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Medway Longboat 1742 by Doug McKenzie


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This first post I'll mention some of the skills that I am hoping to hone:

1--  Fairing the frames - I would like to have more of a process to follow whereas I currently just sort of gently attack the frames - this is particularly true for the inside faces of the frames.

2--  Planking - Making a nice fit between the edges of adjacent planks.

3--  Painting - I have only once painted a model ship (Emma C Berry for sailing).  The finish that I obtained was crude to say the least.

4-- Others - I'm sure there are skills that I don't even anticipate needing now.

 

The photo shows current status - frames are being faired

 

BTW this kit is great!  Pieces are well designed and manufactured at least up to where I am now.  The inclusion of the building board is much appreciated.

 

Doug

 

Barge fairiing.jpg

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Chuck S,

 

Anyway, I wasn't trying.  I am at a fascinating point with brigantine Leon because of the documents that have been found from her time of build, 1880.  I figured I'd better set aside structured time for the longboat or she'd be forgotten.  

 

Good fortune to all,

 

Doug

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  • 3 weeks later...

The beveling of the frames is complete and was almost painless due to Ryland Craze's suggestion (in our email thread) to use nail files.  I ended up with a set of emery boards that went from 80 to 3000.  Similar to Ryland I used 180 almost exclusively.  At first, I used a longitudinal motion using the bendability of the emery boards to advantage but I found that cumbersome so I made a change.  I cut the emery board in half yielding 3 1/4" long pieces.  Then I laid the short piece down (longitudinally) on the frame I was beveling and on an adjacent frame.  I applied pressure to the frame I was beveling so the adjacent frame was only a guide.  I rubbed along the frame's edge rather than moving longitudinally.  I tried to leave a strip of the laser cut brown of about 25% of the thickness of the frame to avoid beveling too much.  I think I may be trusting the accuracy of the kit by not beveling completely but it was a judgement call since the technology of the kit seems to be fantastic.  I put extra effort into making sure each frame was centered when I glued them to the keel to further reduce this potential problem.  Only after planking will I really know if this was OK.

finished beveling.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

It turns out that what I thought was enuff fairing of the frames wasn't.  So after cleaning that up I went to plank layout.  I tried three different tapes to connect the dots and just couldn't make it work - I felt like my fingers were too big and kept getting in the way.  So I decided to use wood battens.  I had some 1/32" x 1/16" pieces and drilled holes for pins and then I was able to connect the dots and extend to the stem and stern post/transom.  I only used these battens on every other plank.  My endpoints were pretty different from Chuck's but, of course, it made sense to use his marks since I'll be using his planks!

1740870282_tapestern.thumb.jpg.5054ddde51845c1e9426398a49c20ea0.jpg1335142896_tapebow.thumb.jpg.e4fed4be7acad98d870f6126d62aad5d.jpg

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  • 6 months later...
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