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Fright

Nantucket Light Ship by Fright - Lindberg - 1:95 scale

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Update - sprayed hull with Dullcoat. Finished off painting all  railing brass. Next will be to paint the fire hoses that are attached to the one cabin flat black. I went about trying to remove all of the flashing from the three searchlights that will sit atop of the wheelhouse. On the back of each of the two smaller lights, there was a mold indentation. I used a dab of Elmers to fill in the impression and drilled out all three of the lights. I'm thinking I will paint the inside with chrome and then use a drop or two of my wife's decoupage clear coating as the lenses.

 

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Did some work on my mushroom anchors for the bow of ship. I found this picture of the anchors that shows four small triangular openings around the ring. I used one of my small drill bits to create the four openings on my two anchors. I will settle for round openings and not try to duplicate the triangle.

 

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1st photo:  I got the drill out again and opened up the 'vent' that is attached to the smokestack to give it a little more realism. I backed the vent up with a couple of pieces of styrene for support while I drilled so it would not snap off. I used two different bits.

 

Here are some shots of my progress with the superstructures that will eventually have led lights inside. I have used a red transparency film in behind the portholes for the wheelhouse. On some of the others portholes, I painted pieces of styrene flat black and then glued them behind portholes to block any light from shining out. On the other two cabins, I either blocked portholes or used a yellow film to reduce the white led lights. For the beacons, I will be using two led flashing lights. The one thing about a camera is it sure brings out all of the imperfections that the eye passes over. I have some touching up to do!!! 

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catching up on your project Robert......made some great progress :)    the interior looks good........with the roof on and lighting,  should give a nice impression of the furnishings.  the hull came out great........well done on the mods and paint.   the efforts your putting into this model will show up quite nicely when your finished  ;) 

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popeye - many thanks and she's coming along. I'm going to try a test run with one of the lights to see how it looks and I'll post a picture or two of them shortly. I keep finding 'little' things to touch up on the structures but I'm at the point where I need to think about building my display stand before I can go any further. I want to hide the battery pack at the back but have easy access in order to change batteries. I also want to install an on/off button for the power source. I was thinking about using a wood frame about an inch deep with a cover over it and then the ship mounted on top or, using the frame with a bottom, mounting the ship slightly at an angle and filling with 'liquid water gel' to give it a look at sea. Ah,,, decisions, decisions LOL 

 

I also invested in an airbrush but am terrified about using it for fear that I will ruin what I've done so far. Up until now, I've either used rattle cans or a brush. I need to do a lot of reading up on this method.  Aye, and with that bein' said, today is Talk Like A Pirate Day !!!  Ya know I'd like to take up bowling but I have a severe hook!   Arrr-men

Edited by Fright

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I did a trial run with one of my Pico size led's in the wheelhouse  and rear cabin to get an idea of what it would look like.   *Neither top deck nor cabin is glued down. I'm pretty happy with the way it is going to look.

 

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Edited by Fright

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looks really good........if you made the display stand 'thick' enough,  you might be able to stow the batteries and switch in the base.  shows up really good through the door.  the direction you want to go with it is a good one too :) 

 

airbrush can be good.......practice with it.  just grab something to practice on [junk,  of course.....don't want to get blamed for you painting on the walls  :D }   or.......go an buy a cheap model kit {not a bad idea if it ends up looking good......you can keep it}.

 

"follow your heart......that's what Pedro would do."    *Napoleon Dynamite*

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popeye - here's what I plan to use as my base. I picked up this 9"x20"x1.5" shadow box frame for $16.00 @ Micheal's. The AA battery pack and on/off switch will be attached on the backside of frame. Fits perfectly! I'm passing the electrical wiring thru a 1/4" clear tube (remnants from last year's surgeries) that will run from the ship's hull to the frame's edge. I will use a thin layer of Plaster of Paris (which I'm 'borrowing' from my wife's stash) to fill around the bottom of frame; paint and also use Vallejo's Water Effect Atlantic Blue gel to create an ocean effect. At least that's the game plan LOL This will be my 1st attempt at creating a water diorama.

 

 

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Edited by Fright

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Robert, don't forget to check the USCG Historian's Office for records of the light list for these Lightships - each Lightship (as well as each Lighthouse) has their own unique light flash pattern.  That is, if you plan to actually light the tower lights as well. 

Edited by Jack12477

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Jack12477 - that would be awesome but, to tell you the truth, I have zip-diddly knowledge about wiring. I have no clue how I would go about getting my 3mm LED's to flash in that pattern!  I've looked at a couple of posts where they used circuit boards etc. that are truly amazing, but again, way over my head. This is why I chose battery over AC - I'd hate to electrocute myself when I power it up LOL  

 

As for the beacon lights on towers, I originally thought they were in two pieces and I would run the wire up the center. NOT!  They are solid plastic towers. I'm thinking that I may be able to attach the thin wire along the tower and try to hide it underneath the ladder that is attached to the tower. ? 

 

Last, but not least, I want to thank you for taking a look and your suggestion. Greatly appreciated! Have a good weekend!!! :cheers:

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Robert,  you could make them a fixed white light, as some early lighthouses were configured that way before the advent of "occulting devices" which were used to "hide" the light for a period of time making it appear to flash (in the days before electric lights).   I haven't been able to find a reference that lists the patterns for Lightships - plenty of references for stationary lighthouse tho. 

Edited by Jack12477

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Jack12477 - My two 'beacon' lights that I will be using are 3v 3mm white Led with a slow flash that I ordered from Evans Design. On the site, he suggests that they be on their own power source to prevent flash leakage to any solids. He suggests using coin battery to power them. My solids will be hooked up to a AA battery pack. I tried to find the flash pattern for the Nantucket online but had no success. It's also very hard to find pictures of this ship that is pre-1960. Almost all are good quality pictures, but are taken after her retro-fit to diesel power in 1960. They do help in showing some of the deck equipment that were painted with spar. I downloaded the official USCG color regulations that say what colors are used on what equipment. With that, thanks for the feedback and have a wonderful weekend! :cheers:

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Sounds like a good compromise, Robert.  Yes, information on the lightships is hard to come by, especially the early years.  When I was restoring our local lighthouse, I did a lot of research and found there's a lot of information on the lighthouses themselves but not much on the lightships.   Another good organization, in addition to the USCG Historian's Office, that might have some useful historic information is the United States Lighthouse Society formerly in San Francisco now in Washington State.  They have a section on their website which contains a list of downloadable books on lighthouses

 

Your model is looking good BTW !

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in regards to the solid towers,  you could look at Plastruct and Evergreen......they carry hollow tubes.  if the towers are of a hyperboloid or of a tripod style construction,  you might be able to scratch build them using the hollow tubes.  this would be a good way to wire the lights without them being seen.   :)               

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popeye - I was aware of Evergreen but I've not heard of Plastuct. I will look up their products. On the solid masts, there are three locations that have 'rings' around the masts. I imagine these were some type of metal supports. I was thinking that it may be possible to cut off these three sections on the solid towers, drill a hole thru them for the wire, and join them with the hollow tube. There may be a possibility that they could slip inside of the hollow tubes to form the bonding. Thanks again for shedding some light on this problem. Cheers! :cheers:

My look for work until the end of October. Aye, 'tis a good life, but they don't supply us with any rum LOL

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I wasn't aware of this either.....I've only seen the white Plastruct products.  I'll keep this in mind as well :) 

 

nice picture..........but that's how I've pictured you already .........I mean,  avatars don't lie............do they?!?!?!?!  :D 

      {if yas gimmie a pipe 'an a saila hat,  I kin look like mine too  ;) }   Ak - k-k-k-k--k!

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I've been really busy with work but I managed to get some work done with some of the small detail parts on the superstructures, as well as starting work on the two light towers.  Nothing has been glued down to the deck.  I'm using Evergreen .219" tubing, metal rings, small balsa wood strip and some of the cut-off pieces from the solid kit's towers to complete. 

 

 

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If you’re doing a seascape display, you might want to check out the technique described here:

 

http://www.shipmodels.info/mws_forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=155661

 

I believe the modeler is a professional artist and his painting, weathering, and seascapes are perhaps the best I’ve seen. Unfortunately I think he’s moved on from ship modeling, but am greatful he was kind enough to share his techniques.

 

HTH,

 

Keith

 

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Jack12477 - thanks for taking a look and I'm hoping I can finish this build by the holidays ;)

 

el cid - I thank you for sending me this link on water effects for dioramas. I'd like to portray her anchored at sea with moderate swells. I'll be using plaster of Paris (part of my wife's stash for hobbies), along with Water Effects Atlantic Blue acrylic gel and acrylic paints. I'll be looking at all of his links on effects for tips and advice. Thanks! :cheers:

Edited by Fright

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While finishing up work on the smokestack, I did not like the look of having just a large funnel opening down to the decking. I cut a rectangular piece from some thin styrene sheet and marked off the center with pencil. I then used a hole punch to make my round opening. I cut a piece of round styrene tubing and glued it into the opening. I then used a sanding stick to round off the corners until my piece fit into smokestack opening. I painted everything flat black and glued into position. It may not be accurate but it definitely looks better to having a large 'void' and it also added some visual detail to my project.

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I drilled an opening into my port and starboard navigation lights in order to install my 1mm LED lights. I was able to complete the starboard side green light this morning along with installing my 3mm LED slow flashing light onto my forward beacon tower. 

 

I want to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving !!!

 

 

 

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