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The Lady Nelson by Overworked724 - Victory Models - 1/64


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Hi Patrick.

So a man of few words :)

 

Nice choice of a kit for beginners.

Lots of builds on the forum for The Lady Nelson.. catch up on the reading and look at the parts and the plans.

Have a clear understanding of the sequence of the build.

If you have any droughts then ask.

 

Will follow along as I do like my cutters.

 

Regards Antony.

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Looking forward to your log. There's no shortage of cutters now on this forum, so you'll get plenty of interest and as much information as you want. The first steps may be the most daunting but you should soon find your feet. As Antony said,don't be afraid to ask about anything you find puzzling. There's no such thing as a stupid question here. Everyone has at some stage gone through the same learning process and very happy to help others through the inevitable problems that arise.

 

Just one word of advice which may make no sense now but you should pin somewhere for future reference: it's better to leave the mast cap off until you've finished the shrouds and other ropes that have to go over the top. I really wish someone had given me that tip for my own model as right now it's proving very fiddly to tie ropes between the mast and topmast.

 

Tony

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Another thing that might help at the very early stages is not to fix the stem, keel and sternpost until you have finished the planking. That way you will not damage those parts when sanding down and finishing off the planking. I had to spend ages taking off the scratches on all three once I had done my planking. This applies especially to the stern post as you have to make a bearding line and place the edges of the planks in line with the edge of the sternpost.

 

There are lots of things like this that were not covered in the instructions given with the kit I'm building. It may be that the Lady Nelson instructions are slightly better, but as they are from the same company and have a very similar construction, I'm taking the liberty of giving my own experience!

 

Tony

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First, I thought I would post a pic of my new hobby shop (shipyard).  After a flurry of packing/unpacking....we are slowly getting settled in...and my wife is extremely happy she can now 'send me to my room!'  I now (finally) have some elbow room and storage which I did not have before.  (I made the desk from 3/4" plywood, (2) cheap 9-hole cubby bookshelfs, and some 1" x 3" stock pine - all from Lowes) 

 

I thought I would also post my first (tiny) hiccup.  (People have probably mentioned this before - but I haven't been reading any other forums yet....so I am proud of myself that I caught this mistake)..The plans call for the bulkheads to be placed within the frame sequentially from the bow beginning with 2, 3, 4 and so on...  The problem is that the bulkheads #2 and #3 seem to be reversed.  When I dry fit them, it was obvious that what the directions list as #3 is obviously incorrect. 

 

Needless to say, if I were to line up the bulkheads (see below for dry fit picture), I would have a bear of a time with the planking!  (Not to mention my ship would end up with a very novel profile!) 

 

Now in the process of glueing up the bulkheads (correctly).  More to follow....

 

Patrick

 

Current questions:

1. Any particular brand of varnish which is best to use for wooden ship models?

2. Same question with regards to paint manufacturer?  (I plan to use Acrylic)

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Hi Patrick.

I wish my wife would send my to my man shed. Don't think she has ever sent me as yet.

 

Most of the instructions that were created by Amati are poor.

Find a build log and follow there lead. Tony ( Tkay11) is good to follow.

Test all assembleys before committing with glue. But I think you know that :)

Keep the photos coming.

 

Regards Antony.

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Well...the bulkheads were not perfectly square. Crap. But darn close. So I am taking a stab and deciding to push ahead. Seen a few posts (and recommendation from club member) to use filler blocks to shape the hull surface. Yeah...I agree. But the kit did not come with it and I need to learn from my mistakes. So darn it! I will make them!!!!

 

Put the deck on and will post pics later. Time to fair the hull. God help me.

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Deck on. Fairing the hull. Trying not to over-do. The particle board the bulkheads and centerpiece are made of grind down quickly. Thinking of putting in stern and bow fillers, but also eager to move on a make more mistakes. (Already made a few but am pressing on. Learning a lot!!!!)

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Been using a Dremell to start out. Then moved to a half round file to get the areas near the stern and bow with the greatest curvature. Now using a sanding block (1"x3") for finer work. Have been careful to try and keep things aligned. But may have messed up a bit putting in the stern pieces as they don't look exactly true. Hopefully some sanding and careful work will allow me to push forward without needing to drill them out and replace them with freshly made pieces.

 

Will make a series of some small wooden files (Starbucks coffee stirrers with some glued on strips of sand paper 220 grit). Good tip.

 

Filler blocks...um. Yeah. Never done that. Have read up on the process though. I guess worth a shot. Certainly can't hurt!

 

More to come.

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Well...been a while. Small progress....of a sort. Trying to make the filler blocks after I put on the deck was proving a bit frustrating. Finally decided to refocus on the other mistake I made. When I put in the stern pieces which are attached directly to the deck....I used CA glue. Good and bad in that it certainly gives you a strong bond for a piece that lacks any additional collateral support....bad in that it gives you about 0.5 seconds to get it properly aligned before it sets...such was the case with the two inside pieces.

 

I stared at the askew pieces for the past two weeks until last night when I finally said 'what the heck'. It was bothering me so much, I did something I have never done....Last night, I drilled them out, sanded down the CA residue stuck to the deck, carved out new pieces to the best of my ability using 1/8" birch stock plywood and my scroll saw, and set them in using wood glue to ensure I could get good alignment. This morning I touched up the underside where the slot fits into the hull with some CA...just to give it some additional support...not bad.

 

This represents the first time I have 'made' a piece from scratch to replace a screw up. I am now basking in the glory of my newly corrected mistake. One thing...mistakes tend to make me less motivated to continue to push on....having to problem solve around a screw up is VERY difficult when working with plastic. Not so with wood it seems....gave me some excellent experience and some new confidence that I can actually do something simple from scratch.

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Another question:

 

If you make a mistake and need to realign a piece glued using wood glue...how do you go about 'getting it unglued'? Yes, wood glues like Elmer's is water soluble... But once dry, it might as well be superglue! How do you go about 'wetting' the glue to get it to release?

 

I have this vision of dunking the model in a bathtub.

 

Any advice, with pics, website/video references would be useful.

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Use something that will hold the dampness against the wood - cotton or a rag, maybe paper towel, or just use some sort of applicator (squeeze bottle, syringe, eye-dropper, etc.) and just keep re-applying the water to the area you want to soften until it comes loose.  Also, some people say that alcohol works even better than water at softening up PVA, although I've never had a problem just using water applied a few drops at a time from an eye-dropper.

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Isopropanol or isopropyl alcohol are excellent for dissolving PVA. You can buy it in large quantities from eBay very cheaply. I bought half a litre which is still going strong. As Brian suggested, it's worth keeping it soaked for a while.

 

CA glue dissolves better in acetone, also available from eBay.

 

Tony

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Excellent. Will also try!

 

On a different note: soaked bulkhead frames in water and put them in my 'bending jig'...nails on a board...and did a right brilliant job preforming them for mounting.

 

But....

 

Put the damned things in backwards. Would be fine if the bowsprit was intended to come out of the stern.

 

(I am such a bloody idiot sometimes).

 

No pics. Too friggin embarrassing. The only reason I am posting is to keep myself honest and in task.

Edited by Overworked724
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