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Dr PS - Paul Schulze

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Everything posted by Dr PS - Paul Schulze

  1. Decided to make my own bucket. Glued small wood strips around suitable dowel then drilled most of dowel out of center. Prototype bucket would be 10 inches in diameter.
  2. In order to make uniform rope coils, I used this simple construct. The side wood pieces glued on the dowel keep the coils from sliding down. The enlarged hole facilitated tying the rope off. After coiling, diluted white glue was applied. After the glue was dry, the knot was cut away.
  3. I can’t take the credit as the idea originated from Chuck in a post to Arthur. Then Arthur directed me to the reference Go to entry #55 and you will see where I got my approach.
  4. Sea Hoss, I think you are right. I addressed this somewhat on my build. Not sure it is historically correct but from what I can gather, a lot of the armed longboats were retrofitted longboats. If that is so, I think we should have some wiggle room for invention.
  5. I’m not done with the rigging yet but I decided to spend time and get the oars done. I carved and painted 13 oats just in case one didn’t turn out. They all turned out fairly well so I tied two bundles of six as per instructions. I’m not sure what to do with the thirteenth oar. Maybe I’ll mount it on the display base I want to make. After painting, I sprayed the oars with the matte finish in order to seal them.
  6. Tiger, I don’t know if you read my solution (post entry #74) to the center seat problem, but I simply cut the aft board off of it and replaced it with a wider one.
  7. Very nice Arthur. You have pointed out and completed some nice improvements which I should have probably caught but did not. Your boat is a remarkable build and one of which you should be very proud. BTW, I love the backdrop for your boat 🚣‍♀️
  8. Just a few shots of the rigging which is almost finished. No real problems were encountered although I decided to use a thinner tan line than the kit supplied rope for the running rigging. The line I used was 0.7mm. Also, instead of using the kit supplied horse traveler, I opted for a rope loop attached to a block.
  9. I think your pirogue is indeed very cool. I find that as a possibility for me to try sometime. Considering your cockpit seat problem, a possible work around might be to cut the fore part of the starboard side so that it is parallel to the thwart and also even with the port side. Then make the thwart notches deeper so that it can be moved aft and butt up against the starboard and port cockpit seats. I agree with Arthur, keep up the log as everyone's build becomes helpful to someone else.
  10. Arthur, just a possible solution, use Elmer’s Pro Bond Wood Filer, redrilll the hole and cover the patch with the coiled rope. I think you will find the wood filler does a pretty good job matching the unpainted wood.
  11. Rigging underway- chainplates, deadeyes and shrouds. I used the Kit supplied black rope to string the deadeyes but went with a smaller non-kit tan shroud rope. I installed the modified chainplates along with the home constructed hooks and stropped deadeyes. The deadeyes were strung off the boat, as shown below, and then moved into place. Next, the backstays were strung. All this went without much difficulty. Finally, I installed the bowsprit brace and post. I decided to install the bowsprit post in the center of the forward thwart as was done for the Medway version. I was concerned about making a rectangular hole in the deck as it was to be located under the thwart. As it turned out it was a piece of cake. I drilled a 1/16” hole through the thwart down into the deck. Next the hole in the thwart was shaped and the post inserted. I pushed a bit on the post to mark its shape and to my surprise it popped through the deck. Viola! Easy peasy!
  12. Arthur, La Chaloupe Armée / 42ft Armed Longboat of 1834 by tkay11 – scale 1:36 - plans by M. Delacroix has thwart posts. Apparently this was a documented boat. Anyway, I don’t think they’re probably necessary. The matte spray is shown below. It seems to work well.
  13. Nice mod you have going. I will be following you progress as I am watching how it works out.
  14. Arthur, it looks like you are really putting in the hours and making some cool modifications. I like your thimbles very much. I have not decided what to do in this regard yet. I may give it a try but I will see - not there yet. About the belaying pins, they should be rather easy to carve from square basswood rod. When I made the thwart seat posts, to my suprise, I found it rather easy to care and shape round posts. You may have skipped that step. BTW, I was reading the supply list in the manual the other day and found a can of Matte Finish Spray listed. I did a search of the instruction manual and found no reference to its use. I thought about it and decided it would actually be good to spray painted surface, like the mast, etc., with it as they tend to scratch easily, e.g., when slipping on the collars and such. I tried it out today and it does prevent scratching and it also takes out the sheen of the paint and gives it, in my opinion, a better look.
  15. Do it Arthur. It took about 2.5 hours at most. If you don’t you’ll wished you had later. Now is the time. Carve the front one before you take anything off and then you can decide from there.
  16. Before proceeding to the rigging, I decided to redo the canon mounts. I cut them from 3/8” dowel. The stem starboard gun mount was carved to fit between the bow Thwart and G bulkhead/frame, then come up inside and over the cap rail.
  17. In the reading I have done, many of the Longboats or launched in the early 1800’s were converted or built as armed. I would not be surprised if some of the boats did not have bowsprit backstays. When sails were up as for rescue boats, there would be strong upward forces needing a counter force. As as far as the x2 enlargement, I think you are correct. Obviously, some mods were needed for their concept of arming the boat.
  18. Thanks all for the comments. I don’t think Arthur and I are in a mad dash to finish rather we want to do the best we can. Actually I find it interesting and fun to make modifications to the kit plans. Both of us have been in a discovery mode and we hope it will give others ideas and help as they work on their builds.
  19. I have adopted Arthur’s approach to chainplates and deadeye strops as we are both on an approach of modifying our boats using Chuck’s design. I tried forming strops from small brass rods but found it difficult to create the small curves. I experimented with various wire and decided copper would work well. I settled on 20 gauge thermostat wire. I used small round nosed jewelry pliers to form the bends and curves. In order to create a black color, I used Brass Black Metal Finish on the copper parts. Holes were drilled in the deadeyes to receive the eyebolts. The bands and hooks were glued with thin CA. I would refer readers to Arthur’s fine detailed description, but basically there are four parts: modified kit chainplates, strop rings or bands, strop eyebolts and strop-chainplate hooks. In the first photograph below, the parts are shown with the strop bands appearing as unbent straight wires. Finished assemblies -
  20. I remember the mention about the cap rail width problem, but it would require either removing and replacing or shaving off some from the outside. The inside is somewhat fixed because of the frames so only the outside can be reduced. I am not sure I want to tackle this as if I mess up, I would probably scrap the build and start over with Chuck’s or something else. At this point I think I will probably have fun and finish it. There was also mention that the boat boat was too narrow for a gunboat.
  21. Arthur, great look for the strops and hooks. Right now I am not doing too well getting something looking even a fraction as good as yours. The hole idea may be the key. I have been trying to make a one piece strop-hook combination. Trying to bend a hook on it is a real problem. Thanks for sharing your post on this.
  22. Arthur, I have not looked at the bowsprit Traveler at all other to make sure it fit and slid. Can the rigging be made to reflect reality? With regards to your rigging, what size are you considering? Chuck on his rigging plan uses 0.45 mm and 0.63 mm. I have some of both and some other sizes leftover from my Cutty Sark build. Also, are you using wire or brass for your strops? I tried using 1/32” brass rod but it is way too hard to shape and also I think it looks too large. I think 20 gauge wire might be the ticket.
  23. I think Chuck is happy when boats are improved in any way. I have slowed way down as I ponder what I am going to do next.
  24. Working on rigging but undecided as what to do with the chainplates and strops. I am looking at various options which also includes those offered in the kit.

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