude for furniture and instrument making, but not quite necessary for planking.  I'm also using a quart bottle with a spout designed for much larger projects.  I suppose I could find a smaller bottle for glue application.

 

The other side of the coin is if glue is laid down too sparingly, before I even get to the end of the plank, it has dried.  The plank wood soaks up the PVA glue like a sponge.  I had to switch from Titebond I to Titebond II so I could get a slower drying time.  Maybe Titebond III is in order.

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Julie Mo, the Titebond III is pretty watery as it comes out of the bottle. It is a water-proof glue, meant for outdoor use. I pour a bit on a plastic sheet and then daub it onto the boards. Like Druxey says, clean up with water and a paintbrush. I'm in the midst of building a 1/24 scale grist mill, complete with a water wheel, for my railroad club's garden railroad.

 

How long are the planks you're gluing up?

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The planks are 25.5".  The hull is about 45" LOA.

 

The last row I laid I took a bit more time laying the glue bead but I really need a smaller spout.  I was just reminded I have bottles with smaller spouts I can use instead of the quart Titebond bottle.  Still haven't set up the shop completely after the move so I tend to forget what I have.

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If you are forcing the planks then they aren't the correct shape.  Try sanding a little off in the areas you are forcing to get a neater fit.

Planking should lay flat without having to force the plank down.  If it is a curvature problem then you need to bend the plank before trying to place it.

Reading the planking tutorials here will help with all those issues.  As far as bending the planks, search "plank bending" in the forums fr some tip.

Good luck

Tom

 

By the way a couple photos of the offending areas might help generate some solutions too.

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