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Kurt,

 

Not that I've seen on Google.   I've heard of it but never used it.

 

You can get it on E-Bay:  http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=butapren&clk_rvr_id=996470600024&adpos=1o1&treatment_id=7&crlp=94296869454_857&MT_ID=70&device=c&rlsatarget=kwd-19017607590&keyword=butapren&geo_id=10232&poi=&crdt=0&ul_noapp=true

 

 

Apparently a lot of shoe repair shops also use it.  

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Hello Kurt, not sure how (industrial) you need your glue to be, but after years of furniture making I tried Titebond for my model building with sub par results. I found that Aleene's Tacky glue works great for modeling. Great initial grab and you can find it at Walmart ( imagine that) worth a try anyway.

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Hi Keith,

I was curious about the sub par results you were having with Titebond.

 

Thanks,

Richard

 Hi Richard, two things that really bothered me about Titebond was the shifting of a piece as it dried. The other was squeeze out when drying probably due to the shifting. Don't get me wrong Titebond is great for larger projects that require clamping, but for modeling, not so good.

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Are you gluing wood and/or plastic? 

 

Titebond is a trade name for a variety of glue formulation that may not be available in all countries. I've used the common Titebond often for furniture assemblies, but not for building models.  I've also used some of the different formulations,such as the 'high tack' formulation to stick ceiling-wall mouldings in place.  The high-tack formulation might work for you.

 

I am unfamiliar with a glue called 'butapren', which may be a trade name.  It appears to be similar to 'Shoe Goo'.  Another glue of this type is Eclectic E6000 craft adhesive which I think is superior to Shoe Goo  I'm doubtful as to whether either of these glues are a good choice for wood, because over time the solvents will evaporate and the solutes will shrink and no longer adhere to wood. But if you're gluing plastics together, then it may work (but I doubt that too).

 

All that said, I doubt the sole cause of the 'shifting of parts' is due to the type/choice of glue.  It's also about the fitting of the parts and the clamping methods.

Edited by Bob Blarney
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Butapren glue is an equivalent to the ordinary contact cement available in the US. It is a derivative of chloroprene and natural rubber, used primarily in the shoe industry, hence the first part of its name - "but" (a shoe in Polish). I am not a chemist, so I cannot authoritatively state its exact similarities or differences. Hope this helps.

Edited by Dziadeczek
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Are you gluing wood and/or plastic? 

 

Titebond is a trade name for a variety of glue formulation that may not be available in all countries. I've used the common Titebond often for furniture assemblies, but not for building models.  I've also used some of the different formulations,such as the 'high tack' formulation to stick ceiling-wall mouldings in place.  The high-tack formulation might work for you.

 

I am unfamiliar with a glue called 'butapren', which may be a trade name.  It appears to be similar to 'Shoe Goo'.  Another glue of this type is Eclectic E6000 craft adhesive which I think is superior to Shoe Goo  I'm doubtful as to whether either of these glues are a good choice for wood, because over time the solvents will evaporate and the solutes will shrink and no longer adhere to wood. But if you're gluing plastics together, then it may work (but I doubt that too).

 

All that said, I doubt the sole cause of the 'shifting of parts' is due to the type/choice of glue.  It's also about the fitting of the parts and the clamping methods.

Hi Bob, I work in wood only and I suggested Aleene's because of it initial tack for parts that can't be clamped. There are other factors such as temperature , humidity and my lack of patience to hold a part till it quits moving...lol

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With butapren you apply the glue to both surfaces, then wait about 15-20min until the glue dries. Only then you put the parts together and the glue bonds immediately. So there is no squeeze out. As the glue is water resistant, you cannot remove it with water. The excess glue can be removed with acetone or benzine (petroleum ether), but only before it cures. Solid glue can be removed by scraping. You cannot use the sandpaper, as the glue is elastic.

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