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Egilman

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About Egilman

  • Birthday 07/11/1957

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    The Great Pacific NW
  • Interests
    Computing, Historical Research, Model Building

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  1. For a 1940's Garage the Ford is perfect!!! The Packard would be out of date and therefore an anachronism.... By 1928, pretty much all solid rubber tyres were gone, pnuematic, tubeless tires had taken over in production.... Although you would still see tubed bias ply tires, all manufacturers were mounting radial ply tires by the late '30's... That Truck reminds me of the Walton's truck from the TV series..... Very appropriate for a 1940's garage...
  2. My sincere apologies, I do sometimes drop into a few rabbit holes.... (but that is a big part of my modeling, history, and all the connections between sometimes very disparate things)
  3. Very good Andy I think you got them all.... Shame they don't have a Ford & Sons Model F there...... Fordson's (British name) don't get a lot of interest from the tractor collecting crowd and to be honest I don't understand why.... They were the Model "T" of the tractor world, hundreds of thousands of them being made in the US and Britain, (1917-64) It pioneered the frameless design used by most of the above.... The gentleman across the road from me has a running 9N on display.... They Then became the Ford-Ferguson, for the inventor of the revolutionary three point floating hitch, contracted to Fordson... Ferguson split with Ford and sold his own version, then was bought up by Massey to become Massey-Ferguson. today one of the biggest names in tractors in the world today..... Henry Ford contributed much much more to the world than just affordable cars... Kingsford charcoal briquets is another name not associated with Henry Ford... The company, Ford Charcoal was created by Henry to make a product out of all the wood waste his auto plants were producing.. Along with it, the town of Kingsford, Michigan which formed around his original charcoal plant.... It was renamed Kingsford charcoal in 1951 when the charcoal plant was divested by Ford corporation. named in honor of Edward G. Kingsford, Ford's Real estate and timber agent and the first manager of the charcoal plant.... But I digress, sorry....
  4. Option "C" would not give you a complete aircraft, you would lose the 12 to 18 inches the exhaust extends out the tail of the fuselage..... Easy to overcome though, scratch build a replacement exhaust tube.... An engine stand is a simple affair as the engine mounts are on the sides and a block rest supports the aft portion of the engine.... Plenty of pics on the net of the basic engine stand for a Klimov VK-1 engine.... It's probably the easiest way to display both.....
  5. It is know in the jewelry making world as a Dapping set.... Amazon..... Harborfreight... In the $45 to $50.00 range. Mine, (Harborfreight) works like a charm not only to shape paper, but light plastics as well...
  6. I guess it isn't carried in all of them, it is in the two HL's closest to me though, Formula 560, $4.29 a bottle... They also sell Evergreen's Canopy Glue and Testors clear parts cement.... I don't know why their website doesn't show it.... (but it wouldn't be the first time the store has something and the website doesn't) Yeah they do have a very limited supply of specific modeling supplies, but they do carry more than the usual craft and department stores.... Definitely an example of what online shopping has done to the hobby....
  7. The B-24 was Jimmy Stewarts favorite aircraft, he flew over 30 missions in one over Germany.... He preferred it over the B-17.... Looking good brother... you do make old kits come to life...
  8. That's actually the current scientific thought on how they stood rather than the "erect" stance, (tail dragging the ground) they used to put them in..... The way they do it in the museum is to built a steel skeleton out of tube and bar stock and install the bones along the bars, one must remember they are petrified bone, with the weight of stone..... It has to be a pretty strongly engineered framework to hold that much tonnage of stone bones..... The one in your pic OC is in a walking stance, Most in museums are erected this way now and yes they walked on their toes, the long tail served to balance the weight of the head and neck..... If I had pulled the trigger on it I would have planned a stiff wire skeleton to mount the bones onto just the same way the museums do it in actual practice.... Then you could pose it anyway you like and it wouldn't be too delicate..... Another interesting project.... At 3 foot long it will be impressive....
  9. Hey we have a timber framer in the fold.... {chuckle} Nice work, the interior shot looks real.... Beautiful job.....
  10. Actually it's the engine crank/rods combinations you have backwards.... Longer rods in a given displacement gives more torque, shorter rods give more RPM.... More torque, equals quicker takeoff... More RPM equals greater sustained speed.... The art of it is in combining the two in a happy balance.... We used to stroke 350's with 400 rods and an overbore to get 383 strokers.... Ran them in street modifieds... Those were the days....
  11. I think it looks the part of a SCW tank very very well.... Yes in constant usage the tracks would basically be bare steel on the contact surfaces, but this wasn't a tank in constant usage, it had long periods of sitting out in the semi humid spanish countryside environment... in essence everything not painted would have surface rust over it in a very short time, so I little shiny where the rust was knocked off would fit it perfectly... A little rust around the lower parts would also fit as I'm sure they didn't exactly receive the maintenance they would have when in the French army... I think you understood the subject well and interpreted it appropriately.... Looks very very good.. Well done...
  12. Yeah, they were giant spikes, 3-5" long.... for ripping and tearing......
  13. I checked Micro Mark as well and almost dropped the hammer on it myself....
  14. Yep that's one theory being promulgated today, one of many... But back then it was the industrial era and more efficiency meant bigger yields and more profits.... Not saying either point of view is correct, but quantity over quality is always more profitable.... (and very subjective)
  15. Andy, it seems labor intensive until you remember what they were replacing.... A man with a horse and a single cutting plow.... That rig could do in 5 minutes what it would take a standard plow 30-60 minutes.... The Nuffield and Fordson tractors are showing why they were a revolution in farming, with a dual blade plow, (and the Fordson three point floating hitch) they could do in 5 minutes what the Fowler rig took 10, without the setup, and do it with only one man instead of a minimum of 6....
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