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Thanks Ed for posting all the addendums here, I will copy and add to my plans and documentation in the two volumns. 

 

Now all I have to do is check back once in a while.

 

Guy

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Ed,

I have found a reference to Steel and wanted to check with you. They are listed as,

 

The Elements and Practice of Rigging, Seamanship, and Naval Tactics (Cambridge Library Collection - Naval and Military History) (Volume 1)

 

The Elements and Practice of Rigging, Seamanship, and Naval Tactics (Cambridge Library Collection - Naval and Military History) (Volume 2)

 

The Elements and Practice of Rigging, Seamanship, and Naval Tactics (Cambridge Library Collection - Naval and Military History) (Volume 3)

 

Are these the ones to which you are referring? All three?

 

Thanks,

Richard

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Richard

 

The work by Steel that I have listed in the bibliographies of Volumes I and II, is Steel's Naval Architecture, not his work on masting and rigging.  I may have listed Masting and Rigging, but the work I generally refer to is Naval Architecture.

 

Ed

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Aha,

looked it up. That will be a little pricey for me.

I am looking into the other volumes you have listed.

I appreciate your help

Richard

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Richard,

 

I would suggest getting a copy of Steel's Vade Mecum for the Shipbuilder. It has much of the same information and is very useful. The tables of scantlings do not include as many classes of ships, but are otherwise very complete. If your class of ship is not listed you might try getting a copy of a contract for the ship or the class from the National Maritime Museum in London.

 

The Vade Mecum can be downloaded free t:

 

http://books.google.com/books/about/The_shipwright_s_vade_mecum_by_D_Steel.html?id=pjcDAAAAQAAJ

 

I wish I could tell you how to navigate to Ships Contracts at the NMM website, but although I have succeeded in doing it, a least once, I cannot repeat the process. Perhaps someone out there can describe how to do it.

 

Ed

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I had a question today asking whether metric dimensions were included on the drawings in the books. All of the dimensions on the drawings and details sheets are actual real world dimensions - that is, the dimensions of the actual ship. As with the original English ship, all are in feet and inches. I have not reduced those to model size on any of the drawings. In the books, I recommend taking larger dimensions directly from the drawings with calipers or dividers. For smaller dimensions like scantlings or for smaller assemblies and parts like the capstan, jeer bits, etc. I recommend using a conversion table then using digital calipers, micrometer or sometimes a decimal ruler to size the model parts. A 1:60 conversion chart is included on the CD that shows conversions from actual inches to 1:60 inches for dimensions up to 72 actual inches.

 

The drawings in the book for tools and fixtures have inch dimensions, however most of these are 1:1 scale, so sizes can be measured directly.

 

To assist those with metric measuring tools, I am attaching a metric version of the 1:60 conversion chart in pdf form.

 

1to60 Inch to mm Conversions.pdf

 

Ed

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Ed, I fully understand the uneasiness of us continental Europeans when it comes to inches. I would however strongly recommend to all Naiad's prospective modelers to use the conversion chart that has come with your book. Inches cannot really be converted into mm that can actually and reasonably be measured. 1 quarter is 6,3 mm and something and it is that something that creates the problem. I am building the Naiad using the original chart and one of those inexpensive digital calipers that can read up to millesimal inches and convert them into millimiters, if you wish to do so. So far, at least as regards measurements, I have not come across any real difficulties and I am even getting somewhat used to inches ...

Warm season greetings to everybody

Salvatore

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Thanks for this comment Salvatore.  It reinforces my own view.  Digital calipers are the answer for small measurements of precise dimensions and most calipers available today support inches or metric.  For larger dimensions, fractions of mm are less important so a metric ruler or an inch ruler graduated in tenths does the job with either the conversion chart or a simple calculation.

 

Feet-inches-fractions  conversions can be a bother and I actually started  putting decimal inches on all the drawings for easier digital conversion, but that still leaves the feet-inch issue.  I did not want to put all the dimensions, especially the large one in just decimal inches.

 

In the end, no matter what system, there is still some conversion to be done and after doing it a few times it becomes second nature.

 

Ed

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Ed, I am proceeding with the building and I have found some minor mistakes in the drawings you might perhaps wish to fix. In particular, the bevels of some aft cant frames  seem to be wrong: 27a, 7.4 deg. should be 5.4 deg. - 26.a, 4.6 deg. should probably be 3.6 and 25.f, 1.1 deg. should be 3.1. There might be others, but these are the only ones that at first glance I have detected.

Very best season greetings

Salvatore

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Salvatore,

 

Thanks for your note. I checked all three of the angles you mentioned on the original CAD worksheets and all three appear to be correct. I also checked the three frames using a protractor on drawing 2 and that also showed the angles to be correct. Please tell me the method you are using to measure the angles. That may help me understand the differences you are getting.

 

I will describe how these angles were determined. Each cant frame is shown in plan as a CAD object on Drawing 2. Each of these objects has properties that describe key parameters. One of these is the angle of the object,in this case the angle of the cant frame to the side of the deadwood. I used those angles to calculate the bevel angles for the patterns. These angles should be very accurate and in fact I found this to be so when using them to build the model.

 

Cheers,

 

Ed

Edited by EdT

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Ed, I am so sorry. I should have known better than bother you with bevels and angles at Christmas time! I will come to that again at a more appropriate time.

Merry Christmas

Salvatore

P.S. I am about to leave for NYC where I will at last put my hands on my two copies of Volume II.

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Not a problem, Salvatore - and thank you for he holiday greeting. I am always interested in comments on the book and addressin any issues wit the content. I will await your answer. Have a safe trip.

 

Ed

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The Naiad Frigate - Addendum 4

 

There is a discrepancy between the configuration of Frame OA as shown on the original Naiad draft and the way it is shown on Drawing 3 and on the pattern on the CD.   Frame OA is shown butted against frame OF over its full height.  In fact the upper futtocks of Frame OA should be set 2" aft of the joint line. 

 

Attached is a revised pdf for the OA pattern and another showing the correct configuration for frame O on Drawing 3.

 

Thank you, Albert, for pointing out this difference.

 

Ed

03 Naiad 60 Hull Framing Elevation Frame O.pdf

Naiad 60 Pattern OA.pdf

Edited by EdT

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Ed,

I just received my Naiad book one. Great piece of work. I will be going through it in detail before beginning my build. I Still have to decide if I will buy a precut lumber package or invest in a table saw and go whole hog on the project. So, it will take me time before I am ready to start it but there are some tools and such that I will start building in the near future.

 

I would like to ask if you can set up one message, perhaps at the beginning of this thread that would be an edited collection of updates so they would be all in one place and current. This one message could be continually updated with any corrections, while new, regular messages could continue to discuss them which would provide a prompt / message for those of us following the thread.

Summarizing them as a collection in one place would, at least for me, make it easier to keep track of them.

 

Wishing you a happy, healthy new year.

Richard

Edited by rtropp

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Thank you, Richard. I will give some thought to your request. The disadvantage of adding updates as edits to a single post is that there would be no email notifications of the changes. The advantage of posting as separate posts is that everyone gets notified. Perhaps there is another way.

 

Ed

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Naiad Frigate Volume I Addenda

Attached is a pdf of the compiled Addenda 1 to 4, including the revised patterns etc. as required. Some of this includes corrections and some of the information is additional and may be useful.  As additions are needed, I will update this document and post it so that all addenda will be available in one posting.

Vol 1 Addenda.pdf

Ed

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Hello Ed, are Lino, are you okay? Saturday, January 18th at Ascoli go to a flea market and I salute your native country. I started to build Najade but I have a question on a piece of drawing Stem Apron Patterns Starboard, that snaps over the keel. There he speaks of three measures: Lower Apron 20 "wide, will side to 18.5" after fairing sided 14.5 "above bearding line. Instead from the pictures I think I see a whole extent, in other photos I seem to see a board, you may spegarmi? Thanks

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Ciao Lino.  I am doing very well, thank you and I hope you are enjoying the new year.  Have a glass of vino rosso for me in Ascoli.

 

Now for your question.  I am sorry if the note on the drawing is unclear.  What it means:  Make the lower apron from a piece 20" wide.  This allows some excess so it can be finished to a width of 18 1/2" when it is faired.  There is a ledge at the bearding line to rest the cant frames.  This ledge is 2" on each side so that the lower apron above the line should be 14 1/2" wide (18 1/2 - 2 - 2 = 14 1/2).  This is the width of the deadwood. 

 

Figure 8-12 on page 69 shows the lower apron assembled to the deadwood being glued to the keel.  The area above the bearding line has been trimmed back to the width of the deadwood.  The area below the bearding line is left at 20" until later when it is faired. 

 

Let me know if this is not clear.

 

I would love to see some pictures of your work.

 

Ed

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Hello Ed, thanks for your kind response, in fact, is how I understood but I was not sure, now I am clear. As for the red wine, if you give me the address I'll send you a good RED Piceno, Regarding some photos of my work on Najade, I just started working on the keel, when it is ready I will send you some photos with pleasure, greetings, Lino.

Edited by pfranco

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Hi Ed,

Amazing book to find, read and follow as I now venture beyond the kits to scratch building!  Naturally I am taking my time and finding the right place in my brain for each step--so much to learn and a very positive challenge.

 

Rather than use the one and only page 3B to attach to the base of my recently completed building board, etc., I had an exact copy made at a blueprint shop, copied onto clear mylar.  I decided that I want to get some other working sheets copied the same way for board/wall mount for easy measuring as you suggest--I don't want to use/mess up the original drawing from the books (I have both volumes).  The copy place missed the copyright on the original page for my 3B but said I couldn't get any others copied without a release from you.  So my question is, how do I arrange to get such permission while protecting the copyright laws?

 

Gary

(near San Diego, CA)

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Gary, I appreciate your purchase of the books and your plan to build a Naiad model.  I am also flattered that you would want to maintain a “pristine” copy of the material.  I have given some thought to your request, and since others may have similar desires, I would like to answer with some explanation.

 

Like many who contribute to MSW, I have a pretty strong interest in freely supporting the craft of model shipbuilding and ship modelers.  I hope this is evident from my other postings on this site and especially in the authorship of the two Naiad books.  Books of this type that serve a very small market are very far from being profit-making propositions.  Books like Naiad, Euryalus and others, that include drawings and other media attachments are expensive to create and produce.  They cannot be priced based on their true cost.  Publication would not be possible without authors working essentially for free – plus bearing the costs of producing the materials – cameras, software, computer supplies and the like.  I am sure you know that many books, including some mass market books, do not include drawings and some sell these separately – at prices well above the cost of books.  For these reasons, Seawatch books like Naiad, if I may say so, are an extraordinary bargain.  They will, in fact, turn out to be a minor cost in the overall model project. 

 

Given all this, I do not feel it is appropriate for me to provide release to any copyright restrictions.  I would hope that copy services and fellow modelers that purchase these and other books would appreciate and honor the copyrights.  It seems a small thing to ask.

 

I would be remiss if I were not to acknowledge the contribution of Seawatch books in this note.  The service these books provide to model shipbuilding is enormous and involves substantial commitment and work.  For the reasons cited above the financial gains are small.  Bob and Cathy deserve our thanks and support.

 

This does not solve your problem.  I can offer some suggestions. 

 

One option is to put the cost of copying drawings toward purchase of a second book.  I know of modelers who have purchased second books to retain as “library” copies, using a separate copy in the workshop.  This is one option. 

 

Another less expensive approach is to provide for drawing protection in the workshop.  I found that attaching drawings to plywood sheets that hang from the wall allow easy taking of measurements and minimum damage to the drawings.  If you wish to use drawings on the workbench, as I often do, I would suggest covering them with a sheet of thin clear plastic. 

 

Also, you willl note that drawing 2B, which is virtually identical to Drawing 2, was an extra provided as a base board drawing to preserve drawing 2.

 

Others may offer good suggestions as well.

 

Thank you again for your interest in Naiad and the books.

 

Ed

Edited by EdT

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As far as I understand it all the drawings are based on CAD originals. In which case why not charge a fair price to issue reprints of the drawings separately, either as a package or individually? Builders could request them to be supplied at particular scales, not just the one chosen for the book. For a higher price you could provide PDFs which the builder could print themselves, either in whole or in part, again to whatever scale suited them.

 

I can see why you want to protect your copyright, but the sad truth is that anybody who wants to can ignore it with impunity. What's more I would suspect many people needing to make copies of your work to be able to build a model will already have bought your book - haven't you therefore already been paid for your intellectual effort?

 

My copy of the Delacroix monograph on the Chaloupe Armee en Guerre from Ancre specifically suggests copying the plans to help with the construction of the model.

 

Best wishes

 

Rob

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When the plans for Euryalus first came out, I was asked privately if I would supply a set of plans on large sheets, rolled and not folded.  I was happy to do so.  But by the time I had the plans printed, the mailing tube purchased, the postage paid (and not to mention the time, travel, etc. involved), I had almost as much invested in the new set of plans as the cost of buying another book!  I was happy to supply the plans gratis, but at the same time I cannot afford to do so in general.  No one who produces one of these works does so for the money, but there are others who rely in some way upon the ongoing sale of the books (i.e., the publisher who fronts all the development funding and takes all the financial risk).  I can also say that if one divides the amount of money received from the sale of the books and plans by the number of hours worked the outcome is something under slave wages.  

 

I think Ed has given a good review of the question and has offered two reasonable solutions.  

 

Wayne

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Thanks for the thoughtful reply, Ed.  I certainly see your point in the bigger picture.  I am spending x times the cost of the book on other materials, mostly wood and upgrading my tools because it is an exciting project for me, so I can probably add the cost of another book (or extra set of drawings as suggested by Decoyman if they were to become available) if I damage any of the drawings I now have.  I will certainly do what I can to protect them, but years of living with the effects of Murphy's Law caused me to look at preparing for potential disaster.

 

Now I will get back to laying the keel!  Thanks again; I'm sure I will have many questions of you and others as I get into this.

 

Gary

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Rob, thank you for your input.  Can I assume you have purchased the book and are familiar with the extent of the drawings and supplementary CD contents?  I think you would find it more than adequate to build the model without having to make copies of the large drawings.  If you have not bought the book, I would be glad to enumerate the contents of the CD that is provided in addition to the 15 large drawings.  Multiple prints of the extensive CD content can of course be made.

 

I fully understand and accept that I cannot control copying of the book contents.  Judgements on that are in the hands of purchasers.

 

I am not in the business of selling drawings.  If I were, they would not have been included in the book and would have sold separately at several multiples of the book price in order to make any profit.

 

Ed

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Thanks for your understanding, Gary.  I look forward to your questions and progress.  I suggest a build log.

 

Ed

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