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Maury S

Which direction do the tails of shrouds go?

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American convention, 1840s:  Do they go on the aft side both P & S or do they go one way on port and the other on stbd?

Maury

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It is entirely a function of how the rope was laid.   

post-1079-0-15819700-1463163384.jpg.af2d4de376b99cd02642474ff931267f.jpg

Dont have a source for this image off the top of my head, I stole it from google...    pretty sure its well described in Zu Mondfeld in a similar way, though referred to as right and left handed.  

 

 

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Justin is correct on this.  As shrouds were usually made up with cable laid rope, you just need to remember that the tail of the shroud should be on the right when the shroud is turned in.

 

John

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Thanks, all. Easy to see if the rope is not served.... and is the shroud always crossed before seizing?  Makes it kind of bulky.

Maury

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16 minutes ago, Maury S said:

Thanks, all. Easy to see if the rope is not served.... and is the shroud always crossed before seizing?  Makes it kind of bulky.

Maury

I’ve found bulkiness can come from disproportion in the chosen scale ropes and dead eyes.   When things are correct (or close to correct) then everything looks “right.”   But to answer your question, yes they should cross and be seized vertically at the throat.   There are probably many ways to accomplish the right look without actually seizing, but figuring a way to do it is more rewarding even if frustrating and fiddly.

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Maury,

There was also cutter-stay fashion used from about 1840 on, at least in Britain.  Not sure if this would have also been used for a US vessel at that time..  Keep in mind that the deadeyes had much wider scores to accommodate the cutter fashion shroud throat and round seizings.

 

If going with previous style rigging, the drawing Justin posted is from R.C. Anderson's book  The Rigging of Ships in the Days of the Spritsail Topmast page 94.   It is the same as given in Lees  Masting and Rigging, but note the fine print, the drawing from Anderson is as viewed from outboard.  For a more detailed drawing, albeit from inboard, check page 42 in Lees Masting and Rigging.  

 

Allan

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Thanks Justin and Allan, very useful.  Maury, I hope you don't mind, bt does anyone know if this was applicable for wire rope shrouds turned on a Thimble also.  I believe most wire rope was all RHL?

 

cheers

 

Pat

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I just reviewed a source (can't find right now) showing "round seizings" on a wire shroud and "throat seizing" on hemp.  I'll try to relocate.

Maury

 

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