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Push hammer?


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Is anyone using a spring loaded push hammer, such as the one sold by MicroMark?

 

I have been using T-pins and pushing them in by hand but some parts of my kit are made from plywood and pushing the pins by hand is really tough. I have to push so hard while supporting the hull with my other hand I'm afraid im going to break something. I tried pushing the T-pins in with needle nose pliers but that didnt work very well either. Was wondering if the spring in the push hammer is strong enough to penetrate the plywood. 

 

Any feedback on the easiest way to insert pins for temporary holding of parts while glue dries? Would first drilling and then pinning work?

 

Thanks in advance!

Dave

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I'm following Bob Hunt's practicum on building the Bluenose. On the installation of the waterway he recommends using pins to hold the waterway in place after applying glue. However, the kit he used to write the practicum had basswood bulkheads, while mine are plywood. So the pins need to penetrate the endgrain of the plywood. 

 

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So I'm not espically looking for an alternate method, I'm looking for the proper tool to do this job. Odds are I will have more pinning to do during this build. 

 

But I'm willing to keep an open mind,

 

Dave

Edited by CPDDET
grammer
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The problem is: the plywood needs predrilling (otherwise the splitting risk is large, and becomes larger by using a heavier hammer). On the other hand: predrilling will give unsightly holes in your planking that will not close without using filler.

You may try sharp, thin pins in stead of nails. Usually works better than nails.

 

I liked using clamps, like shown here:

 

Jan

Edited by amateur
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If you’re talking about the little brass pin nails, these: https://www.micromark.com/Spike-Insertion-Plier are far more accurate and versatile for driving them in (and pulling them back out too). They were originally designed specifically for spiking model railway track, I have a set, and use them extensively for shipbuilding. I’ve had no trouble with nailing plywood, mdf and other woods. 

 

Andy

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Dave,

 

This is what I use.  Much easier than those pin pushers (I feel like I've tried them all):

 

https://www.micromark.com/Spike-Insertion-Plier

 

Much more control over the pin, and super quick and easy to install the pins and remove them.  For my first planking, I use this to push the pins just enough into the bulkhead to hold the plank in place while the glue dries.  You don't have to push them all the way in.  Often times, you can re-use the pins too which is nice.

 

 

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I have such a thing.  Spring loaded barrel, fits in your palm...push with your palm.

It bought it years ago to insert finish nails into things like picture frames or paneling onto walls.

You have to be very careful with the amount of pressure.

 

Never thought to try it on pins for a model.   Now I have to find it again.

 

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Dave,

 

I agree with Jim Rogers and all of his suggestions, even the right viscosity CA may be better than holing and pinning considering the time involved.

 

I am not a pro I rank myself as an amateurs amateur, model builder in training. I was planking my HMS Vic. and grabbed a push hammer, it worked well on basswood planks, ply bulkheads a problem I was very careful about pressure. About midships had bent 3 nails at this one spot (not a bulkhead) on the 4th nail with more pressure caved in 3 rows of planks 2 inches in width messed up 4 gun ports. Sad day in Mudville.

 

Was able to sloppily repair and the 2nd layer of planks covered the mess I created. I took that push hammer threw it in the bad tool box never to be seen again. :)

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1 hour ago, John Allen said:

Dave,

 

I agree with Jim Rogers and all of his suggestions, even the right viscosity CA may be better than holing and pinning considering the time involved.

 

I am not a pro I rank myself as an amateurs amateur, model builder in training. I was planking my HMS Vic. and grabbed a push hammer, it worked well on basswood planks, ply bulkheads a problem I was very careful about pressure. About midships had bent 3 nails at this one spot (not a bulkhead) on the 4th nail with more pressure caved in 3 rows of planks 2 inches in width messed up 4 gun ports. Sad day in Mudville.

 

Was able to sloppily repair and the 2nd layer of planks covered the mess I created. I took that push hammer threw it in the bad tool box never to be seen again. :)

John, I had a similar experience plus the nail never seemed to go in straight. Turns out to be more of a wood shredder than a pin pusher at least in my experience.

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A trick I learned from a professional picture framer was to chuck one of the small finishing nails used for the corners of picture frames into an "egg beater" hand drill and use that to drill the pilot hole. A finish nail of the same size fits perfectly into the drilled pilot hole. It's counterintuitive. You'd think the nail wouldn't be tight in the pilot hole, but it works well.

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