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JToma

USS Constitution by Jeff Toma - Model Shipways - Scale 1:76

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I will pick up where my previous build log left off here. Unfortunately, I won't have time to reconstruct my previous posts.

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Thanks for watching. I'm glad I saved all the pictures which is not something I normally do. There will be another update in a couple of days. I finished the head rails on the other side, installed the gratings and toilets, and I'm now working on planking above the head rails.

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That's a great looking Connie. It doesn't appear that you used the coppering method in the kit. What did you use for your copper bottom?

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That's a great looking Connie. It doesn't appear that you used the coppering method in the kit. What did you use for your copper bottom?

 

 I used copper plates from Caldercraft. I tried using the copper tape but had a difficult time with it and just ended up making a mess.

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Jeff it is good to see your progress. As I look at all your pictures, it brings back memories of my build.

You are doing a great job on the difficult bow section. Are you planning to do the carving out of styrene as Bob suggested? I have not tried to do mine yet.
You might also keep in mind that Bob forgot to add the extension blocks for the hawse pipes. They are intended to prevent the anchor chains from damaging the rails.

 

I'll keep watching.    B)

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Jay,

I haven't decided yet what to do with scrolling on the bow. I think I'd like to try to carve it but the practicum really leaves out a lot of the detail on how to do it so I don't know. I may try it to see if I can do it. I did see what you did with the hawse pipes and I'm doing the same thing right now as a matter of fact. It does look like the right way to do it based on the plans and pictures.

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Quite a while back I asked Bob why he chose styrene instead of, say, boxwood. He said he had a lot of carving trouble with boxwood breaking along the grain. Since plastic has no grain, he found it easier to work with. Also, boxwood would need to be painted if you wanted to match the rest of the trim. Me-I have trouble with both.

 

Looks really good Jeff. Glad you're up to date. Another build log to follow!

 

Thanks,

 

Harvey

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Enjoying the photos of your build, very nice work. I plan to build that kit someday and seeing it done through your fine photography will be most helpful. A 2D plan at times can not match a good photo with ithe light and shadows. I'm also trying to convice my wife how much she wants to go to Boston. Looking forward to the next post.

Thanks

Andrew

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Thanks Harvey, Greg, and Andrew.

 

I would like to try and carve it one way or another but I've never carved anything so I don't have much confidence.

 

I made the trip to Boston a few years ago to see the Constitution. It was a fantastic experience and Its a must do! So make the trip Andrew!

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Jeff,

 

Along with all the excellent carving articles/practicums out there, one of my favorite books is The Shipcarver's Handbook by Jay Hanna. It's written for full size carving, but it's still an excellent reference. One of these days, I need to dig my copy out and start some trail boards for our boat.

 

Give it a try. It's not that hard, and I suspect your work will come out just fine.

 

Thanks,

 

Harvey

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Now that MSW is back up and running, its time for an update. I have
finally finished the work on the bow after what seems like an eternity.
The exception is the scroll work which I'll do later. This is kind of a
major milestone in the Conny build as it completes all the major
structure and hull work. I can't believe I actually made it this far
since this is only my second ship kit.

 

If I follow the order of the practicum the next step will be the
outer hull details like the gunport covers, davits, and chainplates.
However, I think I'm going to skip ahead to the next chapter and do the
deck details first because it seems like it would be too easy to knock
stuff off of the hull if I do hull first.

 

Pictures follow.

 

 

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Looking great Jeff.

I think you are right about skipping the outside details until you have done some of the deck details. I had gone ahead with the gun ports and ended up breaking a couple while doing other things. I did hold off with the channels and chainplates for the same reason and I am glad I did.

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Thanks Jay.

 

I've just finished the binnacles and the next step is the ships wheel. I think I will skip that for the time being while I figure out what method to use in building it. I'll move on to the capstan instead.

 

The following pictures show how the binnacles were made.

 

The first thing I did was glue some strips of wood together to form the basic shape of the binnacle. The practicum method suggests to cut the pieces to size but I found it way to difficult to work with such small pieces. So I cut the pieces to a longer length and worked from there as the following picture shows.

 

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The plans suggest that the corner pieces of the binnacles were made of mahogany. I don't have any so I used a stain pen to color the wood.

 

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I cut some 1/4 inch square pieces for the base and glued them on. Then it was just a matter of cutting the two pieces out to size.

 

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Making the top per the practicum was not optimal in my opinion. It had you constructing the pyramid shape from multiple pieces. I chose an easier way by using the Byrnes sander to create a little pyramid on the end of a 5/32 square dowel. I cut it off and glued it to the top of the first piece. The picture shows the dowel and a completed piece.

 

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To make the lantern on top I just used the head of a brass nail. For the color of the top piece I deviated from the practicum again. Instead of gluing a piece of gold leaf on each side of the top, I just used gold leaf paint that I got at Michaels. Much easier.

 

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After that it was just a matter of gluing them on to the deck. You may also notice the shot racks on the gratings. I left the brass wire unpainted since i like the way it looks.

 

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Another view

 

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and one more :)

 

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Nice work. I love those stain pens. They are so much more tidy than stain and a paint brush, and the variety of colors!!  I like your lanterns too. How did you round your nail heads?

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Thanks Sarah. The stain pens are handy, no muss, no fuss. The brass nails I used have a rounded head, so all I had to do was cut the head off and glue it on.

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Jeff,

Glad to see you postings continued.  I'm still struggling with my Mantua kit, but hope to get started on the larger Model Shipways kit.  I'm going to try your method of copper plating the hull.  I hope you don't mind some questions.  I'm sure I'll have a few.

 

Take care, Bob

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