DocBlake

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About DocBlake

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Pewaukee, WI, USA
  • Interests
    Building period furniture, aviation, sailing, model ship building.

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  1. Historically, the futtocks would have been bolted together to produce the frames. What would the correct diameter of the bolts be? May best estimate from research I've done is somewhere between 1" and 1-1/2". Any thoughts? Also, would it make sense to mark the locations of the deck clamps and gunport sills etc. on the frames prior to glueup?
  2. Nice work. I, too, thought about adding the mast, well and shot locker, but the cross section plans for the decks have been modified from the full build and won't work. This project was designed as an intro to scratch building, so necessarily simplified.
  3. Thanks guys!
  4. I'd like to try my hand at making my own rope. My original plan was to purchase a Byrnes Rope Walk. Unfortunately, Jim has decided not to produce the tool any longer. I would like something more permanent and sturdy than the Model Shipways product. Has anyone had experience with both the Byrnes machine as well as the Domanoff Rope Walk? How does Alexey's measure up? Any tips/tricks you've learned?
  5. Oil based wiping varnishes tend to add "warmth" to the wood. Water based poly leaves the wood "cold" looking, especially darker wood like cherry and walnut. I use water based only with very light woods like maple and birch. It dries crystal clear, while an oil based finish typically has an amber cast to it.
  6. Beautiful model. Well done!
  7. Just got my supply. Enough to rig shrouds and stays for the rest of my life!
  8. Pete: I looked at your build when I was first planning this project and filed away your building technique for future reference. I just reviewed your whole log and I plan to approach the build just as you did. Hopefully my results will be as good as yours!
  9. In the Midnight Hour - Wilson Pickett
  10. Thanks, Brian. I think I'm going to go with a building board and right angle jig for construction. I cut my false keel way long, and the keel and keelson long, also. I'll glue the false keel to the keel and this will give me plenty of room to screw the false keel into the building board to keep the component in place. When the build is done, the false keel gets cut off, freeing the model from the board. I finished rough sanding the frames inboard and outboard. There should be very little final fairing, and only smoothing to do once the frames are set...assuming the rebates for the keel and keelson are right on each frame! No pictures yet! In looking at the full build Triton plans, I noticed there is a scarph in the keel between frame O and frame B. The scarph is in the vertical plane and I plan to include it in the model. In fixing it's location, I noticed that there is a discrepancy between the full build plans and the cross section plans. In the cross section, the frames are labeled 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0, A, B, and C. The identical frames on the full build plans are labeled 4, 3, 2, 1, 0, A, B, C, and D. Does anyone know why the discrepancy?
  11. This model is being built in 1/24 scale: a scale that introduces a lot of problems in terms of scaling. For example, the layout lines for the parts and the profile views etc. are about 1/32" thick, leading to a lot of potential error especially in terms of room and space layout of the frames on the keel. What I'm wondering is if anyone can help me out with some pointers on building the jig to construct the model. How do I size the upper portion, with the cutouts for the frames, given that the frames are curved? How do I account for the slight curvature of the frames moving aft in the plan view? How do I keep consistent space bewtween fromes, given the thickness of the layout lines? I'm almost thinking of not using the 2 tiered jig as many have employed. Instead, after screwing the keel/false keel assembly to the building board, I'd set the first frame on the keel, use a standard precut spacer for the space between it and the second frame, then set the second frame. Using the standard spacer again, I'd set the third frame and so on. I would need to make a right angle jig to keep the frames square to the keel and their tops level, but I could avoid the upper tier of the jig. What do you think? Any advice or tips? Thanks so much for any help you all can lend!
  12. Tony: I'd like to PM you, but I get a message saying you can't receive messages. Can you post your email address or check my profile page for some questions I have? Thanks!
  13. Hi Tony!

     

    As you may know, I'm starting the Triton cross section in 1/24 scale:  a scale that introduces a lot of problems in terms of scaling.  For example, the layout lines for the parts and the profile views etc. are about 1/32" thick, leading to a lot of potential error especially in terms of room and space layout of the frames on the keel.  What I'm hoping for is that you can help me out with some pointers in building the jig to construct the model.  How do I size the upper portion, with the cutouts for the frames, given that the frames are curved?  How do I account for the slight curvature of the frames moving aft in the plan view?  How do I keep consistent space bewtween fromes, given the thickness of the layout lines?

     

    I'm almost thinking of not using the 2 tiered jig you and others have employed. Instead I'd set the first frame on the keel, use a standard precut spacer for the space between it and the second frame, then set the second frame.  Using the standard spacer again, I'd set the third frame and so on.  I would need to make a right angle jig to keep the frames square to the keel and their tops level, but I could avoid the upper tier of the jig.  What do you think?  Any advice or tips?  Thanks so much for any help you can lend!

     

    PS:  Thanks for your superb build log and model.  I really enjoyed it.

    1. tkay11

      tkay11

      I don't know why you can't access me through PM, unless the box is full or something. I'll have to figure it out.

      Building the jig was easy, I just set the height for the widest part of the cross-section -- i.e. the widest frame at it's widest height. I then measured the widths of all the frames at that height and printed the plan with all the frame markings. I put this on a sheet of plywood and cut out the part that would hold the frame. I then aligned that very carefully with the frame layout on the base, as you should see from my log, and drilled holes for the bolts through both pieces whilst still aligned. I then set the height for the cutout by placing the holding nuts at the right height.

      For consistent spacing, as you might seen from my log, my cutout was such that it had indents for each frame, so the indents acted as spacers. In terms of measurement, it's a question of consistency as to where you take the measurements from. In general I think the safest is to use the outside of the line, but that varies with the situation. Sometimes I use the middle -- e.g. between planks.

      The other method you propose of having a movable jig with set squares is possibly the more common method, and is one that is also used when making longer models of the full ship. It looks good to me, but for my particular purpose with the cross-section, I thought the jig method would be simplest.

      I'm always happy to help, so don't worry about pestering me!

      Tony

    2. DocBlake

      DocBlake

      Thanks, Tony!  That helps a lot.  Let me think about this a bit more.  I really did enjoy your build, and it will be a huge help to me going forward with mine.  Thanks again!

       

      Dave

    3. tkay11

      tkay11

      That's OK. I've emptied out my mail box now. It was full, so that should fix the problem with sending me PMs.

       

      Tony