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George W. Washburn 1890 by lb0190 - Dumas - 1/48 - Tugboat


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The George W. Washburn tugboat was launched in 1890 by the Cornell Steamboat Company to move barges and cargo like stones, sand, and bricks up and down the Hudson River between Albany and New York City. She was, during her early years, considered the fastest tug on the Hudson. Since she took on paying passengers, her appearance was kept up. It was said that a Cornell Steamboat could be notices from great distances by the yellow and black color of the smoke stacks. The George W Washburn and Cornell Steamboat Company are no longer around today.

 

This is my first effort at building a model ship. Since I've retired, I felt in need of a hobby and looked back at my younger  (much younger) years when I used to build plastic models and a RC aircraft. I remember I always enjoyed building more than flying and thought wood ship models would be challenging and longer project time. I picked the tug thinking it would be a good first build for someone new to shipbuilding and hoped it provided a number of lessons learned. At the time, not being aware of MSW and the tremendous amount of shared knowledge, I looked at the many ships available and simply picked one that appealed to me and looked reasonable for a newbie to start with.


So here we go...

 

This kit features laser-cut plank-on-frame construction. The size is: Length: 30" inches Beam: 5 1/2" inches and can be built as a static or RC model. I'll build it as RC capable but with the intent of simply displaying it.

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  • 1 year later...
Larry, I happened upon your build log of the Washburn - it's beautiful.

I have this on the shelf and want to build it, and I have a couple questions for you:

  

I have no idea what it's called, but that 'beard' of rope that you put on the bow - it just looks so authentic - there must be a term for that, do you know what it's called, and do you have any links or articles about it?  Saw the photos of you building it, looks like you learned a lot about its construction.

 

Also - did you rig this boat up for R/C, or have any experience with that?  I'm wondering how you get after those components after it's built - is it designed so that the cabin area is removable?

  

Thanks,

 Mark

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Hi Mark,

 

Thanks for looking in and for the compliments. I'll try to answer your questions in the order you asked.

 

The beard (I call it by that name also) I believe it's also called a fender. I do not think the Washburn had one in real life but I like how it looks. I found a link where someone was building beards for restored tugs and he posted a number of photos showing how he made them. I simply scaled the process down to fit my model. I'll look for the link and post it as soon as I locate it.

 

I constructed the build for RC but did not have have any intention on anything other than static display. I thought, maybe one day I would give it away or sale it to someone interested in RC boating so it's ready to add the RC hardware. The upper deck lifts off (snug fit) and has a water barrier to help prevent flooding the hull. The hull interior has plenty of room for the components and ballast. I used to fly RC but never took up boating RC.

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Larry,

 

I'm trying to plank this hull and having a problem - can you see my thread in the "Planking..." forum called "Having trouble with Washburn tug hull"?  I'm hoping you can advise me.  Translation for that is: "Please help!  How do I do this??  How did YOU do this?"

 

Thanks,

Mark

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Hi Larry,

 

I'm trying to plank this hull and having a problem - can you see my thread in the "Planking..." forum called "Having trouble with Washburn tug hull"?  I'm hoping you can advise me.  Translation for that is: "Please help!  How do I do this??  How did YOU do this?"

 

Thanks,

Mark

Good moring Mark. I just seen your post. I'll take a look at your thread and get back with you before the day is out. We'll figure out how to resolve your concerns.

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Very nice. I have a couple mini mamoli's, solid hulls, one with planking (shoulda started with, but I've been on the Niagara and lived in Michigan the 1st 42 years of my life) Both solid hulls are supposed to need no sanding. I want the rigging experience before I go back and tackle this some more.

 

Time was I thought I'd learn from my older brothers mistakes, but he never built a wooden ship. Nor did he marry my X wife.

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Brian, thank you for looking in and for the compliment. IMO, getting one under your belt (completed first build) has many benefits from learning new skills and confidence building. Learning/improving some basic skills from an easier build pays off many times when you move on to a much harder kit. Best of luck with your Niagara.

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Hello Larry .Nice job on the tug,and yes,when I was a lad  (long long ago )often hanging around the docks of Liverpool (UK)most of the tugs had rope fenders to push and shove larger boats or barges around,some I recall used old tires,those" were the days my friend "Hope you are well.Edwin

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Hi Edwin, thanks. I have had numerous visitors at home, ask about the rope fenders, many seemed shocked to hear there were tugboats before tires were available to use as fenders. IMO some of the rope fenders were woven works of art.

I'm doing ok, thanks for inquiring. The past year has been a bit rough for my health and other family members, but it's improving everyday. Take care my friend!

Edited by lb0190
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