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What kind of hinge would have been used n an 18 century door? I replaced the white metal door on  my Enterprise and got to thinking the other night, a door needs a handle and some hinges. I based the door on the kit part and left the "casing" proud like a modern door. Making the knob was easy enough, but I am not sure what the hinges should look like. I have looked through Antscherl's "Fully framed series I and II as well as Lavery's "arming and Fitting" They made no mention of door hinges that I could find. I even looked through the three how too books I have and found nothing.  Lots of information on gun port hinges and rudder hinges but nothing about door hinges.

 

I am tempted to just cut three bits of brass wire and blacken them to represent the hinge barrel. Then I saw on another build a mention of "L" hinges. This sounds correct for what I am trying to do but the only thing I found online was this reproduction hinge :

 

http://www.houseofantiquehardware.com/surface-mounted-hinges-forged-iron?utm_source=froog&utm_medium=cse-nc&utm_campaign=gdf&partner=froog&gdftrk=gdfV22090_a_7c472_a_7c4382_a_7cR_d_08AH_d_AH3BQ&gclid=CLPKp5uuvrgCFe1_QgodSScA_Q  

 

That hinge is designed to mount to the face of the door and the case, my case is proud by about a 64th".  I am thinking of making the "L" portion and soldering it to some wire but I wanted to get some input from some more experienced people. I am not sure if the arm of the hinge should span just the stile or al the way on to the the rails also.

 

 

 

post-326-0-39727400-1374335545_thumb.jpg

 

Sam

 

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If it did open inward, runner 63 is correct. However, weather deck doors open outward: think of a heavy sea breaking over the deck. The water pressure would blow an inward opening door open. In the 18th century 'T' style hinges were most often used.

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the " T " hinges are actually called strap hinges and were commonly used on doors in the 18th c. longer straps were used on gate and barn doors. the " HL " hinges were used much earlier and designed during the crusades. the HL was designed to signify " holy land" .

and yes, the door should swing outward. besides the chance of it blowing in, it would also be cramped to open inward.

if you would like to research the hinges further, talk with an accomplished blacksmith. i build colonial reproduction furniture and have a blacksmith hand forge the hinges for me. if there are none in your area, there are many online

let me know if you need help. id love to contribute.

scott

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thanks druxey. its amazing the stuff you can learn when you want to, useless as it may be.

 

allanyed , you know, your explanation is probably just as correct as mine. without us being there, we will never truly know!

 

and finally, antony, you aren't hijacking anything!  im glad you have access to sites I don't and im really interested in researching it. thank  you for sharing that

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Thanks everybody. I too love the "useless" trivia that comes up here and elsewhere. I hadnt heard of the HL hinge before, should have installed some of those when I was with my ex.......

Religion comes up in a lot of period construction, a very common common door style, at least herre in the States is something called "Bible and Cross" I learned it as "Book and Cross"

It looks like sometime this week I will have to see if I can file a couple of brass strips into the right shape and make a couple of hinges.

Sam

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Scott, good information on the blacksmith, who knows, you may hear from me one day in the future. Where I work we build theme park attractions and every once in a while run into something we cant fabricate in-house.

Sam

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Mark, black foil.... Theatrical supply places sell a foil that is black, its used for blocking light and probably a whole lot more. I dont recall how think it is, have to look and see if we still have any at work. Hadnt thought about pounding it thinner either, thanks

sam

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