Jump to content
Jim Lad

Here Lies Sirius

Recommended Posts

A few photos of relics from HMS 'Sirius' which was wrecked at Norfolk island on 19th March, 1790.  These were taken on our recent trip to the island.

 

First, the site of the wreck.  The remains of Sirius lie scattered on the reef in the breakers directly in line with the mountain peak on the island.

1414660181_125246-PhillipIslandNorfolkIsland.JPG.ea77c2f75c6026be41be84b1b5978261.JPG

In case you didn't think that Sirius was coppered, these are the remains of some of her copper plating.

1645725407_125529-SiriusArtifactsNorfolkIsland.JPG.71e1e3bf4f19a282400a1eca0d36fa7e.JPG

 

Of general interest, two bronze pump chambers.

59646440_125531-SiriusArtifactsNorfolkIsland.thumb.JPG.edbcd796410fa01c4c57554f161128c8.JPG

A badly twisted horseshoe plate from the bow.

1505819820_125533-SiriusArtifactsNorfolkIsland.JPG.2ccb7d92436e2094d516f79b92f12e98.JPG

Pintles and gudgeons and the spectacle plate

1736668264_125536-SiriusArtifactsNorfolkIsland.JPG.cfc51b345c908a2857a3da264b249f28.JPG

A carronade showing distress from being pounded n the reef for two centuries. I must say I was surprised by the shortness of this weapon - much shorter than later ones.

2040191753_125547-SiriusCarronadeNorfolkIsland.JPG.8f5b9e016e9a429aea35456bcfca4584.JPG

A tampion which was found still secure in the carronade barrel.  The gunner's mate certainly knew his work!

3953585_125542-SiriusArtifactsNorfolkIsland.JPG.2c13dd17e11b999d3dc11cb507a76d38.JPG

Lastly, and of interest to all builders of late 18th century models, a shackle and chain link.

1468254572_125537-SiriusArtifactsNorfolkIsland.JPG.e6c9ab2275f824f1b5650e6024b48b6b.JPG

125534 - Sirius Artifacts Norfolk Island.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, this very early trunnion carronade is most remarkable on a wreck from 1810.

I would not have thought that this type of Carronade was still actively used on a frigate around 1810.
Is it possible to add a photo from behind?

 

Thank you for sharing.👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing these.   How does one get to Norfolk Island?  Looking at maps, it seems to be rather small and quite a distance from both NZ and Australia.  

Allan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The Norfolk Island British Frigate Sirius wrecked in 1790, so the old style trunnioned carronades are appropriate.

 

The other British frigate called Sirius wrecked on Mauritius Island at the Battle of Port Southeast in 1810, as portrayed in Patrick O'Brien's novel, The Mauritius Command.

From Wiki 

Sirius sailed from [[The Motherbank, Ryde, Isle of Wight] on 13 May 1787 as the flagship of the eleven-vessel First Fleet, under the command of Captain Arthur Phillip (Governor-designate of the new colony). Phillip transferred to the Armed Tender HMS Supplyat Cape Town,[7] with Second Captain John Hunter[8] remaining in command of Sirius. Also on board were Royal Marine Major Robert Ross, who would be responsible for colony security and surgeons George Bouchier Worgan and Thomas Jamison. Midshipman Daniel Southwell recorded that Sirius was carrying the Larcum Kendall K1 chronometer used by Captain James Cook on his second and third voyages around the world.[9] She arrived in Botany Bay on 20 January 1788, two days after Supply, according to the journals of Hunter[10] and First Lieutenant (later Rear Admiral) William Bradley[11] [12] The 252-day voyage had gone via Rio de Janeiro and the Cape of Good Hope and covered more than 15,000 miles (24,000 km). It was quickly decided that Botany Bay was unsuitable for a penal settlement and an alternative location was sought. While waiting to move, a large gale arose preventing any sailing; during this period the French expeditionary fleet of Jean-François de Galaup, comte de Lapérousearrived in Botany Bay. The colony was established at Sydney Cove in Port Jackson when Governor Phillip arrived on 26 January aboard Supply.  Sirius arrived the following day.[13]

The British cordially received the French. Sirius's captains, through their officers, offered assistance and asked if Lapérouse needed supplies. However the French leader and the British commanders never met personally.

Lapérouse also took the opportunity to send his journals, some charts and some letters back to Europe with Sirius. After obtaining wood and fresh water, the French left on 10 March for New Caledonia, Santa Cruz, the Solomons, the Louisiades, and the western and southern coasts of Australia. The French fleet and all on board were never seen again. The documents carried by Sirius would be its only testament. Decades later it was discovered that Lapérouse's expedition had been shipwrecked on the island of Vanikoro.

Sirius left Port Jackson under the command of Hunter on 2 October 1788,[8] when she was sent back to the Cape of Good Hope to get flour and other supplies. The complete voyage, which took more than seven months to complete, returned just in time to save the near-starving colony.

In 1789, she was refitted in Mosman Bay, which was originally named Great Sirius Cove after the vessel. The name lives on in the adjacent Sirius Cove (formerly "Little Sirius Cove").[14]

On 19 March 1790, Sirius was wrecked on a reef at Norfolk Island while landing stores. Among those who witnessed the ship's demise from shore was Thomas Jamison, the surgeon for the penal settlement. Jamison would eventually become Surgeon-General of New South Wales. Sirius's crew was stranded on Norfolk Island until they were rescued on 21 February 1791. Hunter returned to England aboard Waaksamheid where he faced court martial and was honourably acquitted. He was appointed as Phillip's successor as Governor of New South Wales in February 1795, though he did not return to the colony until September.[8] One of the sailors on Sirius, Jacob Nagle, wrote a first-hand account of the ship's last voyage, wreck, and the crew's stranding.[15] With the settlement in New South Wales still on the brink of starvation, the loss of Sirius left the colonists with only one supply ship.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frolick you are right, of course Sirius ex Berwick, my mistake. That naturally explains the early carronades.

I would have found it almost more exciting if it had been the Mauritius Sirius.:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chapman,

There is a build thread of the Sirius from 1810 here on MSW.  The builder “Paul” has connections or was part of the excavation and he has pictures of some of the artifacts of the ship in his build.

 

Heres the link HMS SIRIUS - 1810

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Chapman said:

I would have found it almost more exciting if it had been the Mauritius Sirius.:D

Hi Chapman, if you are interested in the Mauritius sirius please visit my log in my signature below, where I have pictures of archaeology from Mauritius and my build of the 1796 Syrius

Regards

Paul

 

Thanks Dowmer, beat me by one minute😁

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Jim Lad said:

Chapman, this is the only other photo of the carronade I have.

 

Alan, Air New Zealand have regular flights to Norfolk Island from Sydney, Brisbane and Auckland.

 

John

 

580156129_125548-SiriusCarronadeNorfolkIsland.JPG.dc57bead994765e2db059b82d53259f9.JPG

Thank you for the photo, the gun looks as dangerous as it was.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Dowmer said:

Chapman,

There is a build thread of the Sirius from 1810 here on MSW.  The builder “Paul” has connections or was part of the excavation and he has pictures of some of the artifacts of the ship in his build.

 

Heres the link HMS SIRIUS - 1810

 

14 hours ago, paulsutcliffe said:

Hi Chapman, if you are interested in the Mauritius sirius please visit my log in my signature below, where I have pictures of archaeology from Mauritius and my build of the 1796 Syrius

Regards

Paul

 

Thanks Dowmer, beat me by one minute😁

Thank you guys, I didn't have the building report on the radar. I'll take a look over there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, uss frolick said:

Paul Sutcliffe, what, if anything, remains of the wreck of HBM Frigate Magicienne, 32, blown up in the same battle?

Hi Frolick

Im not sure anything has been found of the HMS magicienne, the team over there are currently working on the East Indiaman St Geran (1744) and the pirate ship Speaker (1702) I believe, but they are near to producing a shipwreck database which may give some more information, I will let you know when/if I hear anything.

Regards

Paul 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to “Advance Ship Modeling Through Research”. We provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model ships.

The Nautical Research Guild has published our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, since 1955. The pages of the Journal are full of articles by accomplished ship modelers who show you how they create those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you the correct details to build. The Journal is available in both print and digital editions. Go to the NRG web site (www.thenrg.org) to download a complimentary digital copy of the Journal. The NRG also publishes plan sets, books and compilations of back issues of the Journal and the former Ships in Scale and Model Ship Builder magazines.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×
×
  • Create New...