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Stropping Blocks


hof00
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A question that I have prior to rigging the Endeavour.

I have been using annealed, Plastic coated wire in my previous Models, 19th century or later as this represents Iron Strops for this period. (And is pretty easy to form.)

 

For a 18th century Ship, I believe that the Blocks were Stropped with rope.

Does anyone have a "Sure Fire" (Simple) method of using a rope Strop that is going to look "In Scale?"

 

Cheers....HOF.

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I have to say that I find this approach gives me some troubles.

I rig blocks exactly as the video shows, an S with a whipping in the middle.

Then pull the ends to tighten around spar or block as appropriate.

I then liberally 'paint' with 50/50 PVA as I don't like CA.

They look real good.

But the problem I sometimes get is that 'bitter' end as it were of the loop going around the block is only held by the whipping friction.

When it is rigged on the ship the block has a tensioning force applied.

That force is sometimes enough to pull the end of the loop out from under the whipping.

So what I now do is exactly as detailed, then add an extra ingredient:

Using a very fine line (I use fly tying thread) and a needle I run a couple of stiches straight through the whipping at 90 degrees.

Thereby cross stitching both loops.

 

Nick

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I used to do it that way, until I saw something much easier, and far less risky.

 

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/230-hms-vulture-by-dan-vadas-1776-148-scale-16-gun-swan-class-sloop-from-tffm-plans-completed/page-79#entry264191

 

the whole seizing is fake, and the strop is just secured with some PVA at the oppiosite end of the block. As I work in 1:100 scale, this worked far more neatly (you can make the seizing much smaller, without increasing the risk of the strop loosening while at tension.

 

Jan

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

I recently realized that the technique I was using to strop a block to an eyebolt was sort of the opposite of the one you refer to, Jan (Dan Vadas' technique of tying an overhand knot around the backside of the block).  Instead, I tie the overhand knot within the eyebolt, then apply glue to the overhand knot. The overhand knot is then hidden between the block and whatever the eyebolt is inserted into, whether that's the deck or a spar. My technique won't work if one is seizing a block directly to a spar, as the overhand knot would then be plainly visible.

 

The only downside is that I am currently using CA to secure that overhand knot within the eyebolt, until I figure out a better adhesive. I like the sound of using art preservationist glue, as mentioned in the blog about CA, and will be doing some testing on that idea.

 

In the meantime, here is a picture:  

 

post-3864-0-68645600-1458323421_thumb.jpg

 

The black line forms an overhand knot within the eyebolt. Since this was a practice run, I was using red fly-tying line to tie the seizing.

 

JD

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Further testing suggests that flat topcoat may work as an alternative adhesive to CA. I have one bottle left of Floquil Model Railroad Flat Topcoat, so I guess I better make it last! 

 

It would seem to me that when using a synthetic thread like fly-tying line to tie a seizing around a cotton/linen line, using PVA type glues to secure those seizings will be less effective. Let me know if anyone can confirm that.

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  • 2 weeks later...

It would seem to me that when using a synthetic thread like fly-tying line to tie a seizing around a cotton/linen line, using PVA type glues to secure those seizings will be less effective. Let me know if anyone can confirm that.

That must be why so many of my sizings have slipped/failed!! I will have to try the varnish.

 

Sam

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Here is a 1/8" block I stropped and attached to an eyebolt on the foremast for my Pride 2. The line is .008" line from Syren, and the seizing is done with fly tying line. The technique I used was the s-shaped technique shown on the video in the post above. I think it has turned out pretty well. I think the only way to improve on it is to use the technique of David Antscherl, where you create a small closed loop of line, then seize it to the block. The closed loop is big enough that it leaves a loop available on the other side of the seizing, where the eyebolt or spar would go.

 

The second picture shows an overview of the area, where the foremast and the foretopmast meet.

 

 

 

post-3864-0-08424200-1459632302_thumb.jpg

post-3864-0-99382000-1459632354_thumb.jpg

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