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HMS Triton 1773. POF. 1:48. Daniel


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225 replies to this topic

#21
Boccherini

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Daniel,

I only just noticed this build log. Looks like you'have made a good start. Interesting stern jig, on the inside of the frames instead of the outside. Any particular reason for this? Seems to have worked out for you.

 

Regards,

Grant.



#22
harvey1847

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Thank you all for answering! Three replies in day is World record in my log...

 

Thanks rocker for the advice. I did just to try and it will not happen again. I hold the piece using my finger nails, actually I look like a guitar player. They are quite helpful.

 

Pete I am not going to simulate the caulking. I´ll do it with the deck planking only. I don´t like the caulking stuff. I hope that with the finish with wax or tung oil (not decide yet) all the lines will come out. The joints are there!

 

Grant, The stern jig was a copy of the John´s and Bublehead logs from MSW 1.0. I separated the top of the upper jig 17.9cm. Jonh separated 16.5cm. If I have had to do it again I would use the three of them not just the upper one.

 

Back to the workshop! (my living room)

 

Thanks!

 

Daniel.

 

info about treenailing (copied from the Matrim´s notes)

1/48 scale Frames, no 61 bit (.039", 1mm), hull planking, no 76 bit (.020" .5mm), deck beams, knees, bitts, etc, no 68 bit (.031" .8mm), and for securing the frames and the keelson, a no 52 bit (.0625" 1.5mm) will do fine.


Edited by harvey1847, 15 March 2013 - 08:50 AM.


#23
harvey1847

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And the thing is completed!! HU HA! (Chimo Bayo)

 

Attached File  DSC05742.JPG   115.34KB   13 downloads

 

Using a piece of glass has been very useful to ensure the whole piece is flat. I took it from a trash bin on the street. It´s amazing what we trash. I guess is this market economy we all live in. I did my way. (Frank Sinatra)

 

I have glued first all the #3 chocks, then I glued the #2 mainpiece to the #5 bobstay, then #1 + #1 gripes and then the whole thing. I have to repeat the #4 piece. Do not Know why but it does not fit. More scrap pieces!!

 

 

Attached File  Stem_RS_PS.jpg   290.76KB   13 downloads

 

 

                                                  

 

Good Night!

 

 

Daniel.


Edited by harvey1847, 15 March 2013 - 08:46 AM.

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#24
mtaylor

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Nice job, Daniel.  Rest well, you deserve it.


Mark

"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me


Current Build:

Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0

Past Builds:
Triton Cross-Section
USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War (Gallery) Build Log
Wasa (Gallery)


Member of the Nautical Research Guild


#25
AnobiumPunctatum

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Nice knee of the head. If I have to make such small pieces like the chock, I use a slightly bigger piece and cut only the first two or three sides to the correct size.

On the other side I let allways enough material for safe working. After glueing together I cut the last sides to the correct size.


Regards Christian
 

In the shipyard: HM Sloop Fly, 1776 - Scale 1/32;

On the drawing board: Naval Cutter Rattlesnake, 1777 - Scale 1/32


#26
harvey1847

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Hello all!

 

Here´s where I am on right now. In order to lay all the frames I have so far, I need to do the keel. Here are the pieces marked with pencil.

Attached File  keel 2345.JPG   136.19KB   3 downloads

 

It has reminded me someway the work I did back in 2011 with the pillars and the joist in my house. It´s amazing how things changed working from 1:1 to 1:48.

 

Attached File  20_20_450cm pillars.JPG   175.52KB   4 downloads

 

 

 

 

Good Weekend!

 

 

Daniel.


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#27
Pete38

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Nice layout for the keel.

 

Interesting on the joist for your house. Were those hand hewed? Looks like a big job. :)

 

Looking forward to more on your full build.


Triton Cross Section 1:32

 

SEE YA LATER

 

im-outta-here-bye-bye-smiley-emoticon.gi

 


#28
Old Sea Dog

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looking good very nice work


Dave

 

No problem can be solved from the level of consciousness that created it.  Albert Einstein


#29
harvey1847

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Hello All!

 

Small progress has been done during this week. Lots of party days, Saint Joseph, Saint Patrick and now the Easter ahead. To much kids arround and too less time to enjoy the hobby.

 

Anyway, I´ve completed the apron. First I cut the pieces as always from 8mm thick cherry timber. I´m using only cherry for the frames, keel, stern and stem. I´ll use some more wood but from time to time.

 

Attached File  apron_02.jpg   338.01KB   0 downloads

 

Here is the order I followed gluing the different pieces. I have used again a glass surface to ensure the flatness of the pieces.

 

Attached File  apron_01.jpg   129.47KB   2 downloads

 

Here is the result. I´m nut ungluing the paper patterns by the moment. In the other side I will use tracing paper again as I did cutting the steps on the stern. (See post # 3)

 

Attached File  apron_03.jpg   442.83KB   6 downloads

 

Here is all the set. I have to fair a lot the whole thing. I am quite scared about how to sand the bow and the damn rabbet. How I miss the "Stickies" posts that used to be in the old MSW 1.0 snif snif...

 

Attached File  apron_04.jpg   491.62KB   4 downloads

 

Best wishes to all and Happy Easter!

 

 

Daniel.


Edited by harvey1847, 23 March 2013 - 08:07 AM.

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#30
the learner

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Thank you for reposting your work


Cheers, Guy
The Learner
Current Member NRG,SMA

 

Current Build: HMS Triton 1:48 on line

 

 

 


#31
Pete38

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Very nice work. Looks great


Triton Cross Section 1:32

 

SEE YA LATER

 

im-outta-here-bye-bye-smiley-emoticon.gi

 


#32
harvey1847

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Hello all, lots of things arround have push me out a little bit from the hobby but we are all back an safe.

 

I have inaugurate my new workshop. No more dust in the living room! My wife is quite happy now, my kids kind of sad...They love all the machines and the sound of them. Anyway Here´s where I am at.

 

After marked the cuts on the keel pieces I started to make the scarfs. The best results were with the firs picture.

 

Attached File  DSC05790.JPG   144.11KB   2 downloads  Attached File  DSC05796.JPG   146.76KB   4 downloads

 

I had lots of fun chiseling out the wood from piece #5.

 

Attached File  DSC05784.JPG   59.65KB   3 downloadsAttached File  DSC05785.JPG   59.46KB   4 downloads

 

I thought that was to be quite difficult to make but with patience it came out quite nice. Here´s the result.

 

Attached File  DSC05788.JPG   76.9KB   3 downloads

 

I did not start from a square timber. I cut the different pieces from timber using the scroll saw. There´s small diferents between the pieces so I do not Know if I´ll have to re-do the whole thing. We´ll see.

 

Pete, here is a pic of the tool I used for the joist. Mine is other brand but yes is a hand hewed. Excellent tool.

 

Attached File  azuela.jpg   91.07KB   2 downloads

 

Hope to post more in a while...

 

 

Daniel.

 

 

 

 

 


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#33
AnobiumPunctatum

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Daniel your chock is looking very nice.

 

If you don't have a mill think of the solution I used for my HMS Fly. I made the first part of the keel and the lower stem from two parts which are half thick than the keel. So you can make the chock very accurate with less effort. Noone will see ths trick later.

 

Be careful with positioning the lower stem. This is a very tricky part, to get the right anglebetween the keel and the stem.


Regards Christian
 

In the shipyard: HM Sloop Fly, 1776 - Scale 1/32;

On the drawing board: Naval Cutter Rattlesnake, 1777 - Scale 1/32


#34
the learner

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Is there enough mill work on this build to justify the cost of the purchase or practice makes perfect!


Cheers, Guy
The Learner
Current Member NRG,SMA

 

Current Build: HMS Triton 1:48 on line

 

 

 


#35
AnobiumPunctatum

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There are two parts where a mill is very helpful, the lower apron and the after deadwood. You can do also both parts without a mill. Bob has shown a way to build these parts with 3 layers of timber. I tried his method for my Swan class build last year and it worked very well. Have a look at Modellmarine.de to get a first impression. If it's helpful I will translate the text.

 

A mill is a good invest for a scratch build modeler because it makes life much easier but not really necessary. >ou can build models also without a mill.


Edited by AnobiumPunctatum, 03 April 2013 - 11:40 AM.

Regards Christian
 

In the shipyard: HM Sloop Fly, 1776 - Scale 1/32;

On the drawing board: Naval Cutter Rattlesnake, 1777 - Scale 1/32


#36
harvey1847

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Thanks all, learner and Christian. I´ll have to wait for the mill, no money by the moment... but it has been in my mental list for a lot of time (the mill) the sarfs and everything would be easier. I agree. Thanks for the info anyway. I do apreciate the link,.

 

I´ll stick by the moment to use the what I have. Maybe I´ll buy a hand press drill. Do not Know now.

 

Regards.

 

 

Daniel.



#37
Randy

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Daniel,  A good looking scarf.  When you start placing the frames you might want to just place the aft frames and fore

frames on the keel first.  Leave the middle frames out so you can fair the frames with all the taper.  It made life easier

for me.  Randy



#38
rdsaplala

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Hi Daniel,

 

Just caught up with your log, you're doing some very precise and beautiful work on your ship Sir, I'll be following your build with great interest :)


Best regards,

Aldo

Currently Building:
HMS Pegasus (Victory Models)-Mothballed to give priority to Triton

 

HMS Triton (first attempt at scratchbuilding)

 

 


Past build:
HM Brig Badger (Caldercraft), HM Brig Cruizer, HM Schooner Ballahoo


#39
the learner

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I have thought of trying the three piece method and now will do, I have a mill but think this method is faster than setting it up and you still have the taper to apply


Cheers, Guy
The Learner
Current Member NRG,SMA

 

Current Build: HMS Triton 1:48 on line

 

 

 


#40
AnobiumPunctatum

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Guy,

 

the layer method is definitly not faster than the work with a mill. You have to do the taper twice, first time for the middle layer and a second time for the other layers.


Regards Christian
 

In the shipyard: HM Sloop Fly, 1776 - Scale 1/32;

On the drawing board: Naval Cutter Rattlesnake, 1777 - Scale 1/32





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