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Morgan

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About Morgan

  • Birthday 10/03/1961

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    gary.morgan666@hotmail.co.uk

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  1. Hi Daniel, All looking good. Some additional points to consider for the 1805 slice. The bolster at this date was extended forward, see the blue highlighted area below. This provided a small ledge for foot support when working the anchors, my sketch is conservative, they are often shown extending further forward. An additional feature that is not commonly represented, but is intrinsic to the berthed-up forecastle barricades is that the gunwale above the foremost port was hinged such that it swing up and over to create easier access to the outside of the shi
  2. Michael, In practice the cannons could be moved several degrees from centre so they could in theory, and subject to the curvature of the hull / width of the gunport, all fire at 90 degrees to the ship, but I think this would look wrong on the model and you should, in my opinion, go with 90 degrees to the hull at each gunport location, as per the real ship has them displayed. Gary
  3. Thanks for the note, she is now with the National Maritime Museum (SLR0651), from what I recalled all the Science Museum ships were transferred so I thought I’d check and they have better images of her.
  4. Interesting details on the Endymion, there also appears to be a chimney abaft the mizzen. Records show portable stoves were issued to Ships, but I’ve never seen physical evidence before. It’s the kind of detail a sailor would pick up as opposed to a dockyard model maker. Whilst not as aesthetically pleasing sometimes such models hold a wealth of detail that would otherwise be lost to us. Where is this model housed? Gary
  5. You should read ‘The Challenge: Britain Against America in the Naval War of 1812’ by Professor Andrew Lambert, he brings the views of James and Roosevelt up to date and corrects both. Gary
  6. I think financially a pair of frigates such as Shannon and Chesapeake would out sell any others on the market, there is a real history there with broad appeal on both sides of the Atlantic (and broader), the great thing with a Leda class such as Shannon is that there are over 40 sister ships to choose from from the Leda herself with open rails forward through to the Trincomalee and later berthed up configuration. I know this has been touched on before, but there is a point when you have to look at the balance between what you want to design and what sells and that is so much harder with the l
  7. I’ve used Britannia white metal for casting many times and can highly recommend it, no shrinkage, flows well and minimal fumes makes it easy to work with. Gary
  8. Daniel, I would have thought the lower edge of the cover would have a bolt rope like the edge of a sail in order to provide a uniform distribution of tension, it’s where a sailmaker would default to if you think about it, with eyes or loops in the bolt rope at each stanchion for tying down. Gary
  9. Daniel, Go back to Turner. We know the Poop deck cranes were boarded over on the outside, this probably applied to the waist as well, but not the Quarterdeck or Forecastle (although this changed in future years). Netting to the inside of the hammock cranes. We can see from Turner that the covers sat as an envelope over the hammock cranes, probably in overlapping sections fastened at the bottom to the hammock cranes. These envelopes would have been open at the bottom to allow water and moisture to drain away and dry / air the hammocks. Gary
  10. None of the preparatory field works of the contemporary great artists who sketched Victory during the campaign of Trafalgar (1803 - 1805) show her with crows feet, these were Turner, Constable and Pocock, you’ll not get better eyewitnesses. Gary
  11. Welcome on board, nice to have another fellow north easterner on the forum. Good luck with the build, the ‘Ham n eggs’ as she was knows to the sailors of the time is a beautiful ship, I’ll tag along to see what you produce, you’re off to a good start. Gary
  12. From the plans it was either Royal George or Britannia. Royal George is a good shout for research, plenty of contemporary drawings, paintings and models. When you say it’s a while off we probably have to allow for Chris Watton development timescales with 6 models out in 2 years you run at a different pace to your competitors! Gary
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