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HMS Snake by drtrap - Caldercraft


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I place myshelf between two options. To leave the hull as it is, painted in mettalic black despite that glossy appearance, and to cover it later with a matt varnish (winsor & newton, galleria) wich in my tests gives a matt and cloudy overcoat finish....

I think I'll start the coppering and I'll see about the varnish during the progress of the copper application. I believe that the semi-glossy hull suits better the copper... 

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Hi Stergios, welcome to the coppering club!  Looks like a nice startm you've made.  If I may make a suggestion, I bought some CA glue debonder in case of emergencies, it does a really nice job of removing CA glue if you get the odd smear on the plates and is very easy to use.  It also does a nice job cleaning up finger tips!

 

I just added to my log answering your question on the cleaner.  After I finished the coppering I did use a metal cleaner for copper to clean off the fingerprints as these had already started to tarnish.  It was a simple procedure, dulled the copper a bit and returned it to the more pinkish colour.  I did this before posting my final picture so you can see the effect is not dramatic, but I took comfort knowing that it should oxidize more evenly which is the look that I want.

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Reading the text on the tube, 'mirror finish' and 'gloss formula' will mean you will have a very shiny end result, maybe too shiny!  The product I used just cleaned the surface and did not give a polished finish as I doubt they would have looked that way in real life. Its probably just down to personal taste.

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Reading the text on the tube, 'mirror finish' and 'gloss formula' will mean you will have a very shiny end result, maybe too shiny!  The product I used just cleaned the surface and did not give a polished finish as I doubt they would have looked that way in real life. Its probably just down to personal taste.

...any brand to suggest, Jason?

Thanks

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Reading the text on the tube, 'mirror finish' and 'gloss formula' will mean you will have a very shiny end result, maybe too shiny!  The product I used just cleaned the surface and did not give a polished finish as I doubt they would have looked that way in real life. Its probably just down to personal taste.

..that's the why I left the hull uncovered with any kind of varnish, for the moment.

I want to see whether the "something glossy like" admiralty's metallic black is in accordance with the polish and finish of the copper plates. After that I'll take my final decision on using the matt varnish for the paint and for the copper too (metal suitable varnish, here).

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Hi

I personally haven't applied any varnish to the coppering. I will be letting it tarnish naturally. It depends if you want a shiny copper hull or not.

 

Stergios, I'm taking the same approach as Jim, just leaving it to tarnish naturally.  You're making good progress, looking nice, especially the contrast with the wood and the black paint.

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Hello to everybody and many thanks.

Jason, that black paint was too glossy in my opinion.

I have applied a layer of matt Winsor & Newton varnish (1:2 in ratio to clear water (water for injection)).

I think the black paint now looks better especially on a period war ship.

Edited by Stergios
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Coppering of the hull is almost finished (I think...).

I'm trying hardly to manage and fit in shape the plates just below the waterline, is a very painfull story.

Have you tried any special tool for this procedure except the universal heavy cutter?

Thanks again.

 

PS: The alternative option is to create the so called "dressing-belt" with plates just to run neatly below the waterline....  

post-944-0-71764100-1362995128.jpg

post-944-0-35436600-1362995131_thumb.jpg

Edited by Stergios
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Any additional suggestion on waht method/toll to use to trim neatly these minor protruding edges?Thanks again.

I used a pair of fine scissors to cut the plates to shape. Any protrusions I used a flat blade needle file and small careful strokes....

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Same as Jim.  I tried to keep the overlap to a minimum, and found that if you lay the plate in place and simply use a fine marker pen to draw the profile,a dn cutting with scissors, you can get a pretty good initial fit with little effort.  Definitely second Jim's comments, use gentle strokes once the plate is glued as it doesn't take much to pop one off - minimizing the amount you need to remove in this way really helps.  Once you are very close, you can even use fine sandpaper to get a smoother edge if necessary.

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Thank you all, so much

I do appreciate your everyday's help during my "coppering" steps.

Finally I've found that using a good pair of scissors and a flat diamond file is the best way (to me) to handle the rest of copper tiles....

Pics to follow...

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