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H.M.S. Triton Cross Section by Paddy - Scale 1:48


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Though I have not started the Triton’s keel I decided it would be alright if I started my build log. I have questions that come to mind that I would like to post to begin preparing for the steps forthcoming. The only thing that I known at this point is the False Keel will be milled out of African Blackwood and cutting its length long enough to screw mount* to my gantry building board as bbrockel mentioned in his log. I’m still thinking about the wood I should use for the Keel and Keelson.

 

One of the questions that I have concerns the cannons that will be used in the cross section. If I can count from photos I’ve seen in other logs it looks to be four but what is the caliber? Looking forward to joining you all and getting the keel step completed so I can take the next step and request access to the rest of the drawings.

 

This is going to be a fun project!

 

* Board drilled and tapped for 2-56 machine screw. My gantry type building board is made of MDF and is not quite complete but I'm getting closer. :)

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It is not to difficult to make them - some in the past have turned them in wood to avoid having to get a metal lathe. This may be too much so if buying  I believe the Triton held 9 pdrs on its primary deck (at least that is what the cross section plans show)..

 

Joss

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Welcome to the cross.  Once you get the keel done and they give you access to the download area you will see a section with the drawings of the cannons.  As Matrim said these were the 9pdrs. Think it would be fun to try and turn these ourselves,  then if it don't work out go out and buy some   :D

Looking forward to your build

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Joss: Thanks for the reply. Turning one in wood may be doable, but turning four that are duplicates now there’s the rub.

 

rocker: Thanks for the welcome and I look forward to being part of the group.

 

Pete: Thank you too for the welcome. I agree that turning the cannons ourselves would be fun to try and I’ll sure give at least one a go and see how it turns out. You may know that I’m now working an ebony swivel gun in the lathe now for the Batteau. I’ve temporarily stopped for now while I get the gantry system up and usable.

 

Russ: Thanks. So nine pounders they are. With Joss and Pete’s encouragement I may give them a try on the lathe. Getting four close enough may get me wrapped around the axle, but if I do one I’ll then have to try at least another.

 

Thanks again gents for your input.

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Paddy:

There is also the possibility of casting them. If you get one that you like out of your lathe, you can use that as a master and cast them. I have no personal experience with casting, but it is something I have seen done with great success and I will definitely have to give it a try at some point myself.

 

Russ

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Paddy,

all mine were turned on a lathe, whilst they are not exactley identical, you have to look closely to spot the differences. I did one first to work out an order to the process, then did four together. The idea is to do the same step on all four barrels, then move to the next step. This will help keep them similar, and is much faster than doing one barrel to completion at a time. Good to have you on board, look forward to seeing your progress.

 

Regards,

Grant.

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Hi Grant,

I have decided I’m going to turn the cannons. So, I thank you for the encouragement. As soon as I known their dimensions I’ll order enough blocks of Gaboon Ebony to do the turnings. The more I think about it the more I look forward to it. I’ve been working on a swivel gun on the lathe for another project and feel I’m beginning to make some progress; the lathe is a new acquisition.

 

The first photo is my second attempt and the cannon is turned in walnut then stained with a black Sharpie marker. The second photo is of the cannon in the lathe now and it’s being turned in Gaboon Ebony. Fingers crossed that it comes to a fair completion. BTW, the measurement is from the second reinforcement ring to the left to the start of the barrel muzzle on the right which is approximately 18 mm.

 

Have been working on the gantry system building board but maybe finished with it this weekend and can get back to finishing the cannon plus get started on the keel part of the Triton CS project.

 

Thanks again. I’m really looking forward to the start and joining all of you.

 

Cheers,

 

Paddy

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Hello Pete and Larry,

Thanks very much for that gents. When I attempt the four for the Triton I’ll just pretend that they were booty from four different foreign foundrys. :)

 

Looking at a printout of my Keel Parts Templates page and laying a straight edge on the Keelson there is a slight curve to it. Is this correct or has my printer run amuck?

 

Cheers

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Can anyone tell me or point me to a reference that has the type of wood the keel parts and frames of our Triton were constructed from? I would like to get an idea of the color thru the wood types used.

 

Thanks

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Paddy:

I suspect that the keel was made from English Oak or Elm. That was a typical choice for keels back then in England. I do not know if there is any source that would tell us what kind of timber was used for Triton specifically. There maybe a contract for one of her sister ships that would note that, but we did not have the resources to go into that kind of research as it was not a priority for the build.

 

Russ

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Thanks Russ. That sure gets me in the ball park I think. Somewhere I read that a lot of Oak was used but I can't remember where I read it. Seems there was mention of White Oak too. 

 

I do appreciate your input very much.

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Practicing on cutting the rabbet in the keel today. After trying a couple of things I put this on the router table. Not to bad other than the angle on the router bit was not acute enough. I’ll go surfing and see what I can find in a new bit that maybe close to the correct angle.

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Thanks very much for that Russ. I just spent some time going through Rusty's log and did notice his use of a V gouge to cut the rabbet in his keel. So, with your explanation and seeing Rusty's hand work I'm going to give the V gouge a go. Happen to have a small pfeil V-parting tool on hand that I have not used so out it comes tomorrow.

 

You've made my day, thank you. :)

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Patrick, if you have a small v-parting tool from Pfiel, by all means use it.  Just be careful.  These are extremely sharp and use a light touch.  Practice on a piece of scrap wood to get the feel for your chisel before tackling the project keel.  I made a couple of copies of the edge diagram if the keel and cut them out, glued them to either end of the keel and marked a line with a pencil showing the middle of the rabbit.  I then scribed over the pencil line a stylus to give the parting tool a line to follow.  Take your time and you will have a fine looking rabbit line. 

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Hi Paddy, according to Goodwin the keel would be made of elm "for it's durability when immersed in salt water" and the false keel could be made from beech, elm or teak. Teak because of its cheapness, beech and elm for their durability, 

Hope this helps,

Martin.

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I used a razor glued between two bits of wood so the wood would hold the angle. Repeated 'scrapings' work well plus by the amount of razor blade extending between the two wood pieces you can control depth and angle.

 

Joss

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Check out what I did on my first trial keel. I don't believe that it took over 15 minutes and I was able to control the depth and all "cuts" with easy.Could be done with a drill press. By grinding like this I did not have to worry about the grain catching a blade or anything. Could have finished with a quick back strapping with a razor ground to the correct shape. Grind most of it with a bit then back strap a few passes with a correctly shaped razor if you can't find a correctly shaped bit to start with..

Good Luck

 

Later 42rocker

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Great input gents on all accounts. It’s grand the way the group supports and encourages all the builders. Off  across the river now for lunch with my buddy. Can’t wait to get back and into the shop.

 

Thanks again to you all.   :)

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