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HMB Endeavour by shipaholic - Eaglemoss - 1/51 - Bashed partwork

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Hi Steve, in this instance I think the AOTS may be correct (WRT topgallant shrouds).  According to Lees (page 61 under the topic of Topgallant and Royal masts - Shrouds) the practice of leading the tail end of the shroud down to the top to be secured to the eye or an eyebolt did not come into vouge until the early 19th century.

 

I am still trying to determine how the Main stay was secured - collar around the bowsprit or eyebolt.  I have experimented with both and have temporarily used an eyebolt but in a slightly different position.  I am leaning towards the collar also but intend to do a search of the NMM models contemporary to that era and see what is done.  Get back to you when I have completed that.

 

I am currently trying to determine whether the leading topgallant mast shroud leg was served similar to lower mast shrouds - any ideas?

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Hi Pat

Yes you are correct, I just read the section in Lees, the top gallant futtock shrouds were seized to the futtock stave. It also says that dead eyes were not used after 1719. That was my main problem with the AOTS - I don't think thimbles and lashing on the top gallant shrouds is correct

 

Cheers

Steve

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I am getting confused now. I will stick with AOTS. I am still trying to find out about the leading top gallant stay as to wether it was served.

I have posted some new pics as to where I am at.

Edited by mikec

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Hi Mike

I can't find in any of the books I have that describes the fore top gallant shroud being served. They probably were for the same reason as the topmost and lower shrouds shrouds were - to prevent chafing by the sails. I will serve mine.

I will stop pointing out faults in the AOTS, people treat it like the bible and get offended I think.

 

Cheers

Steve

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Hi Steve and Mike - I have been asking the same question elsewhere WRT the leading topgallant stay and agree it was probably served for the reasoning described by Steve earlier.  I have checked Steel, Lees and the AOTS with no joy so far as to a clear statement/description - I will check Parkin's drawings today.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Beautiful, neat work.

Something no one seems to mention: the short end of the shroud seizes foward round the deadeye on the starboard side, and aft on the port side.

Easy fix at this stage if you havn't done it this way.

 

Just checking.

 

Cheers Mike

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Thanks Mike, yes I have done the seizing as you described, that last pic is on the port side with the tail end seized aft of the shroud.

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On the subject of serving the topgallant shrouds I have found the following. Here is a diagram from Darcy Lever's "Young Sea Officers Sheet Anchor" which shows the shrouds only served where they reeve through the trestle trees, also a pic of the Endeavour replica showing the same setup. Lets go with this.

post-819-0-06750400-1436350982_thumb.jpg

post-819-0-30786000-1436351006_thumb.jpg

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Mizzen shrouds made and ready to get installed. I made the rope on my elcheapo ropewalk and served them on my wonderful Domanov serving machine.

post-819-0-58800400-1436603059_thumb.jpg

Edited by shipaholic

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Looking good, nice and neat mate!  Did you see this post from Steve (Hornet)  http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/10730-endeavour-shrouds-ratlines-moved-by-admin/ (post #12) 

 

For the topgallant shrouds I have followed the replica (photo from Steve) which shows the shrouds are served where they wrap around the mast and also at the points where they pass through the trestles.

 

Due to the limited size of holes I could make in the ends, I did not do the servings where they pass through the trestles as I could not get them to fit    :(

 

cheers

 

Pat

Edited by BANYAN

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Thanks Pat looks like between the other Steve and myself we have answered your question. You must be using too thick a thread if it wont fit through the holes. I have been very careful to get the scale of my rope right and I am surprised how thin the mizzen lower shrouds are, and thats at 1:51 scale. They look thick in the photo I just posted but they are only 0.75mm.

 

Steve

Edited by shipaholic

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Hi Steve, like you I have been careful to stay to scale.  The upper shrouds are only 0.25mm I think (need to check when I get home), but after serving with the thinnest cotton I could get, it takes them to close to 0.5mm.  The holes are 0.6mm but every effort to get a served line through causes damage :(  There is only about .025mm meat around the holes so I daren't ream them out much bigger (I will recheck scale of the trestles).  I am obviously doing something wrong  so will have to live with it :)

 

 

 They're done now without those tiny servings and look OK (only a few of us know they are missing ;))  If I start to feel too guilty about them I can come back and do them without losing much work/effort as the rattlin has not been done yet.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Hi Pat, yes I see what you mean, I just looked at my AL Endeavour and those trestle trees are really small. I also notice that only the two aft top gallant shrouds are rigged, then I looked at the AL instructions and that's what they say.

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I spent most of the weekend making the main stay and main preventer stay, lots of worming and serving. I am doing a collar around the bowsprit like the replica vessel for the mainstay. Very fiddly work doing the seizings with the collar in-situ

post-819-0-74422700-1438505874_thumb.jpg

post-819-0-42804100-1438506027_thumb.jpg

post-819-0-51624200-1438506051_thumb.jpg

Edited by shipaholic

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Very nice work Steve.  I will be doing this very soon - I have temporarily fixed to an eyebolt as it was easier to do a couple of other tasks; now I have something to aspire to :)

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Thanks Mike

 

The fore and main stays are Syren 1.37mm, the fore and main preventer stays are Syren 1.14mm. The main stay collar is 1.37

 

Cheers

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Hi Steve, like you I have had to fit the main stay collar insitu, What a mission! But the result was worth it. 

I will post pics soon. 

 

I havent yet stepped the mizzen mast. I am unsure as to wether I should follow AOTS with the higher mizzen or the traditional short mizzen.

 

What did the free mantle replica do? and what are you doing?

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Hi Mike
Yes it's quite a job doing the lashings on the collar in-situ.

The replica has a short mizzenmast and its one thing they got wrong, if you look at the mizzen channels on the replica they are wider than the fore and main channels otherwise the mizzen shrouds would foul against the rough tree rails because the mast is too short, not right. If you look at every other ship of the period the mizzen mast cap is level with the main top. The AOTS is correct in this regard.

I made my mizzenmast to the dimensions in the AOTS, looks good.

Greg the peg leg sailor sent me a very very good article that also claimed that the bowsprit on the replica and in the AOTS are too short as well because the main stay and the fore stay should be roughly parallel, which again is what you see in every other ship of the period. I was seriously contemplating removing my bowsprit and making a longer one. Might yet do that.

Cheers
Steve

Edited by shipaholic

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G'day Steve

I'm sorry if "I've put the spanner in your works".

I've have been told by the HMB ENDEAVOUR'S shipwright that he had quite a few disagreements with the committee who was in charge of the replica's construction about other things wrong with the ship. Minor stuff like missing crow feet on the masks, missing divats and bumkins. The latter 2 were not put on because of public tripping hazards and the docking problems.

Havagooday

Greg

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