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Captain Al

HMS Bounty by Captain Al - FINISHED - Artesania Latina - Scale 1:48

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Hi Al,

 

I'm thinking it will be easier to rig the restraining lines and blocks when I can still hold the cannon in hand.

 

 

Definitely :) .

 

Rather than try to explain all the gun rigging, take a look at my build log of Vulture from HERE . I've fully detailed all the rigging over several pages.

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Hi Al,

 

I found your build log in early January and have been waiting anxiously for further updates….as I just started the same AL Bounty build.

 

You've been an inspiration for me as this will be my first major build as well. Your log is full of excellent advice/wisdom from both yourself as well as several others that have been contributing along the way.

 

I recently started a build log and would really appreciate your input to aid in my humble effort.

 

Keep up the great work  :)

 

Boyd  

Edited by thomaslambo

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Seems like I'm only updating this log when I have a problem.  At the moment I have several, but I'll focus today on just one.... how to proceed with attaching the deadeyes through the channels and onto the chains.  I've posted this issue under a rigging forum and received a couple helpful replies.  But I thought someone who is actually working on or has completed this AL Bounty kit could give me a tip.  Here's the problem (which the pictures should illustrate).  I followed the directions and put 1.5mm holes into the channels appropriately spaced.  Now I'm putting the strops on the deadeyes (well, trying to) and I find that the 2 strands of stropping (kit calls for 1mm brass wire) will not fit through the 1.5 mm hole.  I'm trying to reach a conclusion as to how to deal with this and the options seemingly are: (1) drill or ream out the holes, (2) cut slots back to the holes so the strops can slide back into the holes, (3) fill the holes and cut (or file) notches on the outer edge of the channels for the stropping (and then cover the notches with a strip of wood, (4) improvise something bizarre like using smaller wire for the stropping, even perhaps thread.  Simplest seems like (1).  That would just be a matter of how big to make the holes.  Would the holes just need to accommodate the two strands of wire (ie 2 mm), or wider so I can form an eye at the end of the strop and still fit it through the holes?  I can't make these holes too wide since there's so many in a row. 

 

Here's some photos to illustrate.  Included one of the instruction books pix.

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Hi Al,

 

On my AL Supply I had the same issue. I bent the eyes into the bottom of the wires first (which means NOW at the stage you are) and then elongated the holes lengthways in the channel just large enough to slip the eyes through. The deadeye covers the slot, and the Chains will stop them from pulling upward.

 

Don't fit the chains yet - you need to determine their proper angles by using a piece of thread from the tops of the lower masts. Don't rely on the positions indicated in the AL plans, they could be a long way out.

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Great advice on positioning the chains.  I will definitely hold off on that step.  Now, to make sure I understand what you did let me put it in my own words -- you did not cut slots from the front of the channels into which you slipped the lower part of the strop.  You had a round hole in the channel and you cut a little slot in the hole just big enough to push the eye of the strop down through it.  Sort of a variation on just enlarging the hole, but more secure and less intrusive of the rest of the channel.  That sounds like the perfect solution.  Thanks so much Danny.

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Hi Al,

 

I just went back through my computer and found my method of making the Chains on HMS Supply - a bit different to the way I remembered them, but neat nonetheless :) . Here are some pics to show you how they worked :

 

Chains 001.jpg

 

I flattened the ends of the chains by squeezing them in my vise :

 

Chains 003.jpg

 

Chains 007.jpg

 

Chains 008.jpg

 

Aligning the Chains with the mast top :

 

Chains 005.jpg

 

The finished articles :

 

Chains 009.jpg

 

Chains.jpg

 

The holes in the Channels only need to be large enough to slip the chain itself through.

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Danny you're the best....thanks for these pictures.  It looks like the deadeye holes are staggered along the channel.  Mine are straight in line but I suppose this is cause these are not from Bounty, but HMS Supply.  Can you remember what gauge or diameter wire you used on these?  Thanks again Dan.  Without your continuous help I think I'd have let my build sail into the sunset long ago -- and that would have been without sails!!

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I think I have the process down.  Now I just need to take more care in the real application.  Placement of the hole in the chain needs to be better -- I should probably use a punch to start it and/or do a smaller pilot hole first.  I'm using 1.2mm rod here which worked a little better than the 1.0mm wire.  I couldn't flatten the end in my vise so I used a sledge hammer and an anvil.  Taped the rod to the anvil first so it wouldn't twist.  Three blows I think did it.  Then a bit of clean up with a file.

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Hi Al,

 

I think I also used 1.2mm rod. If you heat the end of the rod to red hot over a gas flame and then let it cool without quenching it will soften the brass enough to make it more workable. The wire I used was already a "soft" type.

 

One point - make sure the centre hole in the deadeye is to the bottom. You have it upside-down, but it will probably turn in the wire with a bit of persuasion. The centre hole in the upper deadeye will go to the top.

 

Fore Shrouds.jpg

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Thanks for another tip Danny.  I can't believe how much minute detail all this model building entails, most of it I'm sure being quite important in the end.  Of course what I showed above (bad photos I admit) is a sample and I'll definitely be watching out for those holes.

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Al,

 

it's good to see you moving forward with the rigging....I'll be paying close attention. 

 

And very helpful advise from Danny....thanks much.

 

Boyd

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Well I don't know if you could say I'm moving forward with the rigging or just kind of planning for it.  Most of my time the last 2 weeks have been in putting blocks on the deck and hull and experimenting with ways to make my chainplates and deadeyes.  The pre-planning has been extremely useful.  All the above suggestions and comments have given me the confidence start the process.  But first I will build and mount the bowsprit, mount all the half pound guns and the anchors, and build and mount the launch.  I already have built the jolly boat so I've really got a head start - ha ha ha.  After that I suppose you have to build and put up the masts before any real rigging is done.

 

Just so this log isn't too boring with questions and samples, here's a few pictures of my 90% completed deck.  I only have the blocks around the foremast to do.  Down below I'll stick in some ballast, hammocks, bales and whatever else comes to mind and will fit.  I love the detail work you've been doing Boyd.  Its inspiring.

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Al,

 

Thanks for the kind words and you're Bounty is looking beautiful.

 

Having read your log page by page....all I can say is you're a kind and humble gentleman :)   

 

It's a pleasure following your build and I think you under estimate how much you've helped mine. 

 

Boyd

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Keith, no paint is planned.  Except of course for such things as barrels and other little tidbits.  I have spruced up the transom's decorations a bit with black paint.  That was for no other reason but to contrast a bit with the brass filigree stuff.

 

I do appreciate both your kind words.  It gives me encouragement to keep it up.  I've gotten away from describing all the pitfalls I run into and how I have worked around them.  My earliest posts were like a primer on how not to build a model.  Now when I run into difficulties I think its more from lack of foresight or plain inexperience.  The one thing I can't reconcile myself to is that so often the plans or instructions are just wrong.  I'm getting better at recognizing that and trusting in my own concepts and measurements. Having sailed my own boat for years I understand some things about how ships are put together and how things need to work, but that's a far cry from understanding an 18th century square rigger.

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Boyd, you might want to pick up on this bit of methodology.... the hardest part for me in putting all those double blocks around the mast was being precise with where I would drill a pilot hole.  On one of them 13 holes needed to be put around the mast hole.  Being an anorak (see Mike Dowlings comments if you don't know that term) I thought the holes should be exactly spaced and in the same location as the plans showed.  And I knew I could not duplicate that visually and my pin vise tends to slip a little before digging into the already varnished deck.  So what I did was:  traced the plans onto a bit of tracing paper; making dots where the holes had to be.  Then I transferred that to another little bit of heavier construction paper, poking holes into the construction paper where the dots were, and punching a larger hole in the center which would be the mast hole.  Then, making sure I had the "template" oriented fore and aft correctly (cause the holes are not laid out symmetrically or evenly around the hole), I laid it over the mast hole and taped it to the deck.  So then I was able to put the drill bit into the little holes I'd poked and drill down into the deck.  Worked very well to get good spacing.  Still it was a tricky maneuver to insert the pins and hook the block's beckets into the eyes and close them up.  I chose to use brass eyebolts on the blocks rather than tie beckets with tread cause I know I couldn't tie 10 knots in that close quarters.  In looking at other builds and how blocks are attached to eyes, I know that this method is not authentic and is kind of the lazy man's way, but I'm just not good enough or don't have the right tools to get those knots correct.  As I build the masts and yards I hope I can do less of the brass eyes and more thread stropping of the blocks with beckets.

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I still think the term 'anorak' could be appropriate for anyone with so much attention to detail. And, since I seem to be the man of the moment regarding definitions, please see my comments with regard to 'kit bashing' on another post !

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I chose to use brass eyebolts on the blocks rather than tie beckets with tread cause I know I couldn't tie 10 knots in that close quarters. 

 

 

Here's a tip Al. Lash the blocks to the eyebolts on the bench BEFORE you fit them to the deck. Much easier :) .

 

A needle threader is a great help for tying line through the blocks. There are various types - all work very well. The ones with the thicker wire and the one with the long wire are particularly useful when rigging around the bottom of the mast or under the mast tops :

 

Needle Threaders 002.jpg

 

:cheers:  Danny

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Once again I'm needing to thank you Dan.  Yes of course, that does make much more sense.  I mean that's how I've done so many other things -- off the ship first, then attach -- that I don't know why I've been thinking of tying these on in these tight spaces.  Maybe cause I had to do that with the cannon?  Maybe I didn't need to with those either.  Oh well.  Live and learn, right?  Now, as far as threading these blocks, I didn't know there was a real tool made for the job.  On the cannon blocks and tiller rigging I used my wife's thinnest sewing needle.  Worked OK but sometimes it was a bit short and hard to get into the sheave hole.  Sometimes even used needle nose pliers to hold the needle.  Any port in a storm.  I'm going to find these Birch threaders somewhere; probably on-line.

 

This brings up some points I hope will help others -- I learned quickly that if using the eyebolts as beckets you have to make sure you don't put them through the sheave hole.  Best to find this out before they're on the boat and you're trying to run some thread through them.  I've tested all mine with the needle that I had intended to use to thread the blocks before I put a drop of CA on.  I'm still searching for the perfect applicator to put a minute drop of CA right where the eye meets the block -- or just as often where the eye meets the deck or hull or anywhere.  I've read many suggestions and purchased several cheap plastic applicators (none worked to put a really tiny drop on) and so far the best thing I've found (from a msw thread) is a medium size sewing needle with the eye cut off to make a fork.  I hate to have CA get into the eye or even drip down and clog the sheave.

 

Finished the foremast blocks today.  Heck, my picture was too big to upload.

 

 

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Al,

I have used an applicator called the "Glue Looper" and it works really well.  They come in a pack with three sizes but I am still on the first tip after a few months of use. 

 

It only works with thin CA. They use any standard Xacto type blade holder.  It allows placement of a very fine drop.  I have been using it for various parts of my build and it works well.  I periodically use a lighter to burn off any residue which keeps it clean and reusable.  After a few months I finally took it apart after soaking in acetone, then soaked all the parts in the acetone and put it back together. Good as new.

 

I am finally going to use another blade but that is because I need to use the smaller one for some really fine gluing.

 

They were cheap enough that I figured it was worth a try.  The glue tips are around $12 and shipping about $3 if bought directly from the manufacturer, cheaper than Amazon.

 

It is made and sold by Creative Dynamic LLC

 

Here's the web address.  www.creativedynamicllc.com

 

Richard

Edited by Dan Vadas

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Al,

 

I've been using CA for years on model airplanes and RR models.

 

Loopers work well.  Here is a link: http://www.creativedynamicllc.com/new-v2-looper.html

 

 

I've also been using tooth picks and needles very effectively with CA.  You just need to experiment with applying it until you get comfortable with how much ends up on what you're gluing.  Get some small pieces of scrap wood and play around for an hour or so and you'll have it wired  :)

 

I use CA on almost all my very small parts with excellent results.  The goal (very difficult in deed) is the viewing eye should not see glue on the model...which is very hard to cover up or remove after the fact.

 

I've tried many brands of CA, some dry instantly and others give you some limited time to set the parts (not all CA's are created equal  :().  I make sure all my pieces are clean and ready to be glued and then I rehearse putting them together quickly.  In many cases I use stabilizers to get them squared and straight quickly.  I also lay most of the parts on wax paper so they don't stick to my work surface (tape the wax paper down).

 

Here is a link to my favorite CA (I also use their thin product on occasion):  http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXPT39&P=ML

 

I get about 10-15 seconds to adjust parts with their Medium product. 

 

If you read Chuck's latest build log he comments that he uses CA exclusively on his planking jobs....which I would say is one of the finest planking jobs I've seen in my very short career of wooden ship modeling  :)

 

Good luck

Edited by thomaslambo

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Thanks guys.  Will search for these loopers.

 

BTW, is there something amiss with the notification system -- regarding builds or threads we want to "follow?"  I've had no notices via email for weeks but when I look at My Content I find replies to lots of things I'm supposed to be following?  Also, the private email system seems not to be functioning either.  Any knowledge of those issues?

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Hi Al.

You have made a lot of Exelent progress since my last catchup on your build.

Your workmanship is realey good.

Lots of nice hints and advice on your build.

 

Regards Antony.

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Thanks guys.  Will search for these loopers.

 

BTW, is there something amiss with the notification system -- regarding builds or threads we want to "follow?"  I've had no notices via email for weeks but when I look at My Content I find replies to lots of things I'm supposed to be following?  Also, the private email system seems not to be functioning either.  Any knowledge of those issues?

Al,

 

I think so, I've had some issues as well.

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Thanks guys.  Will search for these loopers.

 

BTW, is there something amiss with the notification system -- regarding builds or threads we want to "follow?"  I've had no notices via email for weeks but when I look at My Content I find replies to lots of things I'm supposed to be following?  Also, the private email system seems not to be functioning either.  Any knowledge of those issues?

 

Take a look here: http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/9808-no-mails-for-me-robin-b/

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