Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello Les here. I have a question about deck planking on a 17th century ship such as the HMB Endeavour. I would like to replace the kit supplied with something better. I will make my own. In Ron McCarthy's book Building plank on frame ship models he suggests using Sheet lime, apple or pear. Not woods I can get readily in western Canada. Would clear maple be a good replacement? 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes.  Maple would be an excellent choice.

Hard Maple, you should be familiar with- as far as color.

If you wish a more white deck, see if Soft Maple is available.

It is not my choice for anything else, but it is as suitable as

Basswood/Linden/Lime (all are Tilia sp.)  maybe a bit harder.

Another choice: Yellow Poplar -  it is not expensive either -

although you may need a larger supply to avoid the green bits.

If you want a weathered deck, the green may be just the ticket.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Les,

 

I ordered some swiss pear (and some other woods) from A&M Wood Specialty (amwoodinc.com) in Ontario.  They shipped by UPS and it arrived very promptly.  I would imagine delivery to the west wouldn't be too bad.  I told them to send me 2 foot long sections - their swiss pear is 2 inch live edge.  I've started milling the wood for planking purposes and I think it looks really good.

 

You might consider them if there isn't a more convenient special wood supplier nearby.  Only catch is that any order under $100 gets a $20 surcharge in addition to shipping.  (It wasn't hard to get my order to total over $100)

 

Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maple is indeed excellent, nice and light in color, but it doesn't sand or scrape down as fast as a softer wood.  Surprise, surprise.  Rock, hard, sugar, all the same tree.

You might look for birch, it's kind of halfway between the normal kit supplied stuff and a really hard wood like maple.  They make a lot of furniture out of it, so it must be pretty durable.

Look out for the source; if the wood is sourced in China, it'll be a different wood than something of the same name here.  It might be just as good, but be careful on mail order or otherwise not being able to put hands on it.

If it can be a little darker, you might seek out old rulers or other drawing/draughting supplies.  They can be made from boxwood, and if you have the capacity to mill your own stock might be a source

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello Les back. Another question. If I were to purchase a common 2 x 4, I could get a light coloured soft wood for decking. Spruce, pine or fir is the common supply. They are dirt cheap in North America. An 8 foot 2x4 is two dollars. I would select the best clear one and would have an almost lifetime supply of inexpensive decking or first planking on a plank on bulkhead model. Any thoughts on workability issues etc?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe a bone-straight, grade A select 2 by 4.  The grain might defeat you though.  It isn't apparent, but the grain is coarse enough to drag your tools off course, and it will allow an edged tool like a plane or scraper to work in one direction and not the other.  Get two planks glued down adjacent that the grain runs in the opposite direction and it might be interesting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I second the suggestion on poplar. It's not hard to find pieces without any green. It's very easy to work with and is harder than ordinary building pine. It has a fine grain and machines well. It's inexpensive and is readily available in 3/4" thick boards, which makes it easy to turn into ship modeling lumber. In some of the large lumber stores, you can also find boards in 1/4" and 1/2" thicknesses that are typically 3"x24" and often they are very white and almost grain free. I've used poplar on several models and like it a lot. At the moment, I'm using it to plank the outside of a deckhouse and the planks are 3mm wide and less than 1mm thick.

 

Cheers -

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John, Les (in Canada) is probably only going to find poplar in the 'Quaking Aspen' variety, 'populus tremuloides', (although there is also a 'Canadensis' hybrid of 'black poplar').  This is a softer whitish hardwood with unobtrusive grain, used for many wood products, furniture, pulp for paper, toothpicks, chopsticks, match boxes, snowboards and electric guitars among others.  The green tinged 'Poplar' is a higher quality wood and is from an unrelated genus.  'Tremuloides' is a boreal forest tree so northern and colder climates.  It turns Rocky Mountain hillsides a bright yellow in the fall.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello jbshan. Les here. I have scouted out some wood species here in a very reputable store. Their poplar is very variegated with a lot of green. Eastern Canada has a more white version. As per Matrim holly isn't available here either. Windsor plywood only carries large cuts of specialty woods. Ordering these types would cost about $100.00 dollars to do a deck from an eastern supplier. That is why a 2x4 which has a white colour was what I was thinking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...