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Heavily decorated ships


Eibwen
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So, I have been loving sculpting things using a salt dough and y trusty hobby knife (for my ship) and I do not know where to put them so it is really better to have plans when making a ship (since it is custom made)

 

So, do you have any ships which are heavily decorated? Full with sculptures and figurines? Full with Gilded structures??

any ship can do if it has those listed above :)

 

I appreciate your help

 

gotta love this

 

-Eibwen

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You may wish to take a look at these 2 vessels - plans produced and sold by AAMM:

 

LA COURONNE
LA REALE DE FRANCE

 

Taubman

these later 17th Century 3 deck vessels

ROYAL KATHERINE
PRINCE

 

I think these are kit plans,  I would verify that the hull is the correct length before I used them.

There was a set of plans where the person drafting the kit plans mistook keel length= touch for keel length= LBP.

generating a vessel that was about 25 feet too short in hull length.

 

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Brian, I am not sure if he is referring to the same salt dough that I know, but: salt dough is what Chinese cooks use to make a dish called "beggars chicken". It is a mixture of 2/3 flour, 1/3 salt, and enough water to make a cement-like dough. It is rolled out, then the chicken placed inside with herbs and flavourings, then the whole thing is sealed to make a parcel, then baked. The chicken cooks in its own juices, and no moisture or flavour escapes. When it comes out of the oven, it is rock hard and needs a hammer to break it open, revealing the tender chicken inside. 

 

The story goes that a beggar stole a chicken. When the farmer came looking for his chicken, the beggar wrapped the chicken in mud and threw it into the fire. This resulted in the most tender, juicy, and intensely flavoured chicken he had ever eaten, so a new dish was born. I still get excited whenever I am served this. 

 

I had never thought of using salt dough for modelling. Salt dough is easy to handle, softens with water, easy to clean, and holds details well. The only question is - how durable is it?

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Salt dough ?  Whats that brother ?

A non toxic, easy to make, substitute for clay that backfires when introducing it to young children. Its pretty much flour, some Kyro syrup, and salt mixed with water into a paste.  It can be poured into molds, or shaped and sculpted, and then baked to hold form.  After its baked, it can be carved, like an old piece of salt tack.

I remember my Kindergarten teacher making it for us to sculpt Christmas ornaments.  Somehow, after these were baked, the ornaments had a appetizing smell so I licked mine, a Christmas tree, and it tasted good, so, along with the mint flavored paste used to glue on additional decorations, became an afternoon snack.

 

The dog also thought they tasted good.  After getting told by the teacher to quite eating the dough and make my dang ornament, I did happen to get a really cool Christmas tree made, complete with lights, tinsel, bulbs, and a gold star on the top, that any six year old would be proud of.  My parents were proud too, and let me hang it myself a full 3 feet from the ground, just far enough for our spaniel to take notice, and around midnight, turn my beloved ornament into a late night snack.  

 

About twenty years ago, I was helping my mother clean out some old boxes when they were moving to a new house, and at the bottom of one box, was a half eaten, salt dough ornament of a Christmas tree.  Other then a few minor cracks, it held up well for forty years.  

Edited by ScottRC
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I would say that from a sculpting point of view the French are more interesting than the Dutch.

The Dutch din't go far beyond basic carving. (and painting it kind of goldish).

Quite a lot of it on many of their ships, but not very elaborate in terms of sculpting.

 

Salt dough, ah, sweet memories. Kindergarten, schoolparties. Fun to do. Easier to handle than heavy clay. undestructible when baked.

 

Jan

Edited by amateur
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The most heavily decorated ship of the American Navy was the USS President. When launched in 1800, she had a triple figure head, consisting of the bust of George Washington sitting on a rock, supported on either side by two full length female figures, each representing an important virtue.

Edited by uss frolick
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Brian, I am not sure if he is referring to the same salt dough that I know, but: salt dough is what Chinese cooks use to make a dish called "beggars chicken". It is a mixture of 2/3 flour, 1/3 salt, and enough water to make a cement-like dough. It is rolled out, then the chicken placed inside with herbs and flavourings, then the whole thing is sealed to make a parcel, then baked. The chicken cooks in its own juices, and no moisture or flavour escapes. When it comes out of the oven, it is rock hard and needs a hammer to break it open, revealing the tender chicken inside. 

 

The story goes that a beggar stole a chicken. When the farmer came looking for his chicken, the beggar wrapped the chicken in mud and threw it into the fire. This resulted in the most tender, juicy, and intensely flavoured chicken he had ever eaten, so a new dish was born. I still get excited whenever I am served this. 

 

I had never thought of using salt dough for modelling. Salt dough is easy to handle, softens with water, easy to clean, and holds details well. The only question is - how durable is it?

Well it appears you need a hammer to break it so...........Also, thanks for making me hanker for some baked chicken.

 

mike 

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The recipe all over the internet says:

1 teacup of salt, 3 teacups flour, 1 cup of water (or less, when the mixture gets too thin), and one teaspoon of vegetable oil.

Mix salt and fliour, then add oil and water till consistency is correct.

Never tried to make the stuff myself (just used the stuff pprepared by our kindergarten teacher :) )

Jan

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