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Hi,

 

i'm in the market for an electric scrollsaw; Any recommendations? I was looking a the proxxon DSH. The middle one in the proxxon line. Do any of you have experience with this or a similar machine? Proxxon machines aren't exactly cheap. I don't really mind that they are rather expensive, as long as they live up to their pricetag.

 

Thanks for your thoughts.

 

Wouter.

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Wouter,

 

I too don't have a Proxxon scroll saw, but do own the DeWalt 788.  I hear Proxxons are very nice tools.  The DeWalt is an excellent scroll saw - deep throat for longer wood pieces, very low vibration, and adjustable speed.  The slower speeds are good for very tight radius work.  If those are also attributes of the Proxxon you are looking at then it sounds like a good choice.  I find my scroll saw very useful for many small modeling cuts and tasks.

 

Cheers,

 

Elia

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I just bought a used Ryobi scrollsaw from a fellow for $30. I already made some modifications such as a 'no clearance' table top. I use the blades that don't have the two prongs to do that. The saw has a variable speed control and thus far I am able to cut thin plywood without any tear-out on the back side. I think it will serve me well until I feel the need for a better version.

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I recently got the very affordable Ryobi scroll saw, but have only used it a couple of times so far.  One annoyance is that the plastic insert around the blade does not sit flush to the table.  I made a plastic shim ring to eliminate that.

 

However, it sounds like Jay may have a better solution that also solves other issues with it.  Jay -- could you expand on your modifications to the saw?

 

Thanks,

Robert

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Wouter

I have an OLD Craftsman. It vibrates but gets the job done. The biggest thing I have found is use good blades. I like Olsen blades. They will last much longer and out of the bag are much sharper so make cleaner cuts. I also don't use the blower that they all come with they just blow the dust around the shop. I use my vaccum. Just hook it to the arm.

 

Mark

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I recently got the very affordable Ryobi scroll saw, but have only used it a couple of times so far.  One annoyance is that the plastic insert around the blade does not sit flush to the table.  I made a plastic shim ring to eliminate that.

 

However, it sounds like Jay may have a better solution that also solves other issues with it.  Jay -- could you expand on your modifications to the saw?

 

Thanks,

Robert

Robert all I did in this case was to take a section of 1/8 birch plywood and drilled a hole just big enough so the saw blade can pass through. Then I first applied several strips of double back tape to the back side of the plywood with the paper still on it. I positioned the plywood with the blade loosely in place and peeled away the paper of the tape and pressed the plywood in place on the table. 

I tightened the blade in place and slowly started the saw. It took a few hickups and manually turning the motor shaft (it has a screwdriver slot in the end) until the blade found its 'home'.

I hope this all makes sense.

I know what you mean about the insert getting lost. I tried to make one out of the plywood but it did not want to stay in place. So I thought why not the whole table. I have done the same with my disk sander, band and table saw.

post-246-0-32588200-1362094582.jpg

Sorry no picture yet of the scroll saw.

BTW the piece of plywood I am using is 10 x 10 inches. So it takes a bit of jockeying it around to get it lined up before removing the paper. Don't press down until you feel the blade and hole are pretty closely in place. I have not yet changed blades and hope that won't be too much of a struggle. If nothing else I may have to enlarge the hole a bit.

Edited by Modeler12
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Hi wouter,

I have a Proxxon DS 230 E, and it works very well.

Probably maybe a little more expensive, though it is an entry level, but in Italy we say: "Who pays more, pay less"  (after)

Edited by fabius.b
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Have a DeWalt scroll saw and it works fine. Bought a used RBI Hawk for the wife and I use it every chance that I get. The RBI Hawk is one of the better saws out there. Really like it. Check it out.

 

http://www.bushtonmanufacturing.com/WebsitePages/Products.html

 

Later Tim

Edited by Tim C
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I'm using a Hitachi that I got for a good price.  Quiet, relatively vibration free.  I made a zero clearance plug from plywood shimmed to be perfectly flat with the table. I'll make a post on my blades when I get home tonite.   Greg H. (dvm27) recommended them on the old site and all my info is at home. 

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Excellent!  Thanks Jay.

 

Robert

Robert here are a couple pictures of my 'mod' for the Ryobi scroll saw.

As I explained above, I put a sheet of 1/8 inch birch plywood on top of the table. Located and drilled a small hole for the blade to go through, etc. The first picture below shows this setup as well as my addition of a PVC elbow to redirect the saw dust. This will be painted black and hooked up to a vacuum system later on. I removed the hold-down foot and blower for this picture, but will re-install the foot but not the hose.

 

post-246-0-51622100-1362198644.jpg   post-246-0-02887700-1362198666.jpg

 

The second picture is a sample of cutting a random shape out off the same plywood. I turned the piece up-side-down to show that there is a little fuzz on top where I turned the corner a bit too fast. But otherwise the 'tear-out' was minimal.

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Thanks Jay!  That's a much more effective modification than simply making a shim to fit under the plastic insert.  Kills a couple of birds with one stone -- provides a uniformly flush table, and zero tolerance opening!

 

Cheers,

Robert

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Hi everybody,

 

Thanks for yout toughts and advices. I guess i'll go with the proxxon DSH. I don't think I need a professional workshop machine, I don't have the budget nor the space for such. 

 

Thanks,

 

Wouter.

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Thanks Jay!  That's a much more effective modification than simply making a shim to fit under the plastic insert.  Kills a couple of birds with one stone -- provides a uniformly flush table, and zero tolerance opening!

 

Cheers,

Robert

Wouter, I hope you don't mind me adding one more suggestion for Robert.

 

Since I got this scroll-saw at a bargain price, I still had to do some experimenting. With the 'zero clearance' table mod I am able to get pretty close to no tear out on the back side. But I was curious if I could improve how steady the blade is while in motion. Bandsaws have guides for the blades and I thought this might work on a scroll-saw. The first picture below shows my experiment of using a piece of oak. I cut a groove part way and double back taped that behind the blade. It worked quite well and I was able to follow a line better than I had done before. I may make a better setup rather than using double back tape. But at least the idea worked.

post-246-0-91540500-1362595900.jpg  post-246-0-77857700-1362595915.jpg

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On many of the machines a new thin plywood table makes a major difference.

One of the other items to think about is does the machine take only one type of blade, pegged (?, with the wire posts on the ends) or does it clamp on?

Next is using good blades. Many machines have been "fixed" by changing to a good blade.

Also is the amount of sanding that your looking to do. Or are you looking for a almost finished surface after cutting? If your going to be sanding after to bring to true then rough cut is ok.

More to think about.

 

Later Tim

Edited by Tim C
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Good points Rocker,  thank you.

 

If your machine only uses the clamp-on blades, just knock the pin out of the blades that come that way. Loosely hold the blade on top of a vise with the pin down, and you can tap the pin out. It is just welded in place. If the blades are too long, cut them shorter and clamp them.

 

I agree to using good blades, but I am confused with your latter comment about 'some machines are fixed' (a bit like our cat?). By the same token, just like Exacto blades, the blades are disposable and can easily be replaced. I hate sanding, and I don't like being fixed.  :angry:  ;)  :(

 

Seriously though, a good machine is worth the money if you are careful in the selection. When you get one be sure to EXPERIMENT and learn what it can and cannot do. Break a few blades and find out.

I did that with mine and found a couple ways to improve what I had. I am still improving the scroll-saw and other tools. But that is only a side line of working on my model.

 

Meanwhile I have improved the blade guide and made it so it can be mounted on the foot with two screws and be 'replaceable. The real advantage of having a guide near the bottom is to help prevent the blade from curving away when making a curved cut. In other words, when you put a slight force on the work piece that goes sideways, the blade tends to want to bend also. It results in not being able to follow the line you want to cut. The guide block helps to reduce that.

 

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Here is my final set-up of supporting the blade laterally. I made an oak block as shown in the drawing, drilled and tapped two #4-40 holes in the hold-down foot of the machine and used a couple screws to hold the guide in place.

post-246-0-58936000-1362872693.jpg

 

I made four more to keep in reserve. The 1/8 inch wide slot is so I can make final adjustments fore and aft.

post-246-0-25831700-1362872713.jpg

 

Again this worked like a charm and I believe it could be a nice add-on feature to any scroll saw.

 

 

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I have a used Ryobi, and placed a thin plywood table on it after realizing the table was slightly bowed up on one side. It may have been dropped. The level was just a small fraction off, and could not be noticed by eye. It only caused a problem when cutting from that one side. I initially thought my cuts were not square because I bent the blade while pushing too hard. It was only when I put a steel ruler across the table that I saw daylight. ( The only reason I was doing that was in trying to replace the plastic insert which was causing it's own problems.)

Larry Davis

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Any thoughts on the lower end saws?  The scroll saw I used to have access to is no longer available, so I am looking at geting one of my own.  I would not use it much, only to cut out frames/bulkheads and the like, and I don;t have much room in condo.  Most work is done in the garage on a folding table, although a more robust table is availabe on the back porch.

 

I have seen some discussion involving Ryobi.  I have also been looking at Skilcraft and Craftsman.  Has anybody had any experience with these?

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Hi Chuck,

 

We're in a condo too, so space was also a consideration for me.  The Ryobi is small, light weight, and very easy to move around.  It was also the least expensive ($99).

 

I've used it several times so far and it works pretty good.  However, the biggest issue, as addressed earlier in this topic, is the plastic insert in the table.  It does not sit flush with the table.  It’s recessed by about 1mm, and that presents quite a problem, that absolutely has to be addressed!  The temporary shim I made is okay, but a more permanent solution like Jay’s is definitely a necessity.

 

In retrospect, I probably should have looked at other saws, as having to “fix” a brand new tool is a nuisance and just seems wrong on principle.

 

Robert

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