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Dado blade for Dremel table saw- Good bad or crazy idea


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Hi Guys,

 

Before I invested in a high quality carbide stacked dado blade set for my big saw, I had this gadget which you would place on the arbor, which, when rotated, would create a variable degree of blade wobble to cut dados. I was thinking that if I got a 3/16" thick washer and filed it down so it would be 3/16th on one edge and 1/16 on the other, I could get a dado cut of 1/8th" plus the blade kerf on my Dremel table saw.

 

I need some input here. Is this a good, bad, or crazy idea? Thanks.

 

Best,

John

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You may accomplish what you want by milling two matching and indexed washers. You want the washers to both be in alignment so when you tighten the washers with blade between them there is uniform contact with the canted blade, without that you will have a distorted blade under uneven pressure, that pressure will relieve itself at its own choosing, not yours. Double indexed washers could be made to work, but there are better and safer ways.

jud

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A rabbet in the keel is about the only place I can see this sort of cut being used AND  a rabbet varies in slope and angle as the garboard changes conformation, it would not be appropriate here.  For notches in beams and clamps, a milling cutter would offer more control and be much safer.

A table saw is my idea of the most dangerous tool we use - a last resort choice.

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John,

 

Anything is possible.  Not sure if this is a good idea though.  I haven't worked with a wobble saw, but unless there's some special grinding of the top of the teeth it won't produce a flat bottom on the dado.  The smaller the diameter of the saw relative to the kerf, the more pronounced the rounding will be.  (To produce a flat bottom, the saw kerf would have to be zero.)

 

Secondly, does the motor on the Dremel saw have enough torque to plow a dado?

 

On your math, a 1/8" wedge in say a 1" diameter washer and a 4" diameter saw will produce an approximately 1/2" + kerf wide dado.

 

Not sure why you want to make dados on the Dremel.  Not much need for wide dados in model ship building.  If you're making grating, then generally you have to use jeweler's saws anyway.   If you want to do dados for cabinet work, but don't want to spend the money on a stacked set, then just do multiple kerf cuts.  I do this on my 10" Delta when I don't want to take the time to set up a dado blade.

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Bruce,

 

I've equipped the Dremel saw with a cogged belt and it has plenty of torque. In my experience there are lots of times where you want to nibble away at a cross cut and being able to take a "bigger bite" would be advantageous. To me, the issue Jud raises makes the most sense. I will take Mark's advise and check out what MM offers.

 

John

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There is one thing about 'wobble' blades -- they produce a square bottom at only one width.  At other width it will be concave or convex.

 

Perhaps you might mount two blades on the arbor, with spacer washers in between.  Chisel out the waste in between, or mill it out with a single blade in the saw.  If the saw is underpowered, go easy with several cuts.  

 

There is also a gadget called a Kerfmaker by Bridge City Toolworks -- there are vids about homemade ones.  Also, look at the 'Jointmaker Pro' saw.   The tools are exquisite, and the prices heavenly.

 

https://www. bridgecitytools.com

Edited by Bob Blarney
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