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cap'n mike

La Couronne parts

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Hello to all, I am just waiting for Santa to deliver my Corel La Couronne kit shortly. In doing some preliminary research I came across Lee Martin's project on NRG and he mentioned some modifications. Not knowing some of the part terminology I was hoping for some pictorial example for the following:

What are catharpins?

What are jeers to the main yards?

What are bowlines to each yard?

What are mizzen topmast stays, fore topmast stays and spritsail topmast backstays?

And what do each of these look like? Can anyone point me in the right direction for documentation etc.

Thanks

 

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I'd say get ahold of Wolfram zu Mondfelds book on terminology.Its called Historic ship models and published by Sterling. 350 pages of pictures,diagrams and contents.

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On ‎12‎/‎14‎/‎2019 at 9:52 AM, cap'n mike said:

Hello to all, I am just waiting for Santa to deliver my Corel La Couronne kit shortly. In doing some preliminary research I came across Lee Martin's project on NRG and he mentioned some modifications. Not knowing some of the part terminology I was hoping for some pictorial example for the following:

What are catharpins?

What are jeers to the main yards?

What are bowlines to each yard?

What are mizzen topmast stays, fore topmast stays and spritsail topmast backstays?

And what do each of these look like? Can anyone point me in the right direction for documentation etc.

Thanks

Hi Mike,

Like you, I have to learn the names of all the basic lines on a galleon for both standing rigging and running rigging.  For help in understanding, you will need a copy of The Rigging of Ships: in the Days of the Spritsail Topmast, 1600-1720 by R.C. Anderson.  You will have to pick out the bits of information that apply to "foreign" (non-English) vessels from the early 17th century and apply them to La Couronne.  Gaps in the information you will have to fill in from other sources, but if you see options, choose Dutch style features since La Couronne was primarily Dutch in design.

 

1) Catharpins are a web of lines and blocks between the shrouds, locate under the tops on the mainmast and foremast.  They prevent the shrouds from being pulled in an outboard direction by the futtuckshrouds.  La Couronne probably did not have these lines.

2) Jeers are sets of blocks and tackles that hoist the yardarms and hold them up.  The lines that support the yardarms are called ties.  In old ships, the blocks and tackles that pull the ties and hoise the yard arms up are located near the deck.  In later ships, they are located up high, just under the tops, and these are called jeers.  The arrangement of the ties for the yardarms are of the older style, so La Couronne does not have jeers.

3) the bowlines are lines attached to the our edges (leech) of a sqaure sail.  They extend toward the bow and are used to pull the edge of the sail forward to assist turning the sail when changing the angle of the yardarms, when tacking for example.  These will be on La Couronne.  Typically they start at the leech of the sail and extend down and forward, passing through a hole in the bulwark for the main course sail. 

4) On the mizzenmast, the second section of the mast up from the deck is called the mizzen topmast.  Stays are classified as standing rigging.  That is, they are lines that support the masts as opposed to runing rigging, which are lines that are used to operate the yards and sails.  A mizzen topmast stay run from the top of the mizzen topmast in the forward direction, and ends in a variety of places depending on the ship.  On La Couronne, this line has a block at the end, and the line that goes through this block is tied off in two locations, one at a block and tackle near the deck right in front of the mizzenmast, and the other ends in a complex crows foot of expanding line segments and blocks tied to the rearmost shroud for the main mast.  It's easier to draw picture than to explain.  Refer to photos of EJ-L's La Couronne model.

5) Topmast stays are stays that support the top end of any topmast section in the forward direction, whether it be on the fore, main, or mizzen masts. 

6) A Backstay is a stay that extends from a mast and travels in the rear directions, offering support to the mast from the rear.  At the end of the bowsprit on La Couronne is a small mast called the sprit topmast.  This mast holds the sprit topsail which is used for assitsing in turning the ship.  The backstay for that mast goes from the top of that mast down and rearward, offering support from the rear.  Refer to rigging pictures for what it is tied to.

 

Hope that helps.  Learn your basic rigging terms for each part of the ship before assembling it and you will be talking like a sailor in no time. 

 

Buy this: The Rigging of Ships: in the Days of the Spritsail Topmast

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Thank you Darivs,

I really appreciate your sharing this info. Having started assembling some of the ship I am having a bit of a problem with the parts list. It is only in Italian and Corel does not have an English translation. Do you know if there is one in existence? I have tried using Google Translate but some of the words don't make sense.

Mike Gallant

 

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1 hour ago, cap'n mike said:

Thank you Darivs,

I really appreciate your sharing this info. Having started assembling some of the ship I am having a bit of a problem with the parts list. It is only in Italian and Corel does not have an English translation. Do you know if there is one in existence? I have tried using Google Translate but some of the words don't make sense.

Mike Gallant

 

I have not seen an Italian translation of the Corel lists.  My kit had English instructions for the instruction steps, though.  What is the nature of the parts list problem?  The parts are shown on the drawings and schematics.  Use the numbers and identify the types of wood in Italian and make a list of them in English.  I mentioned previously that ANY translation would not match the terminology we use in English.  In order to learn the names of the parts of the ship, you need a book like the one I linked above.  Without it, you will find it extremely difficult to understand instructions, even in English.  I don't think I could have built this kit WITHOUT the reading the book once through, then constantly referencing it to check if the Corel instructions are correct for a 1630's ship.  The book combined with the schematics ARE the instructions.  The parts list only tells you what size and type of wood to use.  Also, there are ALWAYS errors in the instructions.  Example: Look at the belaying pins located on the rails on either side of the bridge deck.  Notice that the locations of the pins in the top view to NOT match the precise locations in the side view?  And if you think the Corel instructions are poor, there are kits out there that are a LOT worse.  The model companies ASSUME that you have experience building wooden ship models and know some things about rigging.  It's tough to start fresh with one of these.  I know.  La Couronne is my FIRST wooden model ship.

 

Bottom line (no pun intended): you NEED to know the names and functions of the rigging and structural features of a ship like this in order to build it.  THERE ARE NO SHORTCUTS TO READING AND RESEARCH.  It's actually a MAJOR part of the experience of building the model.  80% of building this ship is planning, reading and learning the features.  Only 20% is actually cutting, shaping, fitting and painting.  That's why these things take years to complete properly.

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In the kit area is a pinned post with lists of build logs.   I went ahead pulled down the current log (it does get updated) and there's 4 builds either finished or in work.   Have look at them as it's a good way to feel for the model and what's involved.

 

Wooden Ships.pdf

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