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rcweir

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  1. The kit was from a company named Tehnoart, based in Riga, Latvia. They're now out of business but for a few years produced some amazing kits. The kit I used for the Peary was actually "#13" out of a limited run of 12. As best I can tell they produced 7 or 8 commercial kits of which two were relatively high volume: 1:192 kits for Sumner and Gearing class destroyers (I built a Sumner one before the Peary). Are you building a Houston? Bob
  2. Thanks for the compliments. Peary is important to me: I served on the 3rd Navy ship named after Robert E. Peary and intend to make models of all three. I did FF-1073 25 years ago. DD-226 here was finished recently. Sometime in the future I'll do DE-132. The Technoart kit I started with was a fiberglass/resin/brass kit they advertised as USS Ward and the kit as supplied would build what a typical Clemson looked like in the early '30s (in my opinion). By 1941 there was a wide divergence in how they all looked. So the challenge I ended up with was to choose a date and build the model so that it matched the way that Peary looked on that date. I chose October 1941 because that month she collided with USS Pillsbury on maneuvers and had to go into the shipyard for repairs. The war started before those repairs were complete and she was sunk in Feb. 1942 with no chance to ever have more than bandaids for the accumulating damage. Information that I could find on her appearance in those months was more than nothing but I still ended up making some guesses that aren't going to all be correct. Like the paint scheme or the absence of the fantail 3" AA gun.
  3. Built from a kit of USS Ward, this is how I believe Peary looked in October, 1941. That was the last time the ship was in operationally complete condition.
  4. Toni, the frames in the kit have etched marks along the edge but you don't mention them in your writeup. Should we ignore them? I've attached one example of what I'm talking about. Bob
  5. It will be fun to watch this build proceed. I noticed one small boo-boo in the printed plans - the ship is SS Robert E. Peary (not "USS") as it wasn't operated by the US Navy. The Navy did have two different Pearys of its own during WWII, though when this one was built in late '42 it had none.
  6. A nice item to add to the display of a 20th century ship model is a "ship cover", i.e. a poststamped envelope from the actual ship you've modeled. Collecting ship covers (sometimes called naval covers) was apparently an active specialization of stamp collecting, especially in the 1930-70s, and there are many listed on Ebay. Prices can be quite modest - $5-10 is typical - and many, many US ships are represented. The real magic of a cover to me is not so much the decorative image (if there is one) as the postmark - you know that on that date, on your ship, some postal clerk down in the post office made the stamp you see. Of special note to modelers of USS Constitution, I've seen a number of listings of commemorative covers from her tour in the early 1930s. I've attached images of a couple of covers of ships I have modeled. I just lay one or two inside the model case - there's no effort involved at all.
  7. I admit that I haven't looked specifically at this, but books published by the US Naval Insittute in the US are frequently co-published by a different publisher in the UK. In those cases the difference is mostly in the dustjacket. Odds are that that's what you are seeing. (If somebody out there has more specifics on the relationships between those publishers, I'd be interested in knowing.) Bob
  8. I ordered from them a couple of weeks ago with no problem. If I had your problem the first thing I would do is to try a different browser. Firefox and (Google) chrome can be installed on most operating systems.

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