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Blue Ensign

H.M. Cutter Alert by Blue Ensign - FINISHED - Vanguard Models - 1:64 scale

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2 hours ago, Blue Ensign said:

knock up a little pictorial

That would be great, thank you!  I’ll enjoy it while I’m in our lock down.  

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Thank you Phill, glad you found it of help.

@ Chris, - Phew, it's always an added incentive when you have the  designer of a kit looking at a build,  I hope I've done your creation justice.

@ Cap'n Hook -  Thank s for looking in, much appreciated.

 

B.E.

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23 hours ago, Blue Ensign said:

knock up a little pictorial

That would be great, thank you!  I’ll enjoy it while I’m in our lock down.  

Stropping Small blocks

My approach to block stropping differs depending on the block purpose, and of course the smaller the block the trickier it is.

I am going to concentrate on the smallest of blocks used on gun tackles at scales of around 1:64.

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The now defunct 3mm plastic block set, I’ve only a few left.

 

This is my approach to stropping a Syren Boxwood 3/32”  (2.38mm) block using one of Chucks bijou 3mm plastic hooks.

I am using Syren 0.20mm ø line.

 

Blocks with hooks attached are the most fiddly, particularly in relation to the gun tackles, where overall length is critical and it is difficult to reproduce effective looking arrangements at scales of 1:64 and smaller.

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The block is held in a third hand tool, a smear of pva drawn across the strop grooves, and the line passed around the block and held until the pva grabs.

 

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I can then tie the ends with a simple square knot (In larger blocks I put a small seizing (0.1mm line) to secure the two ends of the line.

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One strand of the line which consists of three strands is then unravelled up to the point of the seizing. A spot of ca is then applied to this point and the strand is cut away, to allow fit thro’ the small eye on the hook of the remaining two.

The ends are passed thro’ the eye of the hook from opposite sides. (I usually have to enlarge the hole slightly (and very carefully – these things are delicate.)

 

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The ends are then again tied above the eye, a spot of ca, and the ends trimmed away.

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For this exercise I use a new No 11 scalpel blade, nothing gets closer or cuts cleaner.

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The completed block and hook cover an overall length of only 6mm, which allows a reasonable lanyard length between the two blocks that make up a side tackle.

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The lanyard also of 0.2mm line is attached thro’ the top of the strop using a needle

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and secured with a false splice.

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I apply a smear of pva to the splice and roll between my fingers before trimming the short end.

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The tackles can then be made up on a little jig.

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At normal viewing distance these are very small but can be clearly seen as a tackle with two blocks and hooks, but which don’t overwhelm the scale, and well worth the fitting in my opinion.

 

Prior to the advent of Chuck’s little hooks I also used an alternative method.

This involves drilling a micro hole in the block and inserting a hook made from a fine eye bolt.

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I insert a drill bit into the sheave hole before ca’ing the hook to prevent it being blocked.

At this size I dispense with any notion of making an eye on the hook, to save length. In the case of Alert the overall length of the combined block/hook should be no more than 6mm.  

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The line is passed around the block as before.

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This time the line is passed around the stem of the hook and secured with a square knot. A spot of ca is applied to the knot and the ends cut off.

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The overall size is the same as with the little plastic hooks.

An alternative method would be to insert the hook stem thro’ the line into the block and secure the strop at the other end. This would work where a lanyard was not required to be fitted.

 

One other method which I used on my Pegasus build is good for smaller scales.

Here I use thin wire to strop the blocks, forming the ends into hooks.

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Wire stropped blocks on Pegasus.

This method does entail painting the wire strop rope colour and the hook black, but it works just fine.

So there it is for what it’s worth.

 

Cheers,

 

B.E.

 

 

 

 

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I think I have a few partial sheets of those black hooks laying around too.  If you like them that much I can send them to you at some point.  I have to look around in case I threw them out.  But I think I have at least one or two partial sheets of hooks somewhere.  B.E...next time you order something remind me and I will toss them in the package.

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I’ll take some. 🙂

 

Thanks for the tutorial. I’ll do a little practicing following your approach. I appreciate your doing this. 
 

I’ve printed this to put with my building reference documents 😊

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Alert is completed but remains uncased as this is presently stuck down in Devonshire for the duration. Not too much of a problem as Alert is not so heavily rigged as to present dusting  issues.

To amuse myself during this covid19 lockdown I put together a build album. Something I also did for Pegasus, and Cheerful.

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5208(2)

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5200(2)

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Passes the time  and creates  a nice record of the build.

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These are three pocket sized albums that I usually order along with the larger versions.

 

 

B.E.

22/05/2020

 

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What a lovely memento of a Wonderful Build ! in fact three wonderful builds :) 

 

All The Best B.E.

 

Eamonn

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Beautiful! Thank you for such great and informative build logs. The tutorials along the way will be a reference for me  that will certainly improve my model building

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14 hours ago, Blue Ensign said:

Alert is completed but remains uncased as this is presently stuck down in Devonshire for the duration. Not too much of a problem as Alert is not so heavily rigged as to present dusting  issues.

To amuse myself during this covid19 lockdown I put together a build album. Something I also did for Pegasus, and Cheerful.

1417345790_DSC05208(2).thumb.JPG.b6fed03d2053aabe87a6155bb3ea9f79.JPG

5208(2)

1071014922_DSC05200(2).thumb.JPG.b420f68470566c6fbd8c2656a46b6ec8.JPG

5200(2)

815532088_DSC05206(2).thumb.JPG.6995812842f3422caaa5a79018fa4bfb.JPG

5206(2)

 

Passes the time  and creates  a nice record of the build.

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5214(2)

These are three pocket sized albums that I usually order along with the larger versions.

 

 

 

 

 

B.E.

 

22/05/2020

 

 

I would pay for that. You should get them published ! Thank you for sharing your knowledge on this amazing forum.

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On 3/3/2020 at 5:42 PM, Blue Ensign said:

Post 76

 Jib Rigging – what’s that all about

 

Jib Outhauler

 

This is variously called the jib sheet (Kit Instructions), outhauler, or inhauler running aft, according to which drawing you look at in the Alert Book.

 

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I call it the jib outhauler; attached to the traveller and runs thro’ the sheave in the Bowsprit end.

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 It passes thro’ a single block attached to the cutter stem before belaying to a timberhead adjacent to the Cathead.

 

Jib Halyard

 

To fit or not to fit on a model without sails.

I have seen jib halyards fitted to many bare stick models both contemporary and modern.

 

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The Alert book shows the tack of the jibsail attached to a jib tackle hooked to the traveller ring.  

The peak is attached to the halyard which passes thro’ a block at the masthead above the Fore-stay and then down to belay.

 

Unfortunately, how and where it belays is left to our imagination.

 

The kit arrangement has the tack attached to the outhauler which passes thro’ the ring atop the traveller. The peak passes thro’ a block as with the Alert book, and belays abaft the mast to the winch bitts.

Without sails it suggests the outhauler is toggled to the ring.

 

 

Steel has a lot to say about the jib halyard rigging.

 

MAIN-JIB-TACK is clinched through the swivel-eye in the traveller on the bowsprit, then reeves through a sheave-hole in the end of the bowsprit, and through an iron-bound-block, hooked and moused to an eye-bolt in the side of the stem near the water, and then brought to the windlass over the bow, and hove out; then stopt and belayed round a timber-head.

 

 

 HALIARDS reeve through the block lashed to the head of the sail, and through the block on each side the masthead. One end has a treble-block spliced or turned in,and connects by its fall to a double-block, that hooks to an eye-bolt in the deck on one side, and the other end belays to an eye-bolt opposite.

 

DOWNHAULER makes fast to the head of the sail and leads upon deck.

 

INHAULER makes fast to the traveller and leads in upon deck.

 

 

This is a lot more rigging in terms of tackles than suggested by either the kit or the Alert Book, but he is writing in 1794 presumably about the modified cutter rig.

 

According to Steel;

The halyard is 5” c line (0.63mm ø) 14” blocks ((5.5mm) tackle fall 3½”c line (0.44mm ø)

The kit indicates 0.5mm line and a 3mm block. No tackle is shown, with the halyard simply secured to the winch bitts.

 

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I fitted a 4mm block in a strop above the stays, I rigged a jib tackle as per the Alert Book and hooked it to the traveller rig.

 

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Using Syren 0.63mm line for the halyard I seized one end to the jib tackle and the other end passed thro’ the lead block at the masthead.

 

I am now presented with a dilemma as to how to proceed.

 

The Halyard is a long fairly hefty line, would it really be worked without tackles at the deck level?

Annoyingly in all the photo’s of contemporary models the detail of the lower halyard rigging is obscured or missing.

 

Marquardt offers a glimmer of hope referring to (the halyard)

might also be  rigged single, being bent to the head of the jib and reeving through a block at the masthead upon deck, where a double block was turned or spliced into the end and a fall connected this to a single block hooked to an eyebolt.

 

 

I have rigged up such an arrangement.

 

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I can’t really attest to its validity, but my inclination is that it’s perhaps preferable to simply hitching it to the winch rail.

 

 

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As far as I can see there would be a corresponding arrangement on the Port side for the Fore-sail Halyard.

 

I’ll let that percolate for a while and see if I’m happy to let it stay.🤔

 

 

B.E.

03/03/2020

 

 

Hat off Sir this is wonderful craftmanship and build. Simply beautiful.  Congratulations. 

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Cheers Guys,

 

2 hours ago, rkwz said:

I would pay for that. You should get them published ! Thank you for sharing your knowledge on this amazing forum.

Nice of you to say so rkwz, but I think it would be too expensive, and besides you get access to all the photo's in the build log for free, glad you like them.😃

 

B.E.

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fantastic build and log, thanks for sharing. I have this kit on the shelf and your efforts are both inspirational and a little bit intimating. Well done and lots of help for the novice.    

 

Malcolm

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1 hour ago, jurgisnemickas said:

Just reviewed this build. I'm thinking of building the Mamoli "Alert" scale 1/45 does anyone have any comments, please advise.

 

You could try asking your question in the general kit questions section, more appropriate than this kit specific build.

 

B.E.

 

 

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