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Bertu

HMS Victory 1805 by Bertu - Caldercraft - Scale 1:72

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Robert, that's exactly what I meant - but you did a better job than I did! I like your solution for the jig. I might just borrow that idea. I toyed with the idea of attaching a mini level to a jig but when I think about it your approach is better because you don't have to worry about the boat itself shifting out of true - if I understand your method correctly. Keep up the brilliant work.

Ian

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Absolutely beautiful build, if this is your third build, you should never give it up this hobby for quite some time because it looks like your calling for sure.

 

 

mike

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Bob,

Thank you for your encouragement.

 

 

Ian

About the jig, that is what I thought as well, that I would not have to worry about the levelling but I had to do it as well. I cut the jig the exact size of the gunport but because of the curvatures of the hull the outside of the jig tends to point upwards, you have to file just a little the top and bottom of the gunport very edges to bring them horizontal so that the jig lays level. In fact I extended the jig a bit longer so I can check that it is level with the small spirit level showing in one of the pictures. There are smaller levels than the one I have which I think would be better for the job and I think it is a very good idea if you had to have it fixed to the jig, as you said. 

 

Mike

Thankyou. I do not intend to give up this hobby, on the contrary, I am hoping I have more time for it in the future.  I really enjoy it and while I am doing it my mind drifts away from other problems.

 

 

Robert

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Hi chris,

 

Thank you for your comment.  I went through your build, it is fabulous.  

 

 

Finally I started the hull planking.  

 

I made six bands on each side.  I did not like the way they met at the bow,  so I decided to do some edge bending.  I know the proper way is by spiling, but the lime strips provided with the kit are easily bent after soaking them, even edgewise.  I pre shape them, let them dry, then glue them. After they are dry they keep their shape, they do not spring back, so did not need any forcing to fit them thus avoiding any clinker effect.

post-18504-0-08804000-1456068424_thumb.jpgpost-18504-0-74968500-1456068458_thumb.jpgpost-18504-0-91713300-1456068577_thumb.jpgpost-18504-0-06178000-1456068599_thumb.jpgpost-18504-0-15632300-1456068712_thumb.jpgpost-18504-0-41195300-1456068627_thumb.jpg

 

I measured the distance between each band on each bulkhead and transferred them onto a chart from which I worked out the width for each plank at every bulkhead.

post-18504-0-05907800-1456068855_thumb.jpg

 

I marked all the plank widths on the bulkheads so I have a good idea where I stand with every plank I fit.

 

post-18504-0-66918400-1456068645_thumb.jpgpost-18504-0-62978200-1456068666_thumb.jpgpost-18504-0-26005700-1456068691_thumb.jpgpost-18504-0-25764400-1456068745_thumb.jpgpost-18504-0-89103500-1456068821_thumb.jpg

 

This is going to take me some time as I have to let the planks dry before I fit them.

 

Robert

post-18504-0-29865200-1456068763_thumb.jpg

post-18504-0-99897900-1456068780_thumb.jpg

post-18504-0-06133100-1456068801_thumb.jpg

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Robert, very nice approach with the battons. I wish I was behind you so that I could have stolen your ideas for the first planking. The lime wood was wonderful to work with - easy to plane and sand. The first two planks under the transom are very tricky but you've done a great job. Even N. Longridge (The Anatomy of Nelsons Ships) talks about that very plank(s): "The most difficult plank of all to shape and to fix is the aftermost plank of the first strake beneath the main wale. It curls rather than bends around the lower edge of the outer extremity of the wing transom...All I can say is boil that plank."

 

Best, Ian

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Hi Robert

            Your planking is looking very neat and tidy, it will save a lot of time sanding and filling later on

Also i love the idea you've had to put a spacer on the push pins so that they don't have to be driven all the way in :)

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Hi Robert, beautiful job. Are you not beginning to run into quite a bit of twist at the bow? I guess with your increasing taper you are able to edge bend. Please keep the pictures coming.

 

Best, Ian

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Bob,

Thank you for your comment.  The push pins I found were 10mm long and that's too much to just keep the plank in place.  With the spacer they are much more convenient,  Very easy to push in and to pull out.

 

 

 

Ian,

Thank you for your comment.  The twist at the bow is not that bad.  The lime planks supplied with the kit can be beautifully worked.  Even edge bending is quite easy with them.  The only drawback is that it is a bit time consuming.   By wetting the strips I can practically edge bend them on my fingers little by little, I don't have to pin them to any jigs.  I use a bit the hot electric bender too.  When the plank is shaped  I pin it lightly to the hull and leave it to dry in place. When it dries it fully keeps the twisting and the edge bending.  I glue them when they are fully dry.  From 6mm they taper to about 3.6 and some a bit more at the bow, so as you pointed out they are easier to edge bend. At the bow I won't be needing any drop planks, not that I see anything wrong with them.  At the stern I will need a few stealers.

 

 

Robert

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Those limewood planks are a dream to work with. I didn't really learn that edge bending was viable until after first planking and much of my second planking was finished.

Ian

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Kevin,

Most welcome. Just had a look at your build, great build.  Please let me know of any corrections you might see fit while I struggle along way behind you.

 

Robert

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Halfway through the first planking.

Taking me time as I can only do two planks, one on each side every day.  On each side I am gluing one plank, then shape the next one by trimming, wetting and heating and dry fit it in place to dry.  Next day I remove it, it keeps its shape perfectly, glue it in place and prepare the next one for the day after.  I'm glad I took Ian's and Nick's advice to do the filler blocks.I'm sure I would have regretted it if I didn't do them.

 

A few images

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Robert

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Edited by Bertu

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Robert, as I sit here with my morning coffee I am struggling to find words that express my admiration for the job you are doing. The precision you have reached is incredible. Why don't you consider getting some good black walnut or other good quality wood for your second planking? The kit supplied Mansonia leaves a lot to be desired. That is if you aren't going to copper.

Best, Ian

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Ian,

Thank you for your nice comment and encouragement.  To be honest with you whether to copper it or not has been brewing in my mind since the day I started building the kit. From the little experience I have I agree with you, I don't think the Mansonia supplied with the kit will do a proper job.  I can see different shades in the planks supplied and I am sure they will stand out. Locally there is no way I can source a supplier to get the black walnut from.  Do you know of a reliable supplier from where I can get it?  I would prefer to finish it in timber than copper.

 

 

Bob / Joe

Thank you for the encouragement.  It means a lot to me. Makes it easier for me to take the plunge for more challenging jobs like finishing the hull in timber.  Depends if I can get hold of better planks then the once supplied with the kit.  Any suggestions from where to get it will be appreciated.

 

 

I would also like to thank all those for the Likes.

 

Robert

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that planking is incredible! I certainly wish I'd put in filler blocks around bow and stern!

 

If your manzonia is anything like mine supplied in the constructo kit, it's every possible shade of brown/orange /yellow. not the best for planking a hull

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Sorry Robert, I have no idea where you might source walnut in your location; would the ones advertised on this site be feasible? Not for me with the American dollar where it is these days. One might think that black walnut is quite dark but in fact most of the black walnut I have and have seen (which I found locally) is typically lighter than or certainly no darker (at least after it has faded) than the mansonia. Given the variation in the mansonia that may not be a very useful comparison.

 

However, some of the mansonia is actually quite nice. I don't mind the variation of colour at all - it looks rather nice polished up (especially scraped and covered with poly). I had to reject somewhere between 10 and 15% of the mansonia (pretty much dried up worthless junk). If you have to use it I think you can make it look pretty nice - but if you do have an option to use cherry or black walnut (or brown?) I would not hesitate to go for it. Both the mansonia and walnut bend quite readily. 

 

Best, Ian

Edited by Seventynet

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Nick , Kevin, Waspy, Joe, Bob, Ian

 

Thank you for your comments. 

 

 

I think the second planking supplied with the kit is walnut (1mm x 5mm), and in the parts list it is listed as walnut. I was thinking it is mansonia as it has quite a few strips with a greyish shade. I am no expert in wood and probably walnut comes in a greyish shade as well.  

 

post-18504-0-92668200-1457868791_thumb.jpg I separated the most extreme greyish once.  I would still have enough strips for the hull and use the greyish once for the sides where it is going to be painted.

 

 

post-18504-0-07981400-1457868811_thumb.jpg This is how they look if they are fixed next to each other.

 

 

post-18504-0-10634700-1457868890_thumb.jpg The two shades separated, next to each other.

 

I am still undecided what to do,  that is, if to try the wood I have with the kit or try to find better quality.  On the other hand, as you said Ian, I wouldn't mind some variation in shade as long as it is not an extreme. I wouldn't want the hull to look so perfect and shiny like it is the hull of a yacht.  

 

 

Robert

 

 

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Robert I am quite sure that wood is Mansonia, aka African Walnut (which so far as I know is not part of the walnut family). I should say that Don Robinson alerted me to this fact. In any case the main problem with my wood is that a large percentage is dried up, speckled junk, most of which I had to reject and some of which I inadvertently used. What I mean is if I sight along the surface of the wood I can see dips and shallows up to one third of its thickness. It's not hard to imagine sanding right through wood like that. It also cracks readily. I will not have enough of the kit wood to finish so I was fortunate enough to track down a board locally - their last piece. I can't tell from the pictures whether your wood may have the same problems. Quite possibly not, in which case go forth without any regret. Again, the wood looks pretty good polished up.

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Ian, thank you for your reply. The wood supplied with the kit does not have that kind of problem. It seems to be all at an even smooth thickness. The only thing I can see is the different shades. I think I will have a go with it. Your finished hull looks fabulous. It did not take me much to convince myself how great the hull looks finished in wood after I saw your work.

For now I am still trying to finish the first planking. I will post some images when ready.

 

Robert

Edited by Bertu

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Thanks Robert. Judging by the job you are doing on the first planking your second planking will be spectacular. I can't wait to see it.

Best, Ian

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