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Merry Christmas

 

I hope that I can clearly state this question.  I see where a large number of builders bend planks and other pieces prior to placing them on the model.  This is includes using hot irons and work boards with pins or nails to bend the wood.

 

My question is how is the curve first determined so that the builder can place the pins/nails into a work board or know when the curve is sufficient when using hot irons?

 

Side question:  In mid-January I am moving to Stow, Ohio.  Are there any ship building clubs that I could join in February or March?

 

Thanks

 

Chuck A.

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Hmmm good question. The hard part is when you have a straight piece of wood and try to bend it into a sharp curve. Once you bend the wood using whatever method you like, even if its not at the exact curve, the strain in the wood to accommodate to the curve is very little compared to when it is straight. So a little extra bend or unbend has no big effect on it. At least, this is what I do.  :rolleyes:

 

Edit: And I use a hair curling iron, by the way.

Edited by Ulises Victoria
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Ah, that's why your hair looks so gorgeous :)

 

@Chuck. I bend the planking using a iron, using the model itself as a guideline. I find it alomost impossible to get the correct bend in one go. So I make a bend, try it on the ship, and repeat, until the desired curve is there (or, in my case almost equally likely, I have to start over again, as the wood splitted)

 

Jan

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Hi Chuck A. I first soak the wood to get it soft and then use the hull itself as a frame. I make the bends gradually while placing it on the hull to measure. It never comes out exactly, but close enough. The wood will still have some pliability and will allow you to form it up when pinning it to the hull finally.

 

Vince P. :dancetl6:

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As Vince says - use the hull as a  frame .

You may like to protect the wood below with a piece of cling film just to stop the rest of the bulld getting damp.  

Leave over night to dry.

You will still probably want to have more than one pass at getting it right.

 

With sufficient ingenuity - clamps , spacers,elastic bands etc you should be able to get the wood bent so that it exactly fits the curve.

 

It is SO much easier then to stick or nail a piece of wood which doesnt require the sticking/nailing to also hold it for shaping purposes

Edited by SpyGlass
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I do appreciate the responses.

 

When I read the various build logs, it looks like everything is so precise and everything fits perfectly. 

 

I have yet another question; suppose a piece of wood needs to be tapered before being used.  Is it best to taper then bend or bend then taper to ensure final fit?

 

If it is best to bend then taper, how does one accurately cut/sand/plane on a curved piece of wood?

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I prefer to bend it first and then taper it. Sometimes tapering first messes up the fit. If the bend is made first, then the taper can be filed true to the bend. I simply use a sanding disk in a rotary tool to make the taper. This method has always worked for me, but other builders might have different ways to do it. Once you get some experience experimenting, you develop ways to do things that work for you. I learned from others and experimented myself.

 

Vince P. :dancetl6:

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Yup get the curve right first and taper next,  Taper using a file for the final fit.

A blade and rule for initial approx cut .

I also use a David plane BUT with the plane clamped to the bench sole up and run the strip across it. Amazingly accurate but can be rather bloody if you are careless !!

 

 Remember also that most planks will require at least one edge bevelling to  make them sit snug against each other allowing for the curve of the hull

Edited by SpyGlass
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Like the others, with bending, close counts.  I either use a curling iron or the hull, depending on what's needed  and what I'm doing.   Spiling/tapering is started before bending to get it close. Then bend and final touches with the sanding board to fit.  I'm far from perfect on my planking but trying to get better.

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When I read the various build logs, it looks like everything is so precise and everything fits perfectly. 

 

Don't be fooled.  What you see in the pictures are the pieces of wood that have been tortured into shape.  It is rare that a piece fits perfectly the first time.

 

Bob

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