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Hello

I have planned for many years to go fully scratch, over time I have bought machinery like the Byrnes tablesaw, disc sander and thickness sander.

I still have no lath or mill but thats another story

 

I tried my hands on milling some strip wood for the first time the other day. So I figured I´d show you what can be done whith theese machines and a little practice

I have had some Apple logs on seasoning for a few years, the ends of the logs were covered by silicone so there is a minimum of cracks although some of then do have cracks.

 

I used a hand held mitre saw to cut the log lengthwise. this was hard work but I had to achieve a straight cut in order to use the bandsaw. My bandsaw is a low quality machine with a thin blade that tends to wander of if I dont have a straight cut up against the ripfence.

 

Using the band saw I cut billets about 1cm thick and as straight as possible, I guess a better bandsaw can be an idea but they cost a lot of money and let´s face it how often do we cut logs.....I think I will contact a carpenter for some help in cutting the rest of the logs

 

I used the Byrnes thickness sander to flatten the billets and then the table saw with a slitblade (to minimize loss of wood) to cut strips from the billets. Finally I pushed the strips through the thickness sander yet again to make sure they are of equal thickness. 

 

Comments are wellcome of cource

 

Regards

Erik

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Somethng to think about and then try out. Get a piece of something like 1/4" plywood then cut a small runner (piece of wood to run in your track on your table saw) glue the runner to that piece of plywood then clamp the wood you want a straight cut on to the plywood then run it thru the table saw, with the edge to be straighten hanging over. Hopefully this will straighten out one side flip 90 degrees and run thru again. Hopefully you have two straight edges and a 90 degree angle. This can now be cut on the regular saw table. There clear as mud. Think sliding platform then wood is clamped to that will make a first straight cut.

Good Luck. If you can't see it in your mind, pm me and I'll try to get pics later to post and show. Might take a day or two to get them posted.

 

Later 42rocker

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This is what I think 42Rocker was talking about:  http://www.micromark.com/sliding-table-for-microlux-tilting-arbor-table-saw,7505.html

You can make on or buy one.  I made one for my 10-inch table saw to play with cutting logs. Works a treat. Also I bought one for my MM table saw (3" blade) as I was having a lazy moment and decided to buy rather than make one.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Mark

That is close but not it. Reason is while that setup is great for cutting 90 degree safely,, when cutting real rough stuff the wood can roll or move on you, mainly while ripping wood not cross cutting.

Try this.

Look at the picture, Ok, can't use a mouse to draw with very well but. Lets try it anyway.

You take a close cut runner (blue) that just fits the slot in your table saw and mount on it a sheet of plywood to which you attach a clamp (red) of some nature the top screw (metal color) holds the wood to the sliding table. Therefore you can rip a long piece. If clamped well (most jigs use two or more) then the rough wood is tightly held to the floating plywood table. Hopefully not moving. After a few passes then most flip the wood so the "trued" edge is now down and several more passes are made. I showed this on a table saw however the jig can be used on a bandsaw also. Due to the slower blade you can control it better.

So what do you folks think. I know a picture of the real thing would be better sorry, I had and used something like that but took it apart several years ago. While quick and easy to make I'm working on other things rights now. There is a plumbing project heading my way tomorrow that is going to be done before any hobby stuff, or so I'm told. LOL, but I still listen.

 

Later 42rocker

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Ok... I've seen something like that.  Usually a mod to a sliding table like I posted.   Somewhere, and I forget where since it was posted on the lost MSW, there's a good article on harvesting and sawing raw wood.  I thought I had a link but I'm not finding it.  Seems it was a repost of something from the NRG journal.  I think I've seen something like that in the sawmills.... 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Erik

This might help better than my bad drawing.

 

Mark

Finally found a pic somewhat like I remembered. 1st I called Grizzy, yes they said we used to sell that sled, don't anymore. So looked around and found the following two websites.

1st Interesting close but seems like a lot of money

http://www.carterproducts.com/product.asp?product_id=542&cat_id=75

2nd looks a lot closer and home made for a lot less money.

http://woodgears.ca/shop-tricks/bandsaw_sled.html

 

Enjoy Life.

 

Later 42rocker

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Hello 42rocker

Thanks for the info. I think your drawing is fine. Thanks for the links also.

I see you quartered the log and assume from there it was quarter sawn. I've been studying the importance of plain/quarter/rift sawn lumber and how this effects the overall stability of the wood.

Here and interestimng link which has an interesting picture of diagrams showing the difference. This also shows 2 variations on quarter sawn, with 1 center slab vs 2 which is interesting. To my understanding a radial cut is always preferable.

 

http://www.northendhardwoods.com/2010/09/quarter-sawn-vs-plain-sawn-vs-rift-sawn-lumber/

 

 

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One of the places I've learned most about wood and it character is watching the woodwright shop which PBS has online for viewing. Sadly its just got the 2006 season to present rather then all 27 or 28 seasons.

I recently spend a week or two and rewatched them all, great show.

 

http://www.pbs.org/woodwrightsshop/video/3200/index.html

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have a large pile of cedar and i"m looking to use some in my models. I'm thinking a small table saw and a small plane thicknesser would do the job . Cedar very soft though, and I'm not sure if it's usable for a lot of parts. I just finished the Colonial Brig Perseverance by Modellers Shipyard, and replaced a few parts that came in ply with the Cedar. I think it looks better that way and it saved me from doing extra work over the ply. I replaced the Tiller for example. How would you mill down to small planks though?.

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  • 3 years later...

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