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making moldings for ship models


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About a month ago, in a build log, one of us displayed some rather intricate molding detail on his model. Another one of us questioned how he was able to create such detail and, in response, the modeller produced a short vidio clip of his scraping technique.

 

Does anyone remember who it was that created those moldings, or how to contact him?

 

Tom

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Mark & others,

 

Thanks for your suggestions, but the information was on this site. Forgive me, but I'm a tight-fisted yankee and reluctant to pay good money to someone who may or may not have a productive suggestion for me. I used to be able to get all the information and help I needed right here for free because the membership here is very generous and entirely knowledgeable. I'm hoping that the membership will come together and rebuild this wonderful site.

 

TB

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It could also be because that link was put up with out the owner permission and that is a copyright issue, if that is the case I doubt you will see it again on here. Chuck if very much against that sort of thing. If it was on the site that Mark and I said we think it could be on, you might have to put your hand in your pocket this time.

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I did my best, but I'm not yet able to figure out how to get a more intricate shape to the molding than a basic double bead. The photo of the blade shows a cut that is 3/32" wide and the result is along the cabin top in the other photo.

post-106-0-93314900-1361245338_thumb.jpg

post-106-0-03567500-1361245353.jpg

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Dave,

It was, in fact, Alex's build log where I saw the technique first. And Mark has included a link to Colin's post in the "wooden tips and tricks" section. Both gentlemen use the same technique and are obviously quite adept at using a dremel in tight spaces. And that's the key; that and making sure the slot in the razor blade is the exact width of the scraped plank. The scraping part is actually duck soup. Dave and Mark, thanks for the "heads up".

 

Tom

Edited by TBlack
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  • 2 weeks later...

Man, I would never consider grinding a razor blade by hand as Zeptrader shows in one of his pictures.!!! I can just see something going wrong and the person doing it this way receives a sliver of razor blade in the face. Just think how close your eyes will be to the razor's edge!!!

 

I am well aware that this technique of grinding blades to make scrapers is neat and I have used that. But I would also recommend that the grinding tool be fixed in a lathe or drill-press and that the blade be in a vise of some sort. Wear safety glasses.

Edited by Modeler12
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I found that moving the blade towards the disk mounted in the lathe gave me better control of the cuts

I agree Greg. If you have a lathe that is the safest way to grind a razor blade.

 

I mounted the razor blade in the tool rest on top of a new tool bit. Run the cutting disk at pretty high speed and slowly advance the blade into it.

 

Sorry the picture is a bit out of focus, but I think you get the idea.

post-246-0-70946900-1362670663.jpg

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You see what I mean? The lathe idea is a great one and didn't cost me anything! Damn, this is a good place to be! I'll try that.

 

Also, Brian was asking about pre-made moldings. In the US, actually not far from my house, we have Northeast Scale Models (www.nesm.com); take a look.

 

Tom

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Tom, let me add one more comment about the scraping.

 

It is not as easy as it sounds and takes a bit of practice. It is difficult to keep a straight line by hand. Even the picture below shows a wiggly groove. I did use a fixture to guide the razor blade along. It is simply a piece of 1/4 inch thick aluminum stock clamped to a flat surface. I then also clamp the work piece parallel to the bar and let the edge of the razor blade ride against the bar. Again it takes a few tries to get it right.

post-246-0-75087700-1362682298.jpg

 

Also, keep in mind that the groove in the razor blade is what is left behind and it is the bottom edge that obviously does the digging. That does make it a bit more difficult to make rounded corners.

 

Here is one more example of how I scrape and the 'rounded' blade to give some interesting contours. The exact shape is hard to control, but the experiments are fun.
PS I held the blade the wrong way for this picture. I also would recommend several passes to get a 'clean' cut.

post-246-0-22767900-1362718081.jpg   post-246-0-07729900-1362718096.jpg

Edited by Modeler12
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Ok two more things and then I'll be quiet.

 

The same shape on the razor blade can give you different types of molding. The two pieces below were made by shifting the guide bar over a fraction of an inch. These were as scraped, not after I touched them up with some 400 grit paper and a sharp edge. These samples are from some basswood. Other woods might give you a sharper outline.

post-246-0-65936000-1362697992.jpg

 

Furthermore, you don't have to limit the grinding to the Dremmel type cut-off wheel. You might have others that can give you the curved cuts you want. Experiment!

post-246-0-03376400-1362698004.jpg

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Jay,

 

Thanks for the additional information. I can see where with a more complicated molding the aluminum bar as guide would be necessary. What I did with my simple double bead was to file a slot the width and depth of the molding piece into the edge of the razor and at the bottom of that slot put in the two half-rounds. The blade then fits over the wooden strip and is prevented from moving sideways.

 

BTW, great website; looks like you have a lot of fun!

 

Tom

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That is a neat idea Tom. I like it and next time I make molding, I will keep that in mind.

 

Thanks for your comment about our web site. It has been going for several years and started as a way for the two of us to share ideas, travel pictures, etc with our friends and relatives. I found it was a great way to 'communicate' and, yes, I have fun creating new additions, such as my 'build log'.

To me it is amazing how many people have done the various 'Walking Tours' in Europe, and I still get emails from people about the ones that are listed on our first page. The only people who don't like them are the tourist guides in those cities B) .

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