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Tophog

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About Tophog

  • Birthday 06/02/1958

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    AmosTheWonderPig
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    AmosTopHog@yahoo.com

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    Male
  • Location
    Long Island, New York, USA

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  1. started this build on the weekend. Started by painting the head and tale with red spots per the instruction on both sides of the false keel.The 9 ribs were then attached to the false keel and glued in place. Scored the one piece deck with a number #2 pencil to represent the deck planks the glued the deck to the false keel and ribs.
  2. The boat types were quite varied, depending on what the ship was intended for, But they were generally characterized as being slender and flexible boats, with symmetrical ends with true keel. They were clinker build. Some having a dragons head or other circular object protruding from the bow and stern. Viking ships are usually seen divided into two broad categories: Merchant ships and Warships. These categories are overlapping however, some kinds or merchant ships were also regularly deployed as warships. The majority of Viking ships were designed for sailing rivers, fjords and costal waters, while a few types, such as the Knarr, could navigate the open sea and even ocean. The Viking ships ranged for the Baltic Sea to far from the Scandinavian homelands, to Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Greenland, Newfoundland, the Mediterranean, the Black Sea and Africa. This model is typical of a warship with dragon head and tail. Length is 20" over all. Looks to be a fun build.
  3. Looking forward to this build as my Grandfather was a big builder of ship models. All of them from scratch and from plans that came from "Scientific America" magazine. His father, my Great Grandfather, was a Harpooner aboard a Whaler. This model by Artesania Latina is a small model only 310mm (12.2 inches) in length, 240mm (9.4 inches)in height and 78mm (3 inches) in beam. The scale is 1:25. Looks to make a nice little model. The question is to build this model with sails or without sails as would be the case when chasing a whale during the hunt. It has been some time since I have tackled a wooden ship model, as home and job leave me with little time.

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If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

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