Jump to content

Joe100

Members
  • Content Count

    219
  • Joined

  • Last visited

3 Followers

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male

Recent Profile Visitors

1,175 profile views
  1. Not sure I follow Peter. Can you be more specific about what you’re after?
  2. Very nice, thank you. I’ll just leave it off
  3. Thanks BE! However, the question is more about where the flag lines would be attached, if the gaff is lowered and lashed to the boom? I doubt I’ll have the ensign on the model, but I would like to make sure the rigging is there. thanks!
  4. Greetings! I’m building a diorama of HM Cutter Alert under easy sail with the mainsail and gaff lowered. I’ve seen some drawings and painting depicting this, and it’s allowing me to not only depict the ship under sail but show off the rigging too. The big mainsail is impressive, but it’s blocking a lot of detail. My question is this: With the main gaff lowered, how would the flag be rigged, if at all? Would it still be connected to the main boom? This seems to be a fairly extreme angle. Or would the storm gaff be rigged and the flag rigging connected there? Tha
  5. Thanks guys. I believe the story about her turning over by firing all 14 guns is apocryphal. Other ships had similar turret layouts without issue, and the righting force calculations would have been done before the design even left the paper. It would take a lot of force to roll a 30,000 ton ship. It was found that SMS Viribus Unitis and her 3 sisters were dangerously top heavy. In a full rudder deflection turn, the ship’s heel could overmatch the righting moment causing the ships to capsize. They seem to nearly turned one of them over at one point and quickly taken the
  6. Thanks guys! Progress is being made, these photos are a little old. The forward superstructure is finished sans tripod mast and bridge, but after that we’re on to rigging.
  7. Progress so far. Now that we’re out of the boring hull-shaping and sea base carving stage, progress will be a little more quick.
  8. Thanks! However this isn’t the first Dreadnought-type I’ve built in 1/1500 so it should be fairly straight forward. Here are a couple others:
  9. Greetings. I decided a while back that I didn’t want to build models of warships already available as plastic kits, but if I keep to this rule, I won’t be building many in the future. I can guarantee you won’t see me building Bismarck or Yamato anytime soon, or anything WWII for that matter. I’m breaking this rule here for Agincourt as Flyhawk just released their kit within the last year or so. It’s a gorgeous model though. So recently I was able to find a nice set of plans for Agincourt, but sadly they depict her in 1918 after much fiddling by the Royal Navy and I wanted
  10. I use it for shaping hulls out of the boxwood blocks. Also I can sand circular areas of superstructure like barbettes etc
  11. It’s an Aikeec. It’s a very solidly made little machine. I’ve had it apart to clean and service it and I was quite impressed with the build quality. It runs on standard 10mm x330mm belts too. Adjustable table and belt tensioner, across multiple axis. it’s easily broken down and used a s standard power supply, and since the wires are exposed you could change the power supply of you like.
×
×
  • Create New...