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In looking at contemporary model photos, a question came to mind for me.  As a rule, were the hawse holes cut so to be parallel with the keel, or at a specific angle (90 degrees??) to the face of the hawse pieces and boxing?  The following is a photo of the bow of the 1715 model of a fifty gun ship that is framed port with square frames and starboard with cant frames.  In each case, the hawse holes are clearly not parallel to the keel but was this the norm?    Allan

444156506_framedfiftybow.thumb.jpg.90dac466a057ec1ea9dc733f2131860a.jpg     

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My understanding is that they were usually parallel to the keel and angled upward and in at about 10 degrees or so. This would apply to hawse pieces that are erected parallel to the keel, the usual arrangement. In the photo above, the model's hawse pieces on both sides (which are framed differently) are canted, which would explain the holes running at the same angles as the hawse pieces.

Be sure to sign up for an epic Nelson/Trafalgar project if you would like to see it made into a TV series  http://trafalgar.tv

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Why would there be two different methods of framing? I never noticed that before... but then I am not that experienced.

Thanks

R

Richard
Member: The Nautical Research Guild
                Atlanta Model Shipwrights

Current build: Syren

                       

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Thanks Druxey,

 

Richard,  The model was built circa 1715, shortly after cant framing came into use.  The model was built to show the differences as far as anyone knows.   Anderson gives some good detail on the model in his book Navy Board Ship Models and RMG has photos and some information in there "Collections" which follows:

 

Scale: 1:48. A contemporary full hull model of a 50-gun small two-decker (circa 1715), built entirely in frame. It has been built to show the old style of construction against the new, especially around the area of the bow and stern. The wales are solid or ‘closed’ on starboard side and ‘open’ in two strips on port side. Although the framing configuration differs markedly on port and starboard sides, it has the dimensions as laid down for the 50 gun ships of the 1706 Establishment, but the closed or solid wales would suggest a later date of 1717. An important feature of this model is that it shows the hull framed up as built as opposed to the more stylized Navy Board hull framing.

Allan

PLEASE take 30 SECONDS and sign up for the epic Nelson/Trafalgar project if you would like to see it made into a TV series.   Click on http://trafalgar.tv   There is no cost other than the 30 seconds of your time.  THANK YOU

 

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outstanding model I do like the comparison from side to side.

 

Thanks fo the info on the hawse holes

Michael

Shipwrights of Central Ohio

 

Current Build: ...

Completed Builds: Queen Anne Barge - SyrenPinnace - MSHalifax 1768 - LSSMurrelet - PygmySwift 1805 - AL 

Future Builds: Surly (because i'm definitely not so Cheerful), Echo cross-section.....

 

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