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My instructions for the deck planking recommend using a sharp #4 pencil to "simulate the nailing."  I don't know why this seems kindof mickey mouse to me, but it does.  Is there any other way?  Only other way I can think of is to poke tiny holes and then fill and sand, using a darker wood filler than the light Ramin wood of the planks.  More work but not that much more.  Any comments/suggestions/experiences?

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I drill holes and then stick round toothpicks which points I have previously dipped in wood glue, so I get 2 treenails per toothpick. A big waste but since they are so cheap, doesn't really matter. I have used the filling with filler and sanding method in my hull's nailing with fair success. (See my Vasa log, if you like).

What's good in both methods, is that the size of the "nail" (which isn't actually a nail in the real ship, but a plug) is determined by the size of the drill you use.

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Edited by Ulises Victoria
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Ulises has detailed the toothpick method quite nicely.  If you'd like to see the 'drill and fill' method with a brief description, see my Confederacy log (just click the link in my signature). It's on page 50, right near the last entries.  Both methods give you more flexibility then the 'pencil point' method you describe.

Edited by Augie
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Depending on how subtle you want to be, you can also take a hypodermic needle of appropriate gauge, grind the angle off it, and "stamp" a circle on the end of the planks.  The indent on the wood will be visible, but the effect is a lot more subtle than the drill and fill method.

 

Colin

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Depending on how subtle you want to be, you can also take a hypodermic needle of appropriate gauge, grind the angle off it, and "stamp" a circle on the end of the planks.  The indent on the wood will be visible, but the effect is a lot more subtle than the drill and fill method.

 

Colin

Aaaahhh! How nice tip!!! It sounds like better and quicker!!!! Thank you Colin.

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Don't know where to get a hypo needle so I think I will go with the drill and fill method. My question now though is what diameter bit/hole to put in. I'm calculating that with a 1:48 scale model and 5 mm planking, the actual Bounty must have had planks of around 240mm or 9.5 inches. They would probably have used two pegs in parallel per each plank along the length of the plank. Here's where I'm guessing -- I would figure the pegs would need to be around 1 inch or 25mm in diameter. If all the scaling were done for all the parts of the ship model, this would mean a diameter of .5 mm or .02 inches (or 1.3/64ths). Is this reasoning close to correct? How are these mini bits sized? In mm or fractions of an inch? Or, I've seen them numbered like a 60 or 80 bit. What do those numbers mean?

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If you want to see the effect look at the wales of my pandora (link in sig)

The photo's don't quite catch the effect.  Trial on scrap first to see if you like it.

I tried this out as I knew that in a properly sanded hull, real trenails (like dannys') aren't visible under paint.  My hull is pretty much going to be mostly painted.

 

Colin

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Captain Al,

Not sure where you are, but in the States you can get them over the counter at a pharmacy.  Over the years, I've bought the insulin syringes (and needles) for such things as fishing (putting air in worms... long story), dispensing glue, and other such sundry tasks.   They come in various sizes so do some research (Google is your friend) first.

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Captain Al,,

 

Size chart here... http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/chemistry/stockroom-reagents/learning-center/technical-library/needle-gauge-chart.html

 

a #21 needle has in inner diameter of 0.5.  Outer diam is about .8

 

Further points from experience.  Do it before your final sanding.  If you have a wood that is at all soft then go gently, as it is possible to take plugs out.  They don't look too different so it wasn't an issue for me.  Definitely trial first on scrap. Make sure you like the effect.

 

I'm a bit lucky that I work closely with a couple of GPs, and am allowed to just wander into the storage area and source materials.  :)

 

Colin

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